Conference Paper

Semantic Networks with Number Restricted Roles or Another Story about Clyde

Conference Paper

Semantic Networks with Number Restricted Roles or Another Story about Clyde

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Abstract

The Number Restriction of Roles, first proposed in KL-ONE, gives a Semantic Network formalism great expressive power. On the other hand, hybrid systems having such features as part of their terminological knowledge representation formalism have great difficulties in using these Number Restrictions for inferences and consistency checking in their assertional component. Some of these difficulties are discussed in this paper and a solution, worked out as part of the BACK system, is presented [1].

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... The result we deal with is of theoretical significance, as ALN is to date one of the few TLs that have been shown tractable. ALN is also a pragmatically significant extension of FL − , as it results from the addition of operators that, as argued e.g. in [17], are of considerable applicative interest. ...
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  • J G Schmolze
  • D Israel
  • Kl-One
The Entity Relationship Model
Reasoning Utility Package User’s Manual, MIT AI-Memo No 667
  • D A Mcallester