HOMIE: An artificial companion for elderly people

Conference Paper · January 2005with 50 Reads
DOI: 10.1145/1056808.1057106 · Source: DBLP
Conference: Extended Abstracts Proceedings of the 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2005, Portland, Oregon, USA, April 2-7, 2005
Abstract
In this paper we present "Homie" an artificial companion for elderly people. Our approach emphasizes amusement and benefit - amusement in form of entertainment and benefit in terms of medical care. The key to awake elderly people's emotional engagement in an artificial companion is its emotional behavior. Therefore, we propose a companion that does not look technical, which is mostly associated with the words cold and impersonal. Furthermore it features facial expression and gesture. An important design aspect was that it is no additional burden for elderly people. Engaging with it is free and fun.

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