Conference Paper

Market-Based Cooperative Resource Allocation for Overlay Networks

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Abstract

In recent years, the notion of service overlay networks has been proposed as a promising solution for providing end-to-end QoS without changing the current Internet architecture. A major issue in deploying service overlay networks is determining how to allocate resources (such as link bandwidth) on a substrate network to overlay networks, while satisfying the end-to-end QoS requirements of applications running on each overlay network. This paper introduces the Market-based Cooperative Resource Allocation (MaCRA) architecture that achieves fair and efficient resource allocation in a decentralized manner. In MaCRA, resources on a substrate network are priced, and each overlay network provider creates an overlay network on a minimum cost basis to meet its application QoS requirements. MaCRA also allows each overlay network provider to trade their current resources with other overlay network providers when resources on a substrate network are not available or expensive. Simulation results demonstrate that MaCRA achieves fairness and efficiency in allocating resources for overlay networks when compared to existing mechanisms.

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... Network device resources such as computation power, memory access time, storage size, and bandwidth are limited and expensive. Thus, resources must be efficiently managed to extract maximal benefit in various application scenarios [3], [2], [1], [4]. ...
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