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Facilitating Online Learning: Effective Strategies for Moderators.

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Abstract

With the advent of the 21st century, educators are being thrust into a new teaching environment: the cyber-classroom. In an attempt to stay competitive, many courses are being offered through higher learning institutions such educational software platforms such as Blackboard (http://www. blackboard. com/) and WebCT (http://www. webct. com/). Often, in-house training seminars attempt to target the manner in which course content is delivered through these platforms, but fail to inform teachers of the importance and need for creating healthy communication between participants within the course. With this in mind, Facilitating Online Learning: Effective Strategies for Moderators uniquely focuses on the teacher/moderator as a communication agent within the online learning environment. In Facilitating Online Learning: Effective Strategies for Moderators, Collison, Elbaum, Haavind, and Tinker (2000) address this critical issue, noting that "course design and presentation mechanisms-together with excellence in online dialogue facilitation-separate the excellent online course from the mediocre or weak one" (p. xiv).

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... The low cognitive facilitation guide focused mainly on social and motivational presence, and instructed facilitators to avoid using any of the strategies used on the high cognitive facilitation. The strategies on the high cognitive facilitation guide (Table 1) were drawn from the model defined by Collison et al. (2000). ...
... Cognitive Facilitation Strategies* (adapted from Collison et al., 2000 ...
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