Conference Paper

IREX MPO: A multi-path option for the iREX inter-domain QoS policy architecture

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Abstract

The inter-domain Resource Exchange (iREX) architecture uses economic market mechanisms to automate the deployment of end-to-end (E2E) inter-domain (ID) quality of service (QoS) policy among resource consumer and resource provider Internet Service Providers (ISPs). In iREX, each policy reservation is deployed on a single E2E ID path made up of the most "desirable" (i.e. cheapest and least congested) ISP resources. To accommodate ISPs that prefer redundancy when deploying ID QoS policy, in this paper we introduce an extension to the iREX architecture that gives an originating ISP a multi- path option (MPO) when deploying a reservation. MPO takes an initiating ISP's preference for redundancy and provides information about the available path options to achieve this preference in a distributed manner. Our simulation results show that while providing redundancy to the originating ISP using MPO does increase its resource costs in accordance to an ISP's preference, it only marginally increases overhead, and does not affect overall network performance - in fact the use of MPO lowers congestion.

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... Also, there are several proposals which loose the strict requirements (e.g. convergence and accuracy of route conditions) on protocol performance while they still expect some level of global coordination or information such as iRex and NIRA [7], [10] to be able to offer flexible and demanding services (e.g., QoS, Economic-incentive aware routing). For preserving generality of the routing solution, we cannot take an approach that purely depends on tier-based routing. ...
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... Initial work on iREX was previously published by Yahaya and Suda in [10], work defining the iREX architecture was previously published by Yahaya and Suda in [11], preliminary work exploring iREX efficiency was previously published by Yahaya, Harks and Suda in [12], and work suggesting a multi-path extension to iREX was previously published by Yahaya and Suda in [48]. ...
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vii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Relation to Prior Work : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 2 1.2 Contribution and Organization of the Paper : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 2 Problem Formulation 4 3 Message Transmission Problem 5 3.1 Shortest-Widest Paths : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5 3.2 Properties of Multipaths : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 3.3 NP-Completeness of MTP : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 10 3.4 Approximate Routing Algorithm : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 14 3.5 Relation to Maximum Flow Algorithm : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 16 3.6 Simulation Results : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 18 3.7 Delay-Bandwidth Product : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 24 4 Sequence Transmission Problem 25 4.1 Intractability Results : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 25 4.2 Approximation Algorithm : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 28 5 Concl...
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This full text paper was peer reviewed at the direction of IEEE Communications Society subject matter experts for publication in the ICC
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