Conference Paper

Participatory design of sensing networks: strengths and challenges.

DOI: 10.1145/1795234.1795301 Conference: Proceedings of the Tenth Conference on Participatory Design, PDC 2008, Bloomington, Indiana, USA, October 1-4, 2008
Source: DBLP

ABSTRACT

Participatory design (PD) involves users in all phases of design to build systems that fit user needs while simultaneously helping users understand complex systems. We argue that traditional PD techniques can benefit participatory sensing: community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects in which complex technologies, such as sensing networks using mobile phones, are the research instruments. Based on our pilot work on CycleSense, a community-based data gathering system for bicycle commuters, we discuss the benefits and challenges of PD in participatory sensing settings, and outline a method to integrate PD into the research process.

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Available from: Deborah Estrin
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    • "Participatory sensing provides an opportunity to track and act on information while enabling the mapping and sharing of local knowledge at a personal scale (Shilton et al. 2008). Participants use ubiquitous computing devices and interact with their environments . "

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    • "The flourishing design community that has developed sits between both (Kensing & Blomberg 1998; Muller 2007). We need the same function for the development of knowledge infrastructures (Shilton et al. 2008). "

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    • "Participatory sensing provides an opportunity to track and act on information while enabling the mapping and sharing of local knowledge at a personal scale (Shilton et al. 2008). Participants use ubiquitous computing devices and interact with their environments . "
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