Conference Paper

Towards a Generic Cloud-Based Virtual Research Environment

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Conference Paper

Towards a Generic Cloud-Based Virtual Research Environment

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Abstract

Virtual collaboration is an important aspect for the success of scientific projects, especially if participating researchers are distributed over the whole globe. In the recent past some systems - so called virtual research environments - were presented to support collaborative work restricted to certain research domains. Within this article a concept of a generic framework for building personal, cloud-based virtual research environments easily is proposed. Such an environment could be defined by composing arbitrary services, appropriate to the requirements of a particular scientist. Due to low funds in some scientific areas, we also provide a flexible billing strategy using the cloud specific pay-per-use model. Thus, each service has just to be paid as long as it is utilized. Virtual Research Environment; Cloud Computing; Layered Architecture; Virtualization; Virtual Collaboration; Pay-per-use I. INTRODUCTION

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... Scientific workflow management systems are other examples of support systems; they aim to automate the execution of data pipelines or computing tasks across remotely distributed infrastructures. 15 VREs or Science Gateway, to a certain extent, can be seen as a new generation of those early systems with better support for data-intensive applications on remote infrastructures (e.g., cloud), 16 research activities across entire research lifecycles ‡ ‡ and collaboration and sharing within a community. 17 In many cases, the differences among those systems are not clearly cut. ...
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... Bastian Roth et al [10] have sort after the challenges in scientific collaboration and proposed an approach, which leverages on groupware tools and hypervisor-based virtualization techniques like KVM, VMware vSphere or Xen to run a generic collaboration platform. ...
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p class="Default">Cloud-based research collaboration platforms render scalable, secure and inventive environments that enabled academic and scientific researchers to share research data, applications and provide access to high- performance computing resources. Dynamic allocation of resources according to the unpredictable needs of applications used by researchers is a key challenge in collaborative research environments. We propose the design of Cloud Container based Collaborative Research (CCCORE) framework to address dynamic resource provisioning according to the variable workload of compute and data-intensive applications or analysis tools used by researchers. Our proposed approach relies on–demand, customized containerization and comprehensive assessment of resource requirements to achieve optimal resource allocation in a dynamic collaborative research environment. We propose algorithms for dynamic resource allocation problem in a collaborative research environment, which aim to minimize finish time, improve throughput and achieve optimal resource utilization by employing the underutilized residual resources. </p
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