Article

High Performance Digital Media Network (HPDMnet): An advanced international research initiative and global experimental testbed

Authors:
  • Inocybe Technologies
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Abstract

Currently, support for digital media is one of the fastest growing requirements of the Internet as demand transitions from services designed to support primarily text and images to those intended also to support rich, high quality streaming multi-media. In response to the need to address this important 21st century communications challenge, an international consortium of network research organizations has established an initiative, the High Performance Digital Media Network (HPDMnet), to investigate key underlying problems, to design potential solutions, to prototype those solutions on a global experimental testbed, and to create an initial set of production services. The HPDMnet service is being designed not only to support general types of digital media but also those based on extremely high resolution, high capacity data streams. These HPDMnet services, which are based on a wide range of advanced architectural concepts at all layers, provide a framework for network middleware that allows non-traditional resources to enable new network services, including those based on dynamically provisioned international lightpaths supported by flexible optical-fiber and optical switching technology. These HPDMnet services have been showcased at major national and international forums, and they are being implemented within several next generation communications exchanges.

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... One of the first such large-scale, distributed environments based on dynamically provisioned lightpaths, which was designed for dataintensive science and visualization, was the OptIPuter, a national fabric with international extensions based on the international Global Lamda Integrated Facility (GLIF) [29], [57], [58] . A more recent example is the High- Performance Digital Media Network (HPDMnet), a global distributed experimental dynamically provisioned Layer1/ Layer2 (L1/L2) end-to-end network spanning four continents that can support extremely high-resolution scientific visualization, medical imaging, virtual spaces, stereo 3-D movies and 4 k and 8 k streams [59]. The HPDMnet initiative comprises three areas of activity, one related to content, one to services and intelligent middleware, and one to an underlying network research testbed. ...
... When the number of streams increases, so do the bandwidth and processing power, which raises the issue of network utilization and end-system scalability. To address the bandwidth-and end-system performance challenge, the potential to implement a media composing middleware was investigated, which, based on the receiver requirements , can compose multiple media streams into a single stream for visualization [59], [62]. For instance, assume that three streams are received, and the user would like to see two of them in the foreground in high resolution, and the third one in the background, in low resolution. ...
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Chapter
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this paper combines very good property for load balancing
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  • S Bradley
  • F Burstein
  • L Cottrell
  • B Gibbard
  • D Katramatos
  • Y Li
  • S Mckee
  • R Pope-Scu
  • D Stampf
  • D Yu
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  • J Mambretti
F. Travestino, J. Mambretti, G. Karmous-Edwards, GridNetworks: Enabling Grids with Advanced Communication Services, Wiley, Chichester, 2006.
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  • N Rao
  • D Yu
D. Petravick, N. Ghani, J. Mambretti, B. Wing, N. Rao, D. Yu, Workshop Report on Advanced Networking for Distributed Petascale Science: R & D Challenges and Opportunities, US Department of Energy Office of Science, April 8–9, 2008.
Extending the argia software with a dynamic optical multicast service to support high performance digital media, in: Optical Switching and Networking, in: Recent Trends on Optical Network Design and Modeling— Selected Topics from ONDM
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Eduard Grasa, Sergi Figuerola, Albert Forns, Gabriel Junyent, Joe Mambretti, Extending the argia software with a dynamic optical multicast service to support high performance digital media, in: Optical Switching and Networking, in: Recent Trends on Optical Network Design and Modeling— Selected Topics from ONDM 2008, vol. 6, 2009, pp. 120–128.
StarLight: next generation communication services, exchanges, and global facilities
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Globus: a metacomputing infrastructure toolkit. The International Journal of Supercomputer Applications
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