Conference Paper

Minesweeper for Sensor Networks--Making Event Detection in Sensor Networks Dependable

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Abstract

Event detection using wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has become a new field of research in the past years, increasing the need for dependability and fault tolerance. Our work exploits the massive redundancy of large WSNs in combination with neighbours' relations to identify faulty nodes. We present a new approach to categorize nodes in being faulty or fault free based on the event detection results of the nodes' neighbours and the nodes adjacent to the neighbours. For error probabilities < 0.2 our algorithm performs closely to other work in the field, and performs considerably better for error probabilities up to 0.5.

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... Minesweeper game had been used for pedagogical reasons in learning programming language [10], mathematical concept [1], and quantum mechanics [11]. It also had been adopted as a model for real-world problems such as event sensor detection in networks [12], application to information security, such as prevention of cryptocurrency obfuscation [13] and developing steganography scheme [14]. ...
... The well known MineSweeper game is much more complex than expected at first sight [8,1,12], and a good tool for modeling in a clean way some real world problems [7]. The most classical approach for MineSweeper is based on Constraint Satisfaction Problems [14], as in Section 2.2: this provides a provably correct estimate of the belief state, and then classically after CSP one plays the covered location with least probability of being a mine. ...
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... All our experiments are performed on the MineSweeper game; the MineSweeper game is more complicated than expected at first view [12,4,17]. MineSweeper has motivated a lot of research, sometimes for pedagogical reasons [3] (including a nice version aimed at teaching quantum mechanics [10]), or because it is a widely spread game (anyone here who has never played a MineSweeper game ?), or as a model for real problems [11], and as a challenge for machine learning [6] or genetic programming [14]. ...
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