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Information Foraging in Information Access Environments.

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Abstract

lnfonnation foraging theory is an approach to the analysis of buman activities involving information access technologies. The theory derives from optimal foraging theory in biology and anthropology, which analyzes the adaptive value of food-foraging strategies. Information foraging theory analyzes trade-offs in the value of information gained against tbe costs of performing activity in human-computer interaction tasks. The theory is illustrated by application to information-seeking tasks involving a Scatter/Gather interface, which presents users with a navigable, automatically computed, overview of the contents of a document collection arranged as a cluster hierarchy.
... Prior work has focused on designing tools help with quickly moving information from the information foraging loop to the sensemaking loop (refer to Figure 2) [81,82,89,90]. For example, there are several research and industry tools to support active reading while searching using highlighting and note-taking [30,87,88], collecting information by bookmarking and clipping web content [12,49]), curating and organizing collected web content in a way that helps make sense of information [27,32,66,105], re-fnding information or resuming search sessions [39,75,104]. ...
... This might be afected by the availability heuristic, which is a mental shortcut where people often form connections, here of usefulness, between things that co-occur or seen in the same place together [28,69,99]. Previous work has explored the role of query suggestions in creating information scent (i.e. the proximal cues from which searchers perceive the value of distal information sources) [53,58,59,81]. As InterWeave suggestions present the user with gaps in their knowledge directly next to the parts of what they already know, it is creating a more contextualized trail of information which in turn helps with assessing usefulness and relevance of suggestions and information found on SERPs and websites. ...
... It consists of two interlinked interfaces: a powerful text-based search and a visual analytics exploration tool ( Figure 1). In the spirit of Pirolli and Card's (Pirolli and Card, 2005) sensemaking process, we aim to enable an improved information foraging (Pirolli and Card, 1995) process by enriching search with attribute-based exploration that visualizes the context of data sets and provides a means of semantic top-down exploration, which is a common approach for exploring unknown data or for analyzing collections (Patterson et al., 2001). ...
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The ever-increasing number of biomedical data sets provides tremendous opportunities for re-use but current data repositories provide limited means of exploration apart from text-based search. Ontological metadata annotations provide context by semantically relating data sets. Visualizing this rich network of relationships can improve the explorability of large data repositories and help researchers find data sets of interest. We developed SATORI—an integrative search and visual exploration interface for the exploration of biomedical data repositories. The design is informed by a requirements analysis through a series of semi-structured interviews. We evaluated the implementation of SATORI in a field study on a real-world data collection.SATORI enables researchers to seamlessly search, browse, and semantically query data repositories via two visualizations that are highly interconnected with a powerful search interface. SATORI is an open-source web application,which is freely available at http://satori.refinery-platform.org and integrated into the Refinery Platform.
... Information foraging theory (IFT) is a theory that seeks to explain how people seek information (Pirolli and Card 1995). In IFT, developers forage for information in patches which, in this study, correspond to the resources displayed in application windows. ...
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