Conference Paper

Fine-Grained Adaptive User Interface for Personalization of a Word Processor: Principles and a Preliminary Study

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Abstract

We introduce novel fine-grained adaptive user interface for the OpenOffice.org Writer word processor. It provides a panel container with personalized user interface to an individual user. The personalization is provided on frequently or recently used user commands, user’s preferred interaction styles and frequently used parameters to user commands. The next part of the paper describes a proof-of-concept usability study. We measured task completion times and error rates on the proposed adaptive interface, menus and toolbars on a word processing task.

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