Conference Paper

Dynamically Self-Organized Service Composition in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Service composition is a powerful tool to create new services rapidly by reusing existing ones. Previous research mainly focuses on the wired infrastructure-based environment. With the developments in mobile devices and wireless communication technology in recent years, mobile ad hoc network has received an increasing attention as a new communication paradigm. However, the existing service composition techniques do not work any longer in an ad hoc environment. In this paper, we present the service composition problem in wireless ad hoc network with full consideration of the characteristics of an ad hoc environment. To solve this problem, we develop two service composition routing algorithms, Simple Broadcasting Service Composition and Behavior Evolution Service Composition. The main contribution of our algorithms is that the whole process of service composition is done by the cooperation of nodes on-the-fly instead of a centralized broker to meet the peculiarity of ad hoc networks. Finally, we describe an initial implementation architecture for service composition in wireless ad hoc networks.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Service oriented methodology retains the benefits of component-based development. A lot of service oriented research is presented in [2], [4], [3]. It has an interface portrayed in a machine-process able format (especially Web Service Description Language-WSDL). ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In recent year's computational capability of the mobile nodes have been greatly improved. The mobile nodes have the capability of running different applications. Implementation of services in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs) increases the flexibility of using mobile devices for running a wide variety of applications. Single service cannot satisfy the user needs. The complex needs of the users can be satisfied by the service composition. Service composition means, combining the atomic services into a complex service. In this paper we propose QoS constraint service composition in MANETs. We considered both service QoS parameters as well node parameters. Response time and throughput as parameters for services and energy and hop count as node parameters. These four QoS parameters are optimized using a mathematical model Hammerstein model to generate a single output. Based on generated output, max valued (optimal) services are considered in service composition path. The simulation results shown that, our proposed method outperforms than the traditional AODV method of service composition.
Article
Full-text available
The Jack-in-the-Net Architecture (Ja-Net) that we present in this paper provides a unique and promising approach to design ubiquitous computing applications that can scale, self-organize, and adapt to short- and long-term changes in network conditions and user preferences. In Ja-Net, network applications are implemented by a group of distributed, autonomous entities called the cyber-entities. Each cyber-entity implements a function component related to its service and follows simple behavior rules (such as migration, replication, energy exchange, death, and relationship establishment with other cyber-entities). They form organizations or communities by establishing and learning useful relationships with a number of other cyber-entities and collectively provide higher level services through interactions among them. Consequently, desirable services and characteristics emerge in network applications through autonomous and self-organizing interactions among cyber-entities (service emergence). In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation of Ja-Net platform software that achieves dynamic and adaptive provision of network applications through service emergence. We also built an application for Ja-Net that features service emergence and we empirically verified that the application can adapt itself to user preferences.
Article
Full-text available
An ad hoc network is a collection of wireless mobile hosts forming a temporary network without the aid of any established infrastructure or centralized administration. In such an environment, it may be necessary for one mobile host to enlist the aid of other hosts in forwarding a packet to its destination, due to the limited range of each mobile host's wireless transmissions. This paper presents a protocol for routing in ad hoc networks that uses dynamic source routing. The protocol adapts quickly to routing changes when host movement is frequent, yet requires little or no overhead during periods in which hosts move less frequently. Based on results from a packet-level simulation of mobile hosts operating in an ad hoc network, the protocol performs well over a variety of environmental conditions such as host density and movement rates. For all but the highest rates of host movement simulated, the overhead of the protocol is quite low, falling to just 1% of total data packets t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Jack-in-the-Net Architecture (Ja-Net) is a biologically- inspired approach to design adaptive network applications in large-scale networks. In Ja-Net, a network application is dynamically created from a collection of autonomous components called cyber-entities. Cyberentities first establish relationships with other cyber-entities and collectively provide an application through interacting or collaborating with relationship partners. Strength of a relationship is the measure for the usefulness of the partner and adjusted based on the level of satisfaction indicated by a user who received an application. As time progresses, cyber-entities self-organize based on strong relationships and useful applications that users prefer emerge. We implemented Ja-Net platform software and cyber-entities to verify how popular applications (i.e., applications that users prefer) are created in Ja-Net.
Book
Full-text available
Technological advances in semiconductor processing and design as well as wireless networking are leading us towards the vision of Pervasive Computing. We envision that in the (near) future, devices all around a person, either embedded as a part of smart spaces, or being carried by other people in the vicinity, will provide an array of services that she might want to use. Development of customized services by integrating and executing existing ones has received a lot of attention in the last few years with respect to wired, infrastrutcure based web-services. However, service discovery and composition in web-based environments is performed in a centralized manner with the help of a fixed entity. Moreover, wired infrastructure-based service discovery and composition architectures do not take into consideration factors arising from the possible mobility of the service providers. In this paper, we present a distributed, de-centralized and fault-tolerant design architecture for reactive service composition in pervasive environments. The design of the architecture is based on a peer-to-peer model. We introduce two reactive techniques for service composition in our design. We also present the Anamika system, an initial implementation of our design architecture. We present experiments to show the functioning of our design and implementation.
Article
We describe some novel methods to compute the index of any integer relative to a given primitive root of a prime $p$. Our first method avoids the use of stored tables and apparently requires $O(p^{1/2})$ operations. Our second algorithm, which may be regarded as a method of catching kangaroos, is applicable when the index is known to lie in a certain interval; it requires $O(w^{1/2})$ operations for an interval of width $w$, but does not have complete certainty of success. It has several possible areas of application, including the factorization of integers.
Chapter
An ad hoc network is a collection of wireless mobile hosts forming a temporary network without the aid of any established infrastructure or centralized administration. In such an environment, it may be necessary for one mobile host to enlist the aid of other hosts in forwarding a packet to its destination, due to the limited range of each mobile host’s wireless transmissions. This paper presents a protocol for routing in ad hoc networks that uses dynamic source routing. The protocol adapts quickly to routing changes when host movement is frequent, yet requires little or no overhead during periods in which hosts move less frequently. Based on results from a packet-level simulation of mobile hosts operating in an ad hoc network, the protocol performs well over a variety of environmental conditions such as host density and movement rates. For all but the highest rates of host movement simulated, the overhead of the protocol is quite low, falling to just 1% of total data packets transmitted for moderate movement rates in a network of 24 mobile hosts. In all cases, the difference in length between the routes used and the optimal route lengths is negligible, and in most cases, route lengths are on average within a factor of 1.01 of optimal.
Conference Paper
E-Services are typically delivered point-to-point. However, the e-service environment creates the opportunity for providing value-added, integrated services, which are delivered by composing existing e-services. In order to enable organizations to pursue this business opportunity we have developed eFlow, a system that supports the specification, enactment, and management of composite e-services, modeled as processes that are enacted by a service process engine. Composite e-services have to cope with a highly dynamic business environment in terms of services and service providers. In addition, the increased competition forces companies to provide customized services to better satisfy the needs of every individual customer. Ideally, service processes should be able to transparently adapt to changes in the environment and to the needs of different customers with minimal or no user intervention. In addition, it should be possible to dynamically modify service process definitions in a simple and effective way to manage cases where user intervention is indeed required. In this paper we show how eFlow achieves these goals.
Conference Paper
Multi-enterprise processes (MEPs) are workflows consisting of a set of activities that are implemented by different enterprises. Tightly coupled Virtual Enterprises (VEs) typically agree on abstract MEPs (reference MEPs), to which each enterprise contributes single-enterprise processes (SEPs) that implement and refine the activities in the reference MEP. On the other end of the spectrum, loosely coupled VEs use service-based MEPs that fuse together heterogeneous services implemented and provided by different enterprises. Existing process models usually couple activities with their implementation. Therefore, they cannot effectively support such MEPs. In this paper, we introduce a Polymorphic Process Model (PPM) that supports both reference process- and service-based MEPs. To accomplish this, PPM decouples activity interface from activity implementation, and provides process polymorphism to support their mapping. In particular, PPM determines activity types from the activity interfaces, permits activity interface subtyping, and provides for the mapping of MEP activity types to concrete implementations via interface matching. We illustrate that these key PPM capabilities permit the late binding and use of multiple activity implementations within a MEP without modifying the MEP at run time or enumerating the alternative implementation at specification time.
Article
The Ninja project seeks to enable the broad innovation of robust, scalable, distributed Internet services, and to permit the emerging class of extremely heterogeneous devices to seamlessly access these services. Our architecture consists of four basic elements: bases, which are powerful workstation cluster environments with a software platform that simplifies scalable service construction; units, which are the devices by which users access the services; active proxies, which are transformational elements that are used for unit- or service-specific adaptation; and paths, which are an abstraction through which units, services, and active proxies are composed.
The ns Manual. The VINT Project
  • K Fall
  • K Varadhan
Adaptive Creation of Mobile Network Applications in the Jack-in-the-Net Architecture
  • T Itao
  • S Tanaka
  • T Suda
  • T Aoyama
Adaptive Creation of Mobile Network Applications in the Jack-in-the-Net Architecture. Wireless Networks
  • T Itao
  • S Tanaka
  • T Suda
  • T Aoyama
  • T. Itao