Conference PaperPDF Available

Competence Assessment for Spinal Anaesthesia

Authors:

Abstract and Figures

The authors describe a new approach towards assessing skills of medical trainees. Based on experiences from previous projects with (i) applying virtual environments for medical training and (ii) competence assessment and personalisation in technology enhanced learning environments, a system for personalised medical training with virtual environments is built. Thus, the prac- tical training of motor skills is connected with the user-oriented view of person- alised computer-based testing and training. The results of this integration will be tested using a haptic device for training spinal anaesthesia.
Content may be subject to copyright.
A preview of the PDF is not available
... Recognizing the success of the CbKST approach as well as the urgent and great need in the medical domain, a new project MedCAP ( " Competence Assessment for Spinal Anaesthesia " , homepage: http://www.medcap.eu) commenced in 2007 [10]. It aims to transfer the innovative CbKST approach to the medical domain in order to develop a valid, reliable and practical CAP for one medical procedural skill, spinal anaesthesia. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Traditional approaches of assessment in the medical domain are insufficient for evaluating trainees' technical skills. Currently, many European medical training bodies are attempting to introduce competence-based training programmes for technical skills as well as other domains (e.g., communication, professional behaviour, clinical cognition). These efforts are limited due to the absence of appropriate assessment tools. Based on Competence-based Knowledge Space Theory (CbKST), a collaborative project MedCAP intends to develop a valid and reliable competence assessment procedure for one important medical skill, spinal anaesthesia. The paper briefly overviews the current states of training and assessment for medical procedural skills, describes the core ideas of CbKST, and introduces the ongoing project that will transfer the innovative approach of CbKST in personalized learning and competence assessment to the medical domain.
... Berlin: Springer. of the art learning management system. Within this aim, we focus on the technical realisation of previously published conceptual ideas [1, 2]. After briefly introducing spinal anaesthesia and the Competence-based Knowledge Space Theory (CbKST) in the remainder of this introduction, we will give some general information on the web and simulation based system for spinal anaesthesia. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The authors present an approach for implementing a system for the assessment of medical competences using a haptic simulation device. Based on Competence based Knowledge Space Theory (CbKST), information on the learners’ competences is gathered from different sources (test questions, data from the simulator, and supervising experts’ assessments). The envisaged architecture consists of three core modules, an LMS (Moodle) containing user model and content objects and realising the interface between system and user, a simulator interface as an own service connecting the LMS to the (external) simulator system, and a CbKST service offering the assessment logic and visualisations of the assessment result for learner and teacher.
Conference Paper
This paper presents the development and preliminary evaluation of a Virtual Reality-based system for training in dental anesthesia. The development focused the simulation of an anesthesia procedure task. The evaluation involved graphic and haptic issues and had the presence of experts in the dentistry area. The assessment aimed at attributes that may influence the human-computer interaction, hindering realism, an important challenge in systems of this type. The attributes selected were: the update rate, the appearance of the virtual models and the number of viewpoints of the virtual environment, as well as the characteristics of the haptic device. Despite constraints were found, in the perception of the experts, the system may provide realism and help with the training of certain tasks.
Article
In computerized assessment of knowledge it is important to quickly estimate the competence state of a testee. This is particularly true for digital educational games where this kind of assessment has to be done in a non-invasive way, i.e., by avoiding any queries or interruptions. This paper presents the mathematical foundation of a model by which a large set of competence states is partitioned in disjoint subsets and the probability of a subject being in a particular state is calculated for the subsets of states and updated according to the monitored performance. Based on this calculation adaptive interventions can be automatically chosen by tailoring the upcoming problem to the competence state of the user.
Conference Paper
Several fields of the knowledge have been benefited by technologies from Virtual Reality (VR) area. This paper presents an analysis of problems related to the domain of dentistry, specifically for training in anesthesia, and the possibility of resolution using VR. The analysis assumes that the haptic interaction in virtual environments is relevant in the area of training in health and may contribute in the skills acquisition, providing realistic experiences to the trainess. Initially, a detailed requirements survey with the participation of experts was conducted, as well as the development of a prototype for preliminary testing.
Article
Thirty-one central neural blockade simulators have been implemented into clinical practice over the last thirty years either commercially or for research. This review aims to provide a detailed evaluation of why we need epidural and spinal simulators in the first instance and then draws comparisons between computer-based and manikin-based simulators. This review covers thirty-one simulators in total; sixteen of which are solely epidural simulators, nine are for epidural plus spinal or lumbar puncture simulation, and six, which are solely lumbar puncture simulators. All hardware and software components of simulators are discussed, including actuators, sensors, graphics, haptics, and virtual reality based simulators. The purpose of this comparative review is to identify the direction for future epidural simulation by outlining necessary improvements to create the ideal epidural simulator. The weaknesses of existing simulators are discussed and their strengths identified so that these can be carried forward. This review aims to provide a foundation for the future creation of advanced simulators to enhance the training of epiduralists, enabling them to comprehensively practice epidural insertion in vitro before training on patients and ultimately reducing the potential risk of harm.
Article
Full-text available
Personalized eLearning Systems tailor the learning experience to characteristics of individual learners. These tailored course offerings are often comprised of discrete electronic learning resources, such as text snippets, interactive animations, diagrams, and videos. An extension of standard metadata schemas developed for facilitating the discovery and reuse of such adaptive learning resources can also be utilized by the eLearning systems for realizing the adaptivity. An important feature of such reuse supporting adaptive systems is the clear distinction of separate models and components within the teaching process.
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we present an approach to microadaptivity, i.e. to adaptivity within complex learning situations as they occur, e.g., in game-based learning. Integrating the competence-based knowledge space theory and the information-processing theory of human problem solving we developed a sound model as a basis for microadaptivity and continuous competence state monitoring. The architectural design of a first demonstrator is presented.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Abstract Digital game-based ,learning is a ,hot topic of research and development. Since the advent of computer and video games, educators were inherently interested in utilizing the beneficial aspects of computer games for educational purposes. These factors are primarily the intrinsic motivation of games, immersive environments, engaging stories, and an artful balance between challenges and continuously,growing ,abilities. Proponents of computer ,games ,delivered a large ,number ,of empirical investigations revealing that games may ,foster the development ,of abilities ,and competencies. Besides the advantageous aspects of computer games, a variety of problems were reported by researchers. Due to the high costs of professional game development, many educational games ,are technologically poor and cannot compete ,with entertainment ,games ,in terms of visual design, possibilities for interactions, or storytelling. Moreover, many current educational games do not incorporate a sound psychological, pedagogical, or didactic background; instead they are focusing on transmission ,or rehearsal ,of isolated ,facts or skills. Finally, such games lack the ability to adapt to individual competencies failing to balance challenge and abilities regarding knowledge or skills. The ELEKTRA project, introduced in this article, aims for addressing these problems relying on an interdisciplinary approach of cognitive science, neuroscience, pedagogy, game design, and game development. The project will develop an adventure,game ,that can ,keep ,up with ,commercial games ,and ,that focuses on primarily curriculum-related educational,purposes by incorporating a sound,psychological and pedagogical framework. Moreover, the project will prove the outcomes of research and development by a comprehensive,game demonstrator.
Article
Full-text available
Usability is most often defined as the acceptability of a system for a particular class of users carrying out specific tasks in specific environment. Ease of use affects performance of the user and his satisfaction, which finally regulates the wish of the user to use the product or not. Thus, it is of great importance for every software practitioner that he should not only be aware of varius usability methods, but also be able to determine the best method suited to a software project. In case of human-computer interaction (HCI), it is a must to determine the usability of the product before prototyping it.
Article
Full-text available
RATH is an adaptive tutoring WWW software prototype combining a mathematical model for the structure of hypertext with the theory of knowledge spaces from mathematical psychology. Using prerequisite relationships between different items in a domain of knowledge and using the knowledge about the pupil's current knowledge state RATH presents only those links in a hypertext document to the pupil which point to a document for which he/she fulfils all prerequisites and which he/she therefore should be able to understand. In a first prototype course, this idea is applied to the field of elementary probability theory. This tiny course is based on prior research of the second author. Thus, RATH is an important step in bringing psychological theories into a working tutorial system.
Article
The information regarding a particular field of knowledge is conceptualized as a large, specified set of questions (or problems). The knowledge state of an individual with respect to that domain is formalized as the subset of all the questions that this individual is capable of solving. A particularly appealing postulate on the family of all possible knowledge states is that it is closed under arbitrary unions. A family of sets satisfying this condition is called a knowledge space. Generalizing a theorem of Birkhoff on partial orders, we show that knowledge spaces are in a one-to-one correspondence with AND/OR graphs of a particular kind. Two types of economical representations of knowledge spaces are analysed: bases, and Hasse systems, a concept generalizing that of a Hasse diagram of a partial order. The structures analysed here provide the foundation for later work on algorithmic procedures for the assessment of knowledge.
Book
We have learned from Theorem 2.2.4 that any learning space is a knowledge space, that is, a knowledge structure closed under union. The ∪-closure property is critical for the following reason. Certain knowledge spaces, and in particular the finite ones, can be faithfully summarized by a subfamily of their states. To wit, any state of the knowledge space can be generated by forming the union of some states in the subfamily. When such a subfamily exists and is minimal for inclusion, it is unique and is called the ‘base’ of the knowledge space. In some cases, the base can be considerably smaller than the knowledge space, which results in a substantial economy of storage in a computer memory. The extreme case is the power set of a set of n elements, where the 2n knowledge states can be subsumed by the family of the n singleton sets. This property inspires most of this chapter, beginning with the basic concepts of ‘base’ and ‘atoms’ in Sections 3.4 to 3.6. Other features of knowledge spaces are also important, however, and are dealt with in this chapter.