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RFID-Enabled Traceability in the Food Supply Chain

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Purpose – This paper aims to study the main requirements of traceability and examine how the technology of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can address these requirements. It further seeks to outline both an information data model and a system architecture that will make traceability feasible and easily deployable across a supply chain. Design/methodology/approach – The design research approach is followed, associating traceability requirements to a proposed system design. Findings – The technological approach used has great implications in relation to the cost associated with a traceability system and the ease of its deployment. Research limitations/implications – Validation of the proposed information data model and system architecture is required through practical deployment in different settings. Practical implications – The paper provides practitioners with insight on how RFID technology can meet traceability requirements and what technological approach is more appropriate. Originality/value – Food quality has become an important issue in the last decade. However, achieving end-to-end traceability across the supply chain is currently quite a challenge from a technical, a co-ordination and a cost perspective. The paper contributes by suggesting a specific technological approach, exploiting the new possibilities provided by RFID technology, to address these issues.
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... Studies reporting on traceability models or modeling traceability [36,38,45,48,51,52,55,[58][59][60][62][63][64][65]67,69,73,[75][76][77] Studies reporting on traceability systems or the components of traceability systems [33][34][35][37][38][39][40][41][42][43][44][46][47][48][49][50]53,54,56,57,61,66,68,[70][71][72]74,[78][79][80][81] Stages documented in the studies on traceability systems included conceptual work, design proposals, technology development, implementation and evaluation; in a number of cases, this is evaluated through simulation (Table 4). ...
... Dehumidifiers and associated critical parts [55] Meat products and packaged products [60] Generic terms used traceable items [69] traceable unit [58] product [73] traceable assets [77] Inconsistent use of terms [48] Clearly identified traceable artifacts (in SW product lines) [38] product knowledge during the design and manufacturing phases [75] Different granularity or different nature of the entity to be tracked/raced ...
... A framework for traceability implementation based on traceability requirements and utilizing IDEF-0 (integrated computer-aided manufacturing (ICAM) definition Part 0) model to show its implementation at an actor level, illustrating the integration of the different supply chain actors using a unified modeling language (UML) sequential diagram and the extensible markup language (XML) [45] A framework for traceability implementation in the bulk grain supply chain, based on the usage requirements of the traceability system from each actor involved, an IDEF-0 model for developing and implementing an internal traceability system at a grain elevator and electronic data interchange (EDI) and XML (extensible markup language) for information interchange [52] A unified modeling framework with a hierarchical-modeling approach (ontology-modeling layer, process-modeling layer and object-modeling layer) to support the modeling and design of IoT systems for product logistics supply chain systems (PLSCS), to reduce system modeling and design complexity while achieving high system reusability and maintainability and allowing to track both product and parts [55] Basic modeling of service-oriented architecture, including requirements analysis, for a wood supply chain [67] An information infrastructure for RFID-enabled traceability that would provide an interface based on web-services technology for integration with the global EPC network and that would be cost-effective for an SME supply chain [69] A "traceability framework that would support the tracing and sharing of product knowledge throughout the product development phase of its lifecycle, i.e. product design and product manufacturing", and that addresses the contextual, the conceptual, the logical, the physical, the out-of-context and the functioning system levels [75] (p. 547) ...
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Research and implementation efforts and investment in the circular economy are rising sharply. With the high stakes associated with achievements in the field, an increasing emphasis on evaluation, transparency and accountability are to be expected. All require high-quality data, methodologies and tools that are able to improve results and to assess and document the implementation processes and outcomes. A challenging key issue in the implementation of a circular economy is ensuring coordination, control and transparency within a network of parties. Traceability models and systems are vital pillars of such an endeavor, but a preliminary search of the available literature revealed a rather unstable and fragmented research field and practice. The objective of this systematic review was to examine those studies discussing traceability models and traceability systems while connecting traceability capacities and outputs to implement the principles of the circular economy. The literature databases were searched on 6 January 2020, with an update for the entire year of 2020. Overall, 49 studies were included. By addressing eight specific research questions, we found that a link between traceability and the circular economy is yet to be established. Sound research and practice documentation are required to establish evidence regarding this connection, including methodologies that are able to support the design and implementation of business- and lifecycle-oriented, value-based traceability models and traceability systems, along with thorough evaluation methods and tools incorporating economic, social and environmental perspectives.
... Ultimately, since a cold chain possesses many special features that distinguish it from other types of supply chain such as short shelf life, refrigerated transportation and storage requirements, traceability, product appearance, taste, colour and size, seasonality in production, etc., it is quite challenging to measure the performance of a cold chain [2]. Besides similar performance measures to a primary supply chain, some innovative performance factors are added to the performance system of cold chain such as the continuity of food supply [56], improvement in cost control and innovation [57], stability of perishable goods in logistics chains [58], and traceability [59][60][61]. Both prior and up-to-date performance measures of CSCs thus classified into three overarching performance dimensions: profitoriented, client-oriented and environment-oriented. Figure 2 provides an overview of classification scheme for supply chain collaboration and (cold) supply chain performance retrieved from the literature. ...
... Both prior and up-to-date performance measures of CSCs thus classified into three overarching performance dimensions: profitoriented, client-oriented and environment-oriented. Figure 2 provides an overview of classification scheme for supply chain collaboration and (cold) supply chain performance retrieved from the literature. performance factors are added to the performance system of cold chain such as the continuity of food supply [56], improvement in cost control and innovation [57], stability of perishable goods in logistics chains [58], and traceability [59][60][61]. Both prior and up-todate performance measures of CSCs thus classified into three overarching performance dimensions: profit-oriented, client-oriented and environment-oriented. Figure 2 provides an overview of classification scheme for supply chain collaboration and (cold) supply chain performance retrieved from the literature. ...
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Collaboration in a supply chain continuously proves its role in increasing the performance of supply chains, which attracts the attention of both academia and practitioners, specifically, how to generate higher impacts of collaborative partnership on the performance of supply chains and measure them. In cold supply chains of agriculture and foods, the vital need for collaboration becomes even more significant to improve the performance. Therefore, this paper reviews relevant articles derived from the Web of Science and Scopus databases. Via the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), the research team classifies the types of collaborative partnership in cold agriculture and food supply chains, issues of the literature when analyzing collaboration impacts on the performance of CSCs of agriculture and foods, and finally, the opportunities for the future research to boost the collaboration practices in these cold chains. Following this sequence, 102 articles were eventually extracted for the systematic review to identify themes for not only addressing the review questions but also highlighting future research opportunities for both development of partnership integration and performance of the cold chains of agriculture and foods.
... Daily scanning using RFID has exceeded over 5 billion products in 141 countries. RFID technology combined with appropriate information infrastructure enables traceability in the FSC (Kelepouris, 2014). ...
... IoT is widely used in the FSC by integrating sensors/actuators, RFID tags, and communication technologies (Zhang et al., 2017;Coronado Mondragon et al., 2020). These have proven the industry's reliance on IoT and RFID in the FSC production cycle (Kelepouris, 2014). ...
... A five-point Likert scale was used to generate the feedback of respondents. Items in the survey instrument were adapted from previous studies -Halal traceability technology system (Kelepouris et al., 2007); Halal traceability technology training (Poniman et al., 2015); Halal logistics brand (Aoun and Tournois, 2015) and (Jamal and Sharifuddin, 2015) Halal logistics performance (Ab . IBM SPSS version 24 was used to analyse the descriptive statistics, and partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) version 3.2.8 was used for data modelling. ...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of Halal traceability technology usage on Halal logistics performance with a Halal logistics brand as a mediator. Design/methodology/approach An online survey was conducted to gather responses from logistics service providers (LSPs), including strategic logistics units (manufacturing/brand owners) in Malaysia, which offer Halal logistics services. Findings Halal traceability technology system and Halal traceability training are two critical domains to strengthen market recognition of Halal logistics brand for LSPs. The study found that the Halal logistics brand played a mediating role in connecting the usage of Halal traceability technology and logistics performance. Practical implications The logistics industry needs to focus on Halal logistics services as a unique proposition. The ability of LSPs to build a Halal logistics brand thru traceability technology had created positive impressions for clients. LSPs must consistently engage in Halal training and remain technologically alert to build Halal brand value. Halal-based strategic branding will assist an LSP to stand out among its competitors. Originality/value Even though Halal branding has been studied widely, little attention has been given to how the usage of Halal traceability technology can improve Halal logistics branding and logistics operational performance. The result suggests that LSPs need to build a Halal logistics brand and design a proper logistics business strategy to target Sharia compliance-oriented consumers.
... La ISO 8402-1994 define la trazabilidad como: "La capacidad de rastrear el historial, la aplicación o la ubicación de una entidad mediante identificaciones registradas" [21], esta misma definición fue adoptada por [20], [22], [23] y [24], en esta se resalta la importancia de disponer de la información histórica del producto. En este mismo enfoque, Tamayo [25] define la trazabilidad como la capacidad para rastrear bienes a lo largo de la cadena de distribución con base en un número de lote o número de serie [25], adicionalmente Regattieri [26] afirma que la trazabilidad permite el rastreo de los productos, convirtiéndose en el registro de la historia de un producto. ...
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Contexto: Los intereses en los hábitos alimentarios de los consumidores han vuelto relevante el acceso a la información relacionada con un producto, donde toma relevancia la trazabilidad en la cadena de suministro de alimentos (TCSA). Método: Para identificar los principales focos problemáticos y los retos a enfrentar en los sistemas de trazabilidad y el modelado de la TCSA, se realizó una revisión sistemática de la literatura en la que se analizaron 84 artículos y se presentaron diferentes taxonomías sobre modelos de gestión, modelos de optimización y modelos de simulación, luego se realizó una discusión sobre retos y futuros focos en el modelado de trazabilidad en las cadenas de suministro de alimentos (CSA). Resultados: Se identificaron limitaciones en el tipo de decisiones analizadas (tácticas y operativas), asimetrías en el flujo de información entre eslabones, falta de modelos robustos, relevancia de la gestión de la información como instrumento de integración, vacíos en la medición de políticas de gestión tecnológica en la trazabilidad, necesidad de modelos holísticos y brechas en la relación entre trazabilidad y sostenibilidad. Conclusiones: Hace falta el desarrollo de modelos basados en la gestión de tecnologías, los sistemas de trazabilidad que faciliten las relaciones y los flujos entre los diferentes actores, el desarrollo de modelos de gestión logística sostenible que involucren la trazabilidad, la utilización de enfoques multicriterio relacionando múltiples eslabones y cuantificar diferentes medidas de desempeño de la CSA para maximizar los beneficios de la trazabilidad mediante modelos multiobjetivo.
... Authors also discussed the different technologies like radio frequency identification (RFID), bar codes, and alphanumerical codes. Kelepouris et al. (2007) discussed the practical circumstance on usage of RFID in the traceability of food products supply chain. ...
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The rapid growth of population in metropolitan areas has put incremental pressure on urban cities. The centric strategy towards smart cities are expected to cover solution for metropolitan life and ecological environment. One of the significant application areas of IoT in smart cities is the food industry. IoT systems help to monitor, analyze, and manage the real-time food industry in smart cities. In this research, we proposed an IoT based Dynamic Food Supply Chain for Smart Cities which not only ensures the food quality but also provides intelligent vehicle routing as well as tracing sources of contamination in FCM. Furthermore, a smart sensor data collection strategy based on IoT is utilized which would improve the efficiency and accuracy of the supply chain network with the minimized size of dataset and vehicle routing algorithm is introduced and tracing the contamination sources of infected food in the markets. Our proposed model is evaluated with the comprehensive evaluation and used various performance metrics such as tracing accuracy, delay, execution time, and traveling time. The results show that the proposed system outperforms when compared with existing approach.
Thesis
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