Conference Paper

VDE: Seamless Mobility on Desktop Environment

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Abstract

Virtual desktop environment (VDE) provides a real virtual working environment in which users could personally customize and update the application list from application template libraries. The heterogeneous applications actually running in the remote application servers could cooperatively communicate with each other. It is a thin client approach to mobility in which the perfect combination of VM technology and DFS technology are the keys to the rapid seamless resuming of the usage scenarios. Usage scenarios are incrementally suspended including the user's documents and the running applications. The usage data stored in data center provides a unified view for the users through historical scenario manager and ensures the data's security and reliability at the same time. This paper explores the building policy of a real virtual working environment and the suspending/resuming policy of usage scenarios. Experiments demonstrate and evaluate VDE's efficiency and effectiveness.

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