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Design of Haptic Interfaces for Therapy

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ABSTRACT Touch is fundamental to our emotional well-being. Medical science is starting to understand and develop touch-based therapies for autism spectrum, mood, anxiety and borderline disorders. Based on the most promising,touch therapy protocols, we are presenting the first devices that simulate touch through haptic devices to bring relief and assist clinical therapy for mental health. We present several haptic,systems,that enable,medical,professionals,to facilitate the collaboration between patients and doctors and potentially pave the way,for a new,form of non-invasive treatment that could be adapted from,use in care-giving facilities to public use. We developed,these prototypes working closely with a team of mental health professionals. Author Keywords Health Care, Tangible User Interfaces, Haptics, Wearable Computing, Touch Therapy, Psychotherapy. ACM Classification Keywords
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