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Are digital natives a myth or reality? University students’ use of digital technologies

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Abstract

This study investigated the extent and nature of university students’ use of digital technologies for learning and socialising. The findings show that students use a limited range of mainly established technologies. Use of collaborative knowledge creation tools, virtual worlds, and social networking sites was low. ‘Digital natives’ and students of a technical discipline (Engineering) used more technology tools when compared to ‘digital immigrants’ and students of a non-technical discipline (Social Work). This relationship may be mediated by the finding that Engineering courses required more intensive and extensive access to technology than Social Work courses. However, the use of technology between these groups is only quantitatively rather than qualitatively different. The study did not find evidence to support popular claims that young people adopt radically different learning styles. Their attitudes to learning appear to be influenced by lecturers’ teaching approaches. Students appear to conform to traditional pedagogies, albeit with minor uses of tools delivering content. The outcomes suggest that although the calls for transformations in education may be legitimate it would be misleading to ground the arguments for such change in students’ shifting patterns of learning and technology use.

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... Hargittai et al. (2010) indicated that college students have high levels of confidence in their search engine choice; however, they do not feel the need to verify the information retrieved from their searches. Additionally, Blayone et al. (2017) reported that students' digital content creation skills were considered as lower intermediate, whilst Margaryan et al. (2011) indicated that the majority of university students preferred activities such as accessing content and using the Internet to communicate, rather than for the purposes of creating digital content. The next finding of these studies is that higher education students use ICT mostly for communication and collaboration. ...
... Additionally, research has shown that higher education students who balance their time on the Internet and employ a variety of tools, develop broader skills in terms of communication and collaboration (Armellini & De Stefani, 2015;Ellefsen, 2015). The literature has shown that students possess low-level competency in their use of major collaborative working tools (Blayone et al., 2017;Margaryan et al., 2011). ...
... The main reason put forward was that online collaboration tools, such as Web 2.0 tools, were considered too complex for them to be operated by users with VI. Studies conducted with sighted higher education students have also shown that they experienced problems with mastering digital collaborative working skills (López-Meneses et al., 2020;Margaryan et al., 2011). However, should students with VI have the ability to collaborate with others using the affordances of today's digital technologies, they could be better armed to address their social needs (Salas et al., 2002). ...
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... suggests that students may be underutilizing this resource (Margaryan et al., 2011;Pak et al., 2017). The introduction of VR to post-secondary institutions is still relatively new, and research is needed to unpack students' views of VR for learning, including the characteristics that drive differences in VR acceptance. ...
... Students may be aware that VR resources exist on their campuses, such as learning opportunities, training programs, and open-access makerspace labs, and yet still decide not to use these resources. Margaryan et al. (2011) administered a series of quantitative surveys to investigate the extent to which university students utilized various technologies for learning outside of a course. Their findings indicated that students tend to gravitate toward technologies they are already familiar with. ...
... Concerning the use of VR, the researchers found that 76% of the 160 students sampled reported "never" using simulations or games in informal learning scenarios. While Margaryan et al. (2011) documented such usage patterns prior to the VR "boom" of 2012, more recent research suggests this lack of exposure to VR among students persists. Pak et al. (2017) asked 239 university students to use a 5-point scale to rate the extent to which they had experience with various VR devices, with higher ratings representing greater usage. ...
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Post-secondary institutions are investing in and utilizing virtual reality (VR) for many educational purposes, including as a discretionary learning tool. Institutions such as vocational schools, community colleges, and universities need to understand what psychological factors drive students’ acceptance of VR for learning in discretionary contexts. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT; Venkatesh et al. in MIS Quarterly 27:425–478, 2003) offers a theoretical framework for understanding students’ receptivity to VR for learning. Undergraduate university students ( N = 300) read a description of VR and video training mediums, then indicated which they would choose to learn a novel task. Three psychological variables—performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence—tended to be related to acceptance of VR, which was measured in two ways: (a) rated intentions to use VR and (b) preference for VR over a video-based alternative. Relative weight analyses compared the importance of the three predictors and revealed that performance expectancy tended to be the most influential antecedent of VR acceptance.
... Blogs. Blogs are the most prevalent collaborative tools in the literature (Alharbi, 2015;Boling, Castek, Zawilinski, Barton, & Nierlich, 2008;Calvert, 2014;Clark, 2010;Collier, Foley, Moguel, & Barnard, 2013;Griffith, 2012;Margaryan, Littlejohn, & Voit, 2011;Martin & Lambert, 2015;Mills & Exley, 2014;Miyazoe & Anderson, 2012;Morton-Standish, 2014;Nobles & Paganucci, 2015). The use of blogs can be of benefit in writing instruction when utilized as multimodal presentation tools, and their instant publication allows creators to edit and revise content easily (Boling et al., 2008). ...
... Wikis. Wikis are highly useful and user-friendly presentation and collaboration tools mentioned in the literature (Alharbi, 2015;Boling et al., 2008;Kilpatrick et al., 2014;Margaryan et al., 2011;Martin & Lambert, 2015;Miyazoe & Anderson, 2012). As opposed to more traditional pencil-and-paper writing activities, wikis can motivate users to create and share content (Boling et al., 2008). ...
... These tools are frequently utilized in hybrid and online environments (Alharbi, 2015;Calvert, 2014;Comer, Clark, & Canelas, 2014;Jose & Abidin, 2016;Margaryan et al., 2011;Miyazoe & Anderson 2012). Online forum discussions can increase EFL students' interest and motivation in interacting with others. ...
Article
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This review of the literature aims to provide an overview of the technology used to enhance writing instruction in face-to-face and online environments. The research questions have the goal of finding the most widely utilized collaborative and multimodal tools described in the literature, and what benefits these tools bring to teaching and learning writing. Results reveal three main categories: collaboration and presentation tools, evaluation and feedback tools, and organization tools. This evolving technology can greatly enhance writing instruction and increase communication and collaboration practices between teachers and learners.
... For example, a person born after 1980 could be considered a digital immigrant if, having grown up in a depressed or rural area, in terms of access to technological resources, he or she was deprived of the regular use of digital media during his or her youth. However, many studies consider 1980 to be the objective chronological boundary between digital immigrants and digital natives [48][49][50][51][52][53]. Numerous studies show that the digital generation is a strongly influential variable in digital competence or in the perception, or frequency of use, of digital resources among professors [44,45]. ...
... For example, a person born after 1980 could be considered a digital immigrant if, having grown up in a depressed or rural area, in terms of access to technological resources, he or she was deprived of the regular use of digital media during his or her youth. However, many studies consider 1980 to be the objective chronological boundary between digital immigrants and digital natives [48][49][50][51][52][53]. This criterion is also assumed in this work, given that, as the research was carried out among a population of university professors, it is possible to assume that their social and economic environment is of intermediate or high level and, consequently, there are no reasons to think that there are socio-cultural circumstances, such as those mentioned, that alter the chronological criterion that distinguishes the digital generations defined. ...
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This paper presents quantitative research on the perception of the didactic use of virtual reality by university professors in Colombia, with special attention to the differences according to their area of knowledge, as the main variable, and gender and digital generation, as secondary variables. The study involved 204 professors from different Colombian universities. As an instrument, a survey designed for this purpose was used with four scales that were used to measure, on a Likert scale, different dimensions involving the participants’ perception of the use of virtual reality in the classroom. The answers were analyzed statistically and the differences in the perceptions have been identified by means of parametric statistical tests according to the following: (i) area of knowledge, (ii) gender, (iii) digital generation of the participants. The results showed that the participants expressed high valuations of virtual reality, despite having intermediate or low levels of digital competence. Gaps were identified in terms of area of knowledge, gender, and digital generation (digital natives or immigrants) with respect to opinions of virtual reality and digital competence. The highest valuations of virtual reality are given by professors of Humanities, and by digital natives. It is suggested that Colombian universities implement training plans on digital competence for professors and that these plans be aimed at strengthening knowledge of virtual reality.
... There is a general assumption that HE students are all digital natives and bring from their previous experiences the necessary digital competence to effectively cope with digital environments in their daily lives across different learning, leisure, working or citizenship contexts. However, different authors defy this myth (Jones et al., 2010;Kennedy et al., 2008;Kirschner & De Bruyckere, 2017;Margaryan et al., 2011), while others show that students do not master every area of digital competence as proposed, for instance, in DigComp (Evangelinos & Holley, 2016;Fawad, 2019;López-Meneses et al., 2020;Martzoukou et al., 2020). ...
... It can also be said that proficiency scores are low and need to be improved. As in other cases, these findings defy the notion that HE students have the necessary digital competences to effectively cope with digital environments and sustain that they may need much more support than it is generally assumed (JISC, 2020;Kirschner & De Bruyckere, 2017;Margaryan et al., 2011). This could be attained by infusing digital technologies for different pedagogic purposes or by defining curricula and training programmes with practical components requiring digital competences. ...
Article
Digital competence is among the basic key compe-tences for digital learning and employability. For this reason, its acquisition and development should be on the agenda of higher education institutions (HEIs) who wish to prepare their students to thrive in an ever faster evolving digital labour market. However, the existence of a valid instrument that can help HEIs measuring and further integrating digital competence into pedagogical and organisational practices with sufficient precision is yet to be accomplished. This article provides a valid and reliable instrument to measure higher education students' digital competence on the basis of the European Digital Competence Framework for Citizens, also known as DigComp. The instrument was applied to a sample of 411 students from a mid-large public HEI and the results attest its validity and reliability. In addition, the study explores proficiency differences among students from different fields of education and training, and gender. Results demys-tify the idea that ICT students are more digitally competent than those in other fields of study, but suggest males score higher than females, which feeds into the ongoing debate of gender differences in relation to digital technologies and the readiness of females for the digital labour market. The results lead to clear implications for research and practice. 2 | LUCAS et al.
... Many students in universities find electronic information resources useful because they are time-saving. [15] opined that students access the internet for different purposes such as to supplement notes given to them by lecturers, to complete class assignment, write projects and to communicate via e-mail. In this regard, [16] disclosed that there exits an increase in service delivery and exploitation of e-information resources because of the unavailability of the traditional print format. ...
... This implies that the perception and attitude of undergraduate students of undergraduate students affect their utilization of E-journals. This research finding is supported in the studies of [15] [22], that positive attitude towards a behavior could influence actual behavior, such as in their utilization of e-information resources such as e-journals among the respondents. Also, this buttresses the empirical study of [24] that it is imperative to comprehend attitude towards e-journals usage. ...
Article
This study sought to investigate the attitudinal behavior and perceptions of undergraduate students in University of Fort Hare and Rhodes, towards their utilization of e-information resources (EIRs). The essence was to ascertain whether their attitude and perception have a positive or negative impact on e-resource use in selected universities in Eastern Cape, South Africa. The purposive and proportionate stratified random sampling techniques were employed in selecting the study population and sample size while questionnaire and oral interview were used as instruments for data collection. The findings revealed that the respondents usually encounter difficulties which negatively influence their attitudes and behavior towards e-resource use. They assume that additional special computing skills are required before one can be competent enough to effectively utilize these resources. In carrying out this research, a total of 377 copies of the questionnaire were randomly distributed to undergraduate students in all the faculties of both institutions, and the results were analyzed using the Statistical Package of the social Sciences (SPSS Version 32). Additionally, hypotheses were tested in order to validly make assertions based on the collected data, and the results state that perception and attitude of undergraduate students affect their utilization of E-journals. Recommendations were made, and these include the need for mass enlightenment campaign on the use and benefits of E-resources among undergraduate students through training and retraining , seminars, and workshops.
... We found that, out of all challenges, those involving solving technical issues are the least frequently appeared. Margaryan et al. (2011) argued that students of a technical discipline (e.g., engineering) used more technology tools when compared to students of a non-technical discipline (e.g., social work) since intensive and extensive access to technology was necessary for students taking engineering courses. Furthermore, along with the students of a technical discipline, the faculty of engineering also appeared to be more confident in their technology skills when compared with the faculty of social work (Margaryan et al., 2011). ...
... Margaryan et al. (2011) argued that students of a technical discipline (e.g., engineering) used more technology tools when compared to students of a non-technical discipline (e.g., social work) since intensive and extensive access to technology was necessary for students taking engineering courses. Furthermore, along with the students of a technical discipline, the faculty of engineering also appeared to be more confident in their technology skills when compared with the faculty of social work (Margaryan et al., 2011). Therefore, it might be possible that challenges with solving technical issues were the least common challenges in our paper because the discipline of instructors from five out of eight studies in the review is natural and applied sciences, which is normally considered one of the technical disciplines. ...
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We are very happy to publish this issue of the International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research. The International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research is a peer-reviewed open-access journal committed to publishing high-quality articles in the field of education. Submissions may include full-length articles, case studies and innovative solutions to problems faced by students, educators and directors of educational organisations. To learn more about this journal, please visit the website http://www.ijlter.org. We are grateful to the editor-in-chief, members of the Editorial Board and the reviewers for accepting only high quality articles in this issue. We seize this opportunity to thank them for their great collaboration. The Editorial Board is composed of renowned people from across the world. Each paper is reviewed by at least two blind reviewers. We will endeavour to ensure the reputation and quality of this journal with this issue.
... However, to be digitally literate, one needs to not only to be able to use technology on a social level, but also be able to scrutinise and integrate digital information. This is where the issue lies for today's students who are often incorrectly referred to as 'digital natives' based on their assumed technological skills (Margaryan et al., 2011). However, what is seen is that while students are able to display expertise in conventional technology tools, they are unable to effectively assemble and comprehend information for learning purposes (Tang & Chaw, 2016). ...
... However, what is seen is that while students are able to display expertise in conventional technology tools, they are unable to effectively assemble and comprehend information for learning purposes (Tang & Chaw, 2016). Familiarity with technology alone is not enough for success in learning, having the right competencies and attitudes is equally important (Margaryan et al., 2011). Moreover, digital literacy is known to significantly contribute to student self-efficacy (SE) skills; these greatly support the requirement of self-directed learning in a BL experience (Prior et al., 2016). ...
Article
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As students transition into tertiary blended learning environments, their digital literacy in terms of technical capabilities have potential to impact on their access to digital resources. The first foundational year of STEM degrees includes compulsory courses across a broad range of scientific areas, each of which incorporates online technology in a discipline-specific manner. Given the diversity of online resources that STEM students need to access across their first-year coursework, this study applies learning analytical methods to determine whether students’ perceived level of digital literacy has an effect on their navigation of learning management systems (LMS) and overall academic performance. The frequency and nature of LMS interactivity were examined across four first-year STEM courses offered in the same semester at a single institution, using a K-means cluster analysis to group student responses. It was observed that high achieving students accessed LMS resources more frequently than mid or low-achieving students across all four STEM courses. Students’ perceived level of digital literacy was collected via survey (n = 282), and students were sorted high (n = 106) and low-level (n = 176) of perceived digital literacy—HDL and LDL, respectively. HDL students were not consistently found in the high-achieving academic group and did not perform better in their overall grade when compared to LDL students. LDL students were observed to perform better in specific online assessment tasks, which may be attributed to their increased frequency of LMS interactivity. These findings highlight the delicate balance between students’ perceived level of digital literacy, motivation for engaging with online learning environments, and academic performance.
... All of these contribute to lower perceptions of academic competence. While some consider this generation of students "digital natives" due to their use of digital technology for communication activities (e.g., social media) from an early age, students often have no prior experience with online learning and lack the skills necessary to successfully navigate and remain engaged in online learning environments (36,(54)(55)(56). Specifically, students lack competency in interacting with the learning content and constructing meaning (36,55). ...
Article
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ABSTRACT Test anxiety is a common experience shared by college students and is typically investigated in the context of traditional, face-to-face courses. However, the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the closure of universities, and many students had to rapidly shift to and balance the challenges of online learning. We investigated how the shift to online learning during the pandemic impacted trait (habitual) and state (momentary) test anxiety and whether there was variation across different demographic groups already vulnerable to performance gaps in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses. Quantitative analyses revealed that trait and state test anxiety were lower in Spring 2020 (COVID semester) than in Spring 2019 and were higher overall in women than men. We did not find a difference in either trait or state anxiety in first-generation students or among persons excluded because of ethnicity or race. Qualitative analyses revealed that student priorities shifted away from coursework during Spring 2020. While students initially perceived the shift to online learning as beneficial, 1 month after the shift, students reported more difficulties studying and completing their coursework. Taken together, these results are the first to compare reports of test anxiety during a traditional, undisrupted semester to the semester where COVID-19 forced a sudden transition online.
... They are, nevertheless, digital immigrants with varying levels of technology proficiency (Kumar & Bervell, 2019). According to Margaryan et al. (2011), millennials do not adapt as quickly to new technologies in the classroom as we might expect. As a result, how they adopt these tools has a direct impact on their behavioral intent and the learning process' success (Esteban-Millat et al. 2018). ...
Chapter
Understanding how to assess the learners' evaluation has become an essential topic for both academics and practitioners as blended mobile learning applications have proliferated. This study examines users' sentiment and predicts the review rating of the blended learning platform app using machine learning (ML) techniques. The data for this study came from Google Play Store reviews of the Google Classroom app. The VADER and AFINN sentiment algorithms were used to determine if the filtered summary sentences were positive, neutral, or negative. In addition, five supervised machine learning algorithms were used to differentiate user evaluations of the Google Classroom app into three sentiment categories in the current study. According to the results of this investigation, the majority of reviews for this app were negative. While all five machine learning algorithms are capable of correctly categorizing review text into sentiment ratings, the random logistic regression outperforms in terms of accuracy.
... he materails of digital sources. Fourth, Robertson, & Ellerbee, 2008) cite language as another challenge; computer technology comes with a set of jargon that is not frequently in a typical English class for starters. Fifth, Hosseini (2018) showed that the need of time in technology preparation lessons is important challenge in DLS teaching. Sixth, Margaryan, et. al (2011) hold that the lack of knowledge and low comprehension lead students to low DLS skills. Seventh, a key barrier in DLS is poor budgeting to buy technology. Alice (2012) assumed that college poor budgeting blocks an instructor from working wider platforms of technology. Finally, keeping up with technology. We live in an ever-changing world ...
Research
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Covid-19 has driven the globe in a new education-focused trend. Many advanced learning institutions in the present aspire to digital literacy as a result of the Covid-enforced shutdown in late-2020. Digital literacy is the ability to share, find, create, and evaluate content using the internet. Digital literacy is the literacy that demands a cognitive level to analyze, access, and make information from digital devices. This study attempts to find out the digital literacy skills used in Iraqi EFL University classrooms. The study sample is 150 4 th-year EFL undergraduates, of the College of Education for Human Sciences, Wasit University. Results illustrated that item 2 achieved the highest weighted mean (4.68. 93%). Meanwhile, item 19 got the lowest weighted mean (2.34. 46%). The study, therefore, recommends that instructors and students keep up to date, develop their own digital competencies, and understand how digital devices can help present information in their own native language.
... Interestingly, this very element of technology prone is associated with the preferable purposes for the use of technology (Margaryan et al., 2011). Whereby, the young age group is more likely involved in using technology for communication, networking, and entertainment purposes, thus, their quantitative technology use is not enough to support online learning, contrarily, those students [old age group] being involved in more of academic and professional use of technology, tend to be more self-efficient in online learning, that is evident from the findings of this study as well. ...
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This paper presents the self-efficacy for online learning during the pandemic, across two age groups young (25 and below) and old (above 25) from different schools and universities in Sindh based on five constructs of self-efficacy. These constructs include completion of online courses, social interaction among students, academic interaction among students, interaction with instructors, and handling online tools of course management. This was a quantitative study with a web-based survey. The population of the study was school and university students of Sindh aging from 18 onwards and have taken online classes. The sample (n=162) was selected conveniently. And the data were gathered using an adopted questionnaire of self-efficacy for online learning (SeQoL) which has an excellent Cronbach's alpha value (0.947). The analysis was done by exploratory, descriptive, and inferential analysis. The study results reveal that the old group has shown higher (M= 3.07; SD= 0.57) self-efficacy for online learning compared to their younger counterparts (M= 2.72; SD= 0.54). The difference was found to be significant (p<0.001) with a medium magnitude (r=0.321). Therefore, the paper concludes that both age groups have a certain level of self-efficacy for online learning. However, the older students have higher self-efficacy than their counterparts. This study presents some limitations and recommendations for policy and practice levels and future studies.
... Prensky [62] dates the time point that differentiates the two digital generations to 1980; those born after that date are considered digital natives and the rest are digital immigrants. Following Prensky's original work, many studies interested in analyzing the digital divide between the aforementioned generations have taken 1980 as the date that differentiates them [64][65][66][67][68][69][70][71][72][73][74]. The distinction between digital generations depends on age as well as on the socio-cultural aspects involved. ...
This paper conducts quantitative research on the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on the adaptation to digital learning environments (DLE) of a group of 908 university professors. We compared the perceptions of participants who were digital natives (born before 1980) with those of digital immigrants (born after 1980). For this purpose, a validated survey was used and the obtained responses statistically analyzed. The results show a negative correlation between pandemic stress and the digital competence of professors and their adaptation skills to digital environments, which although weak for both of the two groups compared are stronger for digital immigrants. Both self-confidence and digital competence show a positive influence on the perception of adaptation of skills to DLE, and this is weaker in digital natives. Gaps were identified by gender and area of knowledge of the participants; consequently, the need to carry out training actions for university faculty on skills linked to their digital competence in teaching is clear.
... As information technology becomes increasingly ubiquitous, it is recognised that there is a pressing need to utilize digital technologies in teaching and learning in a manner that is responsive to the needs of today's learners (Gallardo-Echenique et al., 2015). It is generally accepted that internet devices such as computers, mobile phones and tablets have potential to support learning (Margaryan et al., 2011). As we live on the verge of the fourth industrial revolution (Chung & Kim, 2016), digital technology now permeates through almost every facet of human activity, from industry to entertainment and communication, therefore, it seems that it is the right way to go, even in teaching and learning. ...
Conference Paper
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Based on research studies that have found that continuing professional development (CPD) offerings do not always align with what teachers’ desire, this study explored the kinds of activities that teachers preferred in these offerings. The study was situated in adult learning theories and functional context theory. A quantitative research design was employed. The teachers were participants in a CPD initiative, and 51 teachers participated in the survey. Data was gathered utilising a questionnaire. Results indicate that these teachers highly preferred engaging in learning to better themselves as teachers, improve the achievement scores of their learners and improve their own subject content knowledge. Teachers predominantly prefer to learn through experimenting in their own classrooms and by reflecting on their own practice, by collaborating with other teachers at their own schools and, to a lesser extent, by participating in other CPD activities. The conclusion is that these teachers prefer to engage in CPD activities closely linked to their classroom practice
... Digital technology immersion is not age-dependent, since elder populations could grow accustomed to it, while younger generations can focus on a smaller number of new technologies and their characteristics (Margaryan et al., 2011). ...
Article
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Many seem to believe that today’s pre-service teachers as born after 1980 are digital natives, or that they are “native speakers” of the digital language. Nevertheless, there is no evidence that their digital native characteristics determine whether or not they would use technology in the classroom. Although not widely evaluated, the four-factor, 21-item Digital Nativity Assessment Scale (DNAS) was one of the first instruments to assess digital nativeness (DN). This study aim is to explore the influence of pre-service teachers’ DN on their intention to use technology in the future classroom in Serbia, by evaluating the DNAS on Serbian sample and using it for measuring the DN. Six variables were incorporated to examine their mutual relationships based on technology acceptance model: digital nativeness, behavioral intention (BI), perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PEU), subjective norm (SN), and technological complexity (TC). Data were collected from 688 pre-service teachers in Serbia. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed a four-factor model for the DNAS, and Serbian pre-service teachers demonstrated a high level of DN. To evaluate the hypothesized model structural equation modeling was utilized. The suggested model had a good fit for describing the BI of Serbian pre-service teachers, accounting for 27.1% of the variance in BI. It was found that direct dominant predictors of BI are digital native traits, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use. Significant influence of digital native traits on all other variables in the model was also confirmed. The implications for theory and practice are discussed.
... This is because they tend not to have the capacity to realistically appraise both the demands of the task and their learning needs to select the appropriate strategies. Furthermore, recent studies (Kennedy and Fox, 2013;Margaryan, Littlejohn and Vojt, 2011) have also reported that though digital learners appear to use a large number of technologies, they are using them primarily for personal empowerment and entertainment, not so much to support their learning. These studies support our findings that students disagree on their ability to self-reflect on their learning, identify learning strategies that work for them, and use technologies to learn. ...
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This paper reports on the evaluation results of the implementation of the Parallel Curriculum Model (PCM) in a Singapore secondary school for Grades 7-10. PCM was adopted by the school in 2016 to provide a comprehensive framework for designing the school’s curriculum around the core, connections, practice, and identity. Two years into the implementation, a systematic review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this model on students’ learning. A 39-item 5-point scale survey instrument was conceptualized to measure students’ self-perception around four constructs—(a) critical and conceptual thinking, (b) problem solving and communication, (c) creative thinking, and (d) learning strategies adopted in the context of PCM curriculum. Rasch analysis of 862 students’ level of agreeability to these four constructs reported positive self-views. They also reported engaging effective learning strategies in the PCM curriculum. This study contributes to the paucity of research in evaluating the efficacy of the PCM on students’ learning.
... As mentioned before, modern digital learners have constant access to their smartphones and laptops or desktop computers (Oliver & Goerke, 2007;Kennedy et al, 2009). However, according to Margaryan, Littlejohn & Vojt (2011), the type of use that they are doing is use is mostly quantitative and not qualitative and thus, in learning they are influenced by the instructional techniques that their teachers utilize. Moreover, the type of uses that they carry out with technologies, as well as the type of interactions that they achieve through them constitute the digital learners very diverse and evolving (Maton, 2010). ...
Chapter
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This chapter addresses two forces in contemporary societies. The first is that societies today are characterized by cultural and linguistic diversity and increasing human mobility. In this complex setting, language learning has acquired more significance, with the need to communicate worldwide. Secondly, our society is experiencing dramatic technological advancements, one of which pertains to online learning. In this era of ubiquitous learning, where the use of learning management systems, mobile applications, social networks, and other digital technologies can underpin learning, it is necessary to re-address language learning. This overview will categorize the types of online language learning tools and practices that are emerging and prevalent and it will analyze their instructional approaches in the use of the technology. Ιt will also focus on the digital learners that access them having as an ultimate goal to understand the characteristics and needs of the contemporary global, multilingual, and digital learners and how these can be addressed in the learning process.
... [37] Recommended that in the current era of digital technology, modern teaching methods such as simulation trainers should be integrated into dental education as is the standard in other businesses such as aviation or automobile traffic [4]. However, [38][39] advised against a radical shift from conventional teaching methods to digital technologies, as demanded by [40,41]. ...
Article
Background: The implementation of digital technologies in dental curricula has started globally and reached varying levels of penetration counting on local resources and demands. One of the biggest challenges in digital education is the need to continuously adapt and adjust to the developments in technology and apply these to dental practice in communicating with dental professionals, medical doctors, dental technicians, and insurance providers, dental students need to be prepared to manage digitized data, ensure patient safety, and understand the advantages and limitations of conventional and digital processes. Aim: To create awareness about digital teaching methodology among the dental students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among the adolescent population with a sample size of 120. A self administered structured questionnaire was prepared based on digital teaching methodology and consisted of 13 questions. It was circulated to participants through an online platform (google form). The statistics were done using SPSS software, chi-square test was used to check the association and P value of 0.05 was said to be statistically significant.The pros of the survey is that the adolescents of different lifestyles and cultures were surveyed. Children and adults were excluded from the survey. Simple random sampling method was the sampling method used to minimise the sampling bias. Results: The results showed that the dental students are aware about the digital teaching methodology. Conclusion: The people are aware of the digital teaching methodology. But more awareness needs to be spread so that digital handling can be improvised in the near future.
... Todellisuus kuitenkin on, että nuorten kokemus ja osaaminen vaihtelevat hyvin paljon ja taidoissa on merkittävästi vaihtelua jo peruskoulussa (Tanhua-Piiroinen ym., 2017). Niin kutsuttuja diginatiiveja ei ole löydettävissä nuorista sukupolvista ainakaan siten kuin se on aikaisemmassa tutkimuksessa sekä mediassa esitetty (Margaryan, Littlejohn & Vojt, 2011; Bennett, Maton & Kervin, 2008). Kyse ei ole pelkästään digitaalisista 5.5.2022 ...
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Artikkelissa tarkastellaan kielten aineenopettajaopiskelijoiden muuttuvia käsityksiä koulutusteknologiasta. Käsityksiä teknologian opetuskäytöstä on viime aikoina muovannut erityisesti koronapandemia. Artikkelissa perehdytään aiheeseen kahden laadullisen esseeaineiston avulla, joista toinen on kerätty syksyllä 2018 ennen pandemiaa ja toinen syksyllä 2020 koronapandemian aikana. Esseissä kielten aineenopettajaopiskelijat käsittelevät suhtautumistaan koulutusteknologiaa kohtaan. Tutkimuksen tuloksia voidaan hyödyntää opettajien tutkintokoulutuksen sekä täydennyskoulutusten suunnittelussa ja kehittämisessä.
... On the contrary, an investigation by Margaryan, Littlejohn, and Vojt (2011) on the extent and nature of university students' use of digital technologies for learning and socializing show that students use a limited range of established technologies with the use of collaborative knowledge creation tools, virtual worlds, and social networking sites very low Kennedy, et al., (2006) reported that while most students regularly use established and available digital technologies such as email and Web searching tools, only a small subset of students use more advanced or newer digital technologies such as such as augmented reality, games and simulations. ...
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IAFOR Journal of Education: Volume 5 – Issue 1 Editor: Bernard Montoneri, Tamkang University, Taiwan Published: March 1, 2017 ISSN: 2187-0594 https://doi.org/10.22492/ije.5.1 https://iafor.org/journal/iafor-journal-of-education/volume-5-issue-1/
... However, the access and use of technologies by users, and in this specific case, by students and teachers does not depend only on the degree of development of the country in question, but also on the generation of individuals [19] that may be more or less apt and receptive in wanting to develop knowledge in this area. In this orientation, Margaryan et al. [20] referred to the lack of digital skills, systemic problems, and the reluctance to change, as the main constraints pointed out by teachers in higher education, from the United Kingdom, for the non-use of technologies. In this sense, Centeio [21] mentions that the digital gap is a transversal phenomenon to teachers and students, so it must be considered as a problem of great relevance to be solved by governmental entities. ...
Conference Paper
The confinement caused by the spread of the disease COVID-19 transformed the way of teaching in the education sector during confinement, leading to the intensification of the development of virtual learning. This includes the use of many educational tools, applications, and Websites at zero cost for its users, the emergence of the STEM (STEAMeducation is a revolutionary approach that respects the particularities of students allowing them to develop different skills simultaneously, streamlining and optimizing teaching to make it much more complete) lockdown digital school and the emergence of remote education. Although knowledge and use and information and communication technologies (ICT) are considered a premise for the good performance of students in working life, complete knowledge is only achieved with active participation and accompanied by the pedagogical aspect that teachers are capable of impute to the teaching/learning process, which does not always happen because not all students and teachers are equipped with these technological tools, or even due to social and cultural reasons. Regarding the advantages and disadvantages of using technology to teach and learn, we will see that the use of technologies is a competitive advantage for students while they are in the education system and for those who need those same technologies in the performance of their profession. Still and in order to analyze the technologies at the service of education, as well as the goals foreseen for the coming years, we verified that action plans must be introduced that, covering a significant number of the active population, provide external and independent training fromthe education system. Compulsory education that makes contact with ICT by interested parties a reality.
... More experienced colleagues and administrators may place undue pressures on novice teachers due to these misperceptions of their abilities to "natively" use technology. However, questions have been raised by some researchers about the reality of their supposed digital native status (Helsper & Enyon, 2010;Margaryan et al., 2011). College students' proclivities for using digital technologies in their day-to-day lives likely do not actually translate well into teaching with technology Lambert & Gong, 2010). ...
... Los desafíos de enseñar Química en la Era Digital L os estudiantes de la llamada "Generación Digital", tienen destacadas habilidades tecnológicas que deben ser aprovechadas por los docentes universitarios, en todas sus especialidades (Margaryan, 2011;Schneider, 2011;Lotherington, 2011). En este sentido, existen varias universidades en el mundo, que tienen incorporado en el Currículo, actividades utilizando tecnología de impresión en tres dimensiones (3D) para diferentes asignaturas. ...
Article
Las nuevas generaciones de la Era Digital tienen un lenguaje y manera de comunicarse interactivo y ágil. Es importante innovar en los métodos de enseñanza, y aprovechar las capacidades y habilidades que ellos poseen. El objetivo de este trabajo fue desarrollar una plataforma interactiva, implementada como sitio web , que pueda ser utilizada por estudiantes universitarios del área de la ingeniería y ciencias, para aprender la estequiometría de las reacciones, y comprender las estructuras de las moléculas químicas, mediante impresión 3D. La metodología consistió en dos trabajos principales: 1) el desarrollo de un software interactivo para formular reacciones químicas equilibradas, en formato para sitio web, y 2) el diseño en 3D de moléculas. Las moléculas fueron diseñadas de manera de ser autoexplicativas, utilizando como base moléculas diseñadas en el sitio web de libre uso MolView, y otras utilizando la Teoría de Repulsión de Pares de Electrones de Valencia (TREPEV). Se logró desarrollar una plataforma interactiva llamada “Química 3D”, en la cual se podrán formular todas las reacciones posibles, el estudiante ingresará los reactantes y productos de la reacción, y mediante un algoritmo se generarán tres alternativas de coeficientes estequiométricos, con una alternativa correcta. El estudiante debe escoger la alternativa correcta, para tener acceso para visualizar las moléculas en imagen con diseño 3D, y además descargar el archivo para impresora 3D Makerbot, y de esta manera comprender su geometría espacial y estructura.
... As information technology becomes increasingly ubiquitous, it is recognised that there is a pressing need to utilize digital technologies in teaching and learning in a manner that is responsive to the needs of today's learners (Gallardo-Echenique et al., 2015). It is generally accepted that internet devices such as computers, mobile phones and tablets have potential to support learning (Margaryan et al., 2011). As we live on the verge of the fourth industrial revolution (Chung & Kim, 2016), digital technology now permeates through almost every facet of human activity, from industry to entertainment and communication, therefore, it seems that it is the right way to go, even in teaching and learning. ...
... suggested that students in South Korean universities who are familiar with digital technology may also sometimes be unable to cope with digital technology in their online academic engagement, and this will affect their academic literacy. Presently, there is a large gap between digital skills in informal contexts and informal learning among many ODL students in higher education institutions (Margaryan et al., 2011). Digital readiness for ODL students includes the significant use of digital skills for academic study, the digital medium ability through active engagement and ability to engage digital culture, and the ability to apply information skills and strategies in academic work. ...
... Algunos estudios sobre las tecnologías digitales en adolescentes y jóvenes avalan que utilizan diversas herramientas digitales, aprenden, se comunican y comparten contenidos a través de internet González-Ramírez y López-Gracia, 2018). Sin embargo, la suposición de que existe una generación de personas jóvenes que se caracterizan por su familiaridad y confianza con las tecnologías digitales, con altos niveles de alfabetización digital y que tienen diferentes estilos de aprendizaje y características de comportamiento, ha sido cuestionada internacionalmente sobre la base de estudios como los de Bennett et al. (2008), Helsper y Eynon (2010), Margaryan et al., 2011o Thompson (2013. Estos estudios concluyen, de modo general, que los/as estudiantes tienen una diversidad de niveles de uso de la tecnología que no implica, necesariamente, un gran conocimiento de las mismas ni una adecuada alfabetización digital. ...
Article
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Coords: María S. Ramírez-Montoya, Rory McGreal & Jane-Frances Obiageli Agbu This Special Issue aims to analyze the possible digital horizons that can be glimpsed in the future of education 4.0 based on UNESCO recommendations. In particular, the recommendations of open educational resources (OER) as strategic support for digital transformation. Articles that contribute to the knowledge of education 4.0, open educational resources, open science and digital transformation practices are also presented. The contributions are intended to be of value to the academic, scientific, and social community, interested in proposing new possibilities for a quality, open, inclusive and supportive education.
... When online learning became 'the new normal' due to a worldwide pandemic, established teaching contexts, forms of interaction and approaches had to be revaluated and transformed. Previous reasons for university teachers' hesitance to integrate digital tools, such as a lack of digital skills, systemic problems, and a reluctance to change (Margaryan et al., 2011), no longer sufficed due to the exclusivity of the online learning environments. ...
Article
Open access article availabe from: https://www.ph-vorarlberg.ac.at/forschung/ueberblick/fe-edition This article explores the foreign language learning potentials that selected digital tools hold with respect to teaching about U.S. structural racism. Teaching complex topics like structural racism in online learning environments requires highly competent foreign language teachers and high-quality online learning materials. These demands and resulting digital teaching innovations have a significant effect on how university-based (foreign language) teacher training should be structured in the future (Amhag et al., 2019). To address these demands, we have integrated distance teaching as a mandatory element in foreign language teacher training at the Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt (Stadler-Heer & Böttger, 2021). This article presents exemplary online lessons on the topic of structural racism which were developed, tested, and evaluated by pre-service teachers in two remote university teacher training courses. Drawing on the principles of task-based language teaching, the presented digital lesson materials aim to foster secondary school students’ intercultural communicative competence.
... That said, other countries, like Sweden and Canada, were early adopters and have been front runners in implementing WSI and DP in primary diagnostics since mid of the 00's [21][22][23] with an early success for frozen sections [24]. Digital technologies are not necessarily age dependent, and all ages may become comfortable with new technologies [25,26], as our study also showed. DP in Denmark was neither a field domineered by any sex as may be expected in an IT-related field [27]. ...
Article
Digital pathology (DP) is changing pathology departments dramatically worldwide, yet globally, few departments are presently digitalized for the full diagnostic workflow. Denmark is also on the road to full digitalization countrywide, and this study aim to cover experiences during the implementation process in a national context. Thus, quantitative questionnaires were distributed to all pathology departments in Denmark (n = 13) and distributed to all professions including medical clinical directors, medical doctors (MD) and biomedical laboratory scientists (BLS). For a qualitative perspective, we interviewed four employees representing four professions. Data were collected in 2019-2020. From the questionnaire and interviews, we found strategies differed at the Danish departments with regards to ambitions, technological equipment, workflows, and involvement of type of professions. DP education was requested by personnel. Informants were in general positive toward the digital future but mainly had concerns regarding the political pressure to integrate DP before technological advances are sufficient for maintaining rational budgets, workflows, and for sustaining diagnostic quality. This study is a glance on the Danish implementation process in its early stages from personnel's point of view. It shows the complexity when large new workflow processes are to be implemented countrywide and with a large diversity of stakeholders like managers, MD, BLS, IT-professionals, and authorities. To ensure best technological and economical solutions and to maintain-or even optimize-diagnostic quality with DP and workflow alignment, we suggest superior inter- and intradepartmental communication. When implementing DP countrywide, a national working group is warranted with the variety of stakeholders represented.
... Technology adoption and use in educational settings is not only about implementing topdown policy initiatives or acknowledging structural aspects that affect technology use, or even about adjusting pedagogical practices to better engage technology-savvy learners (Bayne & Ross, 2007;Margaryan, Littlejohn & Vojt, 2011). In contrast to the notion of a disappearing teacher, the embodied teacher plays a pivotal role in technology adoption, as Somekh argues that it is "teachers who change practices" (2008, p. 452 knowledge about pedagogy and technology is also an essential ingredient (e.g., Tseng, 2019). ...
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Teachers across a wide range of educational, geographic and practice contexts are being confronted with technologies that have the potential to both disrupt and transform their classrooms, relationship to students, and their own understandings of themselves as professionals. As educational technologies become more integrated into the teaching and learning of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) at universities, developing better understandings of why and in what ways teachers implement and use them can support this integration in constructive ways for both teachers and learners. This thesis explores the idea that interrogating teachers’ ideas about who they are, their identities, may shed light on how they perceive, engage with, and choose whether and to what extent to adopt technologies in the context of their educational practice. This approach may also be useful in supporting EAP teachers’ learning and integration of technology in ways that enhance their practice and relationships to students. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), this study explores the experiences of university EAP teachers using Moodle in their teaching practice. It seeks to develop a clearer understanding of the identities they construct within the context of the language centre of a large European research university. This research also explores the construct of identity as a means of understanding educational technology adoption and use, an approach that has not been widely explored to date, as well as the usefulness of IPA as a methodology suitable for interrogating such experiences within the field of Education. Over the course of a single semester, six EAP teachers took part in focus groups and individual interviews and provided written narratives through which they shared their experiences and individual journeys, their aspirations, frustrations, and changes in their teaching practices. Using IPA data analysis, these narratives together were used to create idiographic sketches of each participant and to develop a detailed analysis of both convergence and divergence of themes across the participants. The study found that participants’ experience of educational technology is always viewed in light of their teaching practices and their relationships to students. It also suggests that professional precarity and beliefs in unsubstantiated myths such as the “digital native” may constitute barriers to teachers’ educational technology integration. These findings support a useful role for identity, conceived as a holistic model incorporating various aspects of a teacher’s being and doing, in not only understanding but also supporting these technology-related practices. The results generate recommendations for practice, including first and foremost that professional learning and support for technology integration begin with teachers, their ideas about themselves, and their concrete practices rather than the technologies themselves. Keywords: Educational Technology, English for Academic Purposes (EAP), Higher Education Teaching, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), Language Teacher Identity, Teacher Identity, Technology Integration
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Young People are still referred to as digital natives, although numerous studies have shown differences in their access to digital devices, Internet usage and attitude towards digitalisation. Such differences can lead to digital inequalities. In higher education digital inequalities among students are scarcely researched as it is assumed that university students possess crucial digital competencies which they have acquired at school and in everyday life through the use of digital devices and applications. However, research findings suggest that students cannot directly transfer their digital skills to their study situation. The presented study aims to measure the degree of digitalisation by means of an index, the DDS-Index, which was developed in the context of a large-scale survey among first-semester students in Austria (n=4,822). The DDS-Index maps the degree of digitalisation of students on a range of 0 to 100 points. This paper outlines the development and assessment of the DDS-Index and uses it to analyse differences in the degree of digitalisation of students in order to draw conclusions about a digital divide at universities.
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Background: ICT has become crucial in our everyday life and for that matter teaching and learning. It is, therefore, imperative to examine its involvement in education. Purpose: The current study sought to explore the influence of teachers' self-efficacy and attitude towards the integration of ICT into teaching and learning at the basic school level. Method: The study was a descriptive survey with a sample size of 159 teachers representing 270 accessible population which was purposively located. Respondents responded to the questionnaire via an online survey in the quest for data collection. Data to answer research questions and test research hypotheses were analyzed using frequencies, percentages, means, standard deviations, and Pearson Product Moment Correlational Coefficient. Findings: The study revealed that most teachers have a high level of self-efficacy. The study also found that majority of the teachers have positive attitudes toward the integration of ICT in teaching and learning. However, it was revealed that there is a significant difference between male and female teachers’ attitudes towards the integration of ICT in teaching and learning. Finally, there is no significant relationship between self-efficacy and teachers’ attitudes toward the integration of ICT in teaching and learning. Recommendation: Based on the findings, it was, therefore, included in the recommendations that to successfully incorporate ICT into teaching and learning, policymakers must offer the essential teaching and learning tools to teachers.
Conference Paper
Taking into account the findings on the digital divide in Vietnam (Do et al. [1]), as well as the methodology of digital transformation in higher education in Germany (Bond et al. [2]) and the direction of a human rights-based approach (Peeraer and Van [3], Kristin and Ingunn [4]), we carried out this research on the association between digital transformation in education and human rights. The research will first analyze a university’s digital transformation status in a mountainous region of Vietnam, where the majority and ethnic minorities are evenly distributed. The research also specifies the 4A requirements of educational access, which include availability, accessibility, acceptability, and adaptation based on the existing state of institutions, infrastructure, and lecturer and student individual characteristics. The findings of the research are intended to draw practical lessons, offer recommendations, and equip instructors and students with skills as digital citizens in the modern age, as well as policy proposals in the sectors of education and human rights. This research also addresses some of the shortcomings of earlier research on identifying behavioral trends in the usage of digital technologies on a limited basis.
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Some studies (Grgurović, 2011; Banados, 2006; Chenoweth et al., 2006) have showed that blended instruction would enhance language learning. Similarly, some researchers (Picciano, 2009; Goertler, 2012; Neumeier, 2005) have defined blended instruction and recommended that educators try the best blend for their classes. Motivated by the findings of the relevant literature on blended instruction, the current study aims to find whether blended learning would make a difference in the writing scores of students compared to traditional face-to-face education and to establish the students’ perspective on the usage of technology at writing courses with quantitative and qualitative research methods. For the purpose of the study, one experimental and control groups were chosen from the School of Foreign Languages, Gaziantep University. The 13 students in the experimental groups are taught writing with blended learning, while 13 students are taught writing with traditional face-to-face education for one month. The students in both groups have the same schedule, age, English level, and classroom facilities. The results of the analysis done by SPSS show that the experimental group's writing scores are higher than the control group's writing scores. To learn the students’ perspectives in the experimental group, semi-structured interviews have been done after the experience. The results show that the students are not satisfied with the usage of current technology at writing courses. On the other hand, they reported they were satisfied with blended learning. The students also gave some suggestions about the implications of technology in and outside of the classes.
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While various forms of smart home technology have been available for decades, they have yet to achieve widespread adoption. Although they have risen in popularity during recent years, the general public continue to rate smart home devices as overly complex compared to their benefits. This article reports the results of an eight-month study into the effects of training on smart home technology adoption. Building upon the results of a previous study, and using the same living laboratory approach, we studied the effects of training on the attitudes of a group of residents toward use of smart home technology. Results show that training influences those attitudes toward smart home technology, including increased confidence in future use, and increased actual use of more complex smart home features. Results also indicate that users tended to seek out other users rather than training materials for advice, and that privacy concerns were not a deterrent to using smart home devices.
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Digital educational games (DEGs) constitute an effective teaching approach, particularly when they are used in combination with collaborative learning scenarios. However, when changes are made in the teaching and learning process, teachers are responsible to apply and realize them in practice. Therefore, it is vital to understand their views and attitudes on the matter, regardless if they are pre-or in-service teachers. In this work, a questionnaire was used for gathering data from 263 undergraduate students from Departments of Education in Greece, regarding their views about the use of DEGs for collaborative learning. It was found that their attitude was between neutral and slightly positive. On the other hand, their intention to use DEGs for collaborative learning was positive. It was also found that whether they consider DEGs useful and their attitude toward DEGs, were significant determinants of their intention to use them. Gender and the frequency of playing games had an impact on how useful they consider DEGs to be, while age had an impact only on pre-service teachers' attitudes toward the use of DEGs for collaborative learning.
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There are obstacles that are delaying the implementation of mobile health (mHealth) in Saudi Arabia. For instance, mobile health cannot be effectively implemented if patients’ behavioural intentions are not taken into account, as patients’ attitudes and persistence are important for the successful introduction of any IT application. Indeed, the topic of mobile health acceptance, in the particular case of Saudi Arabia, has not been adequately investigated, despite the availability of some general research on the acceptance of technology. Therefore, the present study adopted the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model with the aim of identifying the determinants of mobile health application acceptance. The UTAUT model identified a selection of factors that influenced the uptake of mobile health services. Performance expectancy, effort expectancy, facilitating conditions, system quality and trust in the ICT system were all positively influential. However, social factors did not appear to affect the behavioural intention to use mobile health.
Chapter
Der Beitrag thematisiert digitale Ungleichheiten im Hochschulbereich im Anschluss an die Digital Divide Forschung. Es werden Unterschiede in der technischen Ausstattung, Nutzung digitaler Angebote und der Selbsteinschätzung der digitalen Kompetenzen auf Basis einer Stichprobe von 6.944 österreichischen Studierenden adressiert und auf soziodemografische Einflüsse hin analysiert. Zudem wird untersucht, ob der Studienfortschritt einen Einfluss auf den Digitalisierungsgrad der Studierenden hat.
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Purpose Continuous training in professional teaching competencies has become one of the challenges of the school of the 21st century, especially if we refer to the mastery of digital competence. The aim of this study is to analyze the degree of digital competence of secondary school teachers of different areas of knowledge during the global pandemic of COVID-19 in the Galician autonomous community and obtain data that allow us to infer whether there is an association between individual variables such as age, gender, degree, work experience and their mastery of digital competence. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional descriptive quasi-experimental study is performed using an accidental sample of secondary school teachers from different fields of knowledge. Findings The different results obtained determine that the level of knowledge and use of digital media and tools is low. There are no significant differences depending on the variables analyzed, but it is necessary to establish specific continuing education plans for the improvement of digital competence in secondary school teachers to enable the effective use and management of information and communication technologies in future professionals. Originality/value Therefore, the findings of this study allow the development of educational interventions focused on increasing the digital competence of teachers, taking into account their individual characteristics.
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Information literacy at the higher education level is very important because it tends to be problematic in fostering students' critical thinking skills, including awareness, collection, understanding, analysis, synthesis, and the use of information and their attitudes to the treatment of information at the university level. This study examined the effects of the online learning Google Classroom in enhancing information literacy among students. This study observed a one-group pretest-posttest experimental design. This research involved 65 students from the Chemistry Course under the Biochemistry Program. The instrument used to assess students’ information literacy consist of fair set of multiple-choice questions. The test was found to be very valid at 4.22% and highly reliable at an alpha level of 0.86. The findings of this research showed that the information literacy of students improved before and after their learning exposure using Google Classroom based on the descriptive and inferential statistics. Moreover, the students' attitude towards the online platform shows that they are more willing to learn using Google Classroom than the non-online or conventional learning platforms. Therefore, applying Google Classroom in online learning is effectively boost students’ information literacy.
Chapter
The World Economic Forum's 2018 report indicated that students will need to be prepared for a rapidly changing, technology-filled world in which their future jobs likely do not yet exist. Recent education reform initiatives have focused on preparing the workforce for 21st century jobs by improving STEM literacy and acknowledging the importance of teacher preparation. Unfortunately, many teachers, designers, and technologists have not been trained in the same ways as they are expected to prepare students, and training opportunities are often delivered in traditional, business-as-usual formats. To better prepare individuals to prepare students, reimagining traditional educational delivery and modalities, while integrating STEM, making, and play to encourage the development and practice of 21st century skills may prepare those adult learners build toward the future. This chapter will discuss administrative and curricular changes we made geared toward meeting our adult audiences' needs in a teacher education program following their learning preferences.
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Thesis
L’expérience étudiante non-académique est devenue un levier incontournable au sein des écoles de commerce françaises pour faire face aux transformations de leur marché, comme en témoigne l’évolution des comportements des étudiants. Ces derniers, appartenant à la génération Z, possèdent des usages digitaux qui impactent directement leurs attentes vis-à-vis des établissements. Dans ce cadre, proposer des services non-académiques numériques de bonne qualité devient central pour influencer la satisfaction étudiante.Ce travail est réalisé dans le cadre d’un dispositif CIFRE au sein d’un cabinet de conseil en stratégie et s’appuie sur une méthodologie mixte au travers d’une recherche-intervention et d’une étude quantitative. Les résultats mettent en avant l’impact positif de la qualité perçue des services numériques non-académiques sur la satisfaction étudiante, les services associés à la vie quotidienne ayant la plus grande d’influence. Un biais de surconfiance est également démontré : les étudiants de la génération Z surestiment leurs compétences numériques. Enfin, la méconnaissance de l’offre de services disponible nuit à la satisfaction.
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With the increasing significance of technology use in both daily life and education, the digital native assessment scale (DNAS) [developed by Teo, T. (2013). An initial development and validation of a Digital Natives Assessment Scale (DNAS). Computers & Education, 67, 51–57.] has been widely used as a tool to investigate the digital nativeness of different subjects/participants and in different languages worldwide. The current study aimed to continue exploring the cross-cultural invariance of DNAS in the Vietnamese version (V-DNAS) and examine the digital nativeness of Vietnamese pre-service teachers. Using two sources of validity evidence from cognitive response processes and the internal structure of validity of DNAS, the study findings showed that the DNAS, in general, had an adequate model fit in the Vietnamese version, which contributed to confirm the invariance of the scale in different languages. The study also showed that Vietnamese pre-service teachers endorsed all elements of digital nativeness in general, with a significant difference by students’ geographic locations. The study provided contributions for scale validation research and teacher education, alongside suggestions for future research to avoid its limitations.
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The Operation and Maintenance (O&M) phase can account for as much as 80% of the overall lifecycle cost of a project. The inputs from O&M practitioners are often not incorporated during the design phase leading to maintainability issues during the O&M phase, which results in significant costs and hinders building performance. Traditionally, design communication with practitioners is conducted using 2D drawings and in some more advanced projects, with Building Information Models (BIMs). Virtual Reality (VR) has the potential to facilitate maintainability-focused design input from O&M practitioners, but this application has not been studied in detail. This paper addresses the gap by examining the usability of VR for providing access-related maintainability inputs. A quasi-experimental approach was adopted to evaluate the difference in access-related inputs provided by sixteen O&M practitioners, once using 2D drawings and BIM and again using VR. We assessed the variation in time for O&M practitioners to provide the inputs and the perceived quality of the inputs using the two design communication methods. We also examined the effect of practitioners' years of experience on providing access-related maintainability inputs using VR. The results suggest that there was no statistically significant difference in the access-related maintainability inputs provided using the two design communication methods, which demonstrates that O&M practitioners could provide similar access-related inputs using VR and traditional means of communication using 2D drawings and 3D models. The results also show that O&M practitioners were able to provide inputs significantly faster using VR. The O&M practitioners also reported that VR facilitated ease of use and high confidence in their inputs. Furthermore, the practitioners' years of experience did not lead to any variation in the access-related inputs provided and the time efficiency of providing the inputs. While the small sample size limits the generalizability of the results, the study acts as a proof of concept on the usability of VR for improving O&M practitioner input on the maintainability of building designs.
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This study investigates changing patterns in students use of electronic tools over a four year period, mapping changes in social communications with expectations in formal learning. The data, collected from 2001 to 2004, reflect the views of 2215 university entrants, the majority of whom were aged between 17 and 20 years across a range of disciplines (Business, Science and Engineering) on their first day at university. Although the data was collected prior to the emergence of the contemporary social technologies, it tests an underlying assertion that students expectations of learning are strongly influenced by their prior experiences. Results show no correlation between the extent of university entrants use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) and their expectations of how they will learn. Despite a dramatic increase in students use of ubiquitous technologies over a four-year period, their expectation of how they might learn at university remained relatively static over the same timeframe.
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The idea that a new generation of students is entering the education system has excited recent attention among educators and education commentators. Termed 'digital natives' or the 'Net generation', these young people are said to have been immersed in technology all their lives, imbuing them with sophisticated technical skills and learning preferences for which traditional education is unprepared. Grand claims are being made about the nature of this genera-tional change and about the urgent necessity for educational reform in response. A sense of impending crisis pervades this debate. However, the actual situation is far from clear. In this paper, the authors draw on the fields of education and sociology to analyse the digital natives debate. The paper presents and questions the main claims made about digital natives and analyses the nature of the debate itself. We argue that rather than being empirically and theoretically informed, the debate can be likened to an academic form of a 'moral panic'. We propose that a more measured and disinterested approach is now required to investigate 'digital natives' and their implications for education.
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The digital revolution accompaning the new generation is discussed. This revolution is powered by a fundamental preference for interactive media rather than broadcast media. A case study of a class is elaborated which is given the task of preparing a project on salt water fishes. The class make extensive use of Internet to prepare the project and share the project with other students with the help of Internet. The role of the teacher is limited to providing guidelines and the learning process is done by students themselves.
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Part 2 of Prensky’s paper exploring the differences between “digital natives” and “digital immigrants”. In this second part the author presents evidence to support these differences from neurology, social psychology and from studies done on children using games for learning.
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Part one of this paper highlights how students today think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors, as a result of being surrounded by new technology. The author compares these “digital natives” with the older generation who are learning and adopting new technology naming them “digital immigrants”.
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Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop and promote a realistic understanding of young people and digital technology with a view to supporting information professionals in playing useful and meaningful roles in supporting current generations of young people. In particular the paper aims to offer a critical perspective on popular and political understandings of young people and digital technologies – characterised by notions of “digital natives”, the “net generation” and other commonsense portrayals of expert young technology users. The paper seeks to consider the accuracy of such descriptions in reflecting young people's actual uses of digital technology and digital information. Design/methodology/approach – The paper provides a comprehensive review of the recent published literatures on young people and digital technology in information sciences, education studies and media/communication studies. Findings – The findings show that young people's engagements with digital technologies are varied and often unspectacular – in stark contrast to popular portrayals of the digital native. As such, the paper highlights a misplaced technological and biological determinism that underpins current portrayals of children, young people and digital technology. Originality/value – The paper challenges the popular assumption that current generations of children and young people are innate, talented users of digital technologies. Having presented a more realistic basis for approaching generational differences in technology use, the paper explores the functions and roles that information professionals can be expected to play in supporting young people in the digital age.
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People who have grown up with digital media are often assumed to be universally savvy with information and communication technologies. Such assumptions are rarely grounded in empirical evidence, however. This article draws on unique data with information about a diverse group of young adults’ Internet uses and skills to suggest that even when controlling for Internet access and experiences, people differ in their online abilities and activities. Additionally, findings suggest that Internet know-how is not randomly distributed among the population, rather, higher levels of parental education, being a male, and being white or Asian American are associated with higher levels of Web-use skill. These user characteristics are also related to the extent to which young adults engage in diverse types of online activities. Moreover, skill itself is positively associated with types of uses. Overall, these findings suggest that even when controlling for basic Internet access, among a group of young adults, socioeconomic status is an important predictor of how people are incorporating the Web into their everyday lives with those from more privileged backgrounds using it in more informed ways for a larger number of activities.
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In this study we compare university teachers’ and first-year students’ conceptions of teaching and learning at the Faculty of Environmental and Biological Sciences. The conceptions were analysed using data from open-ended questionnaires. The results showed that at the beginning of studies the gap between teachers’ and students’ conceptions of teaching and learning is substantial. This finding has important implications for the educational process. In order to enhance successful studying from the beginning of students’ university careers, it is important for teachers to become aware of the differences between students’ and teachers’ conceptions of learning. KeywordsHigher education-Conception of learning-Conception of teaching-Biology-Science-Education
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The authors critique the commonly accepted notions of ‘digital native’ students and the widening generation gap between them and ‘technophobic’ faculty. Their case studies, from UK higher education, demonstrate that attempts to introduce new models of learning are inhibited by 1) prevailing structure and culture within universities and 2) expectations (or even a stated preference) for traditional delivery and assessment of knowledge by the students themselves. The authors recommend a strategy for more systemic integration of social technologies and new learning styles into the curriculum to help ensure that universities remain relevant and add value to learners and employers in the digital age. Faculty yes
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This paper reports on a study conducted in 2006 with more than 2,000 incoming first-year Australian university students. Students were asked about their access to, use of and preferences for an array of established and emerging technologies and technology based tools. The results show that many first year students are highly tech-savvy. However, when one moves beyond entrenched technologies and tools (e.g. computers, mobile phones, email), the patterns of access and use of a range of other technologies show considerable variation. The findings are discussed in light of Prensky's (2001a) notions of the 'Digital Natives' and the implications for using technology to support teaching and learning in higher education. Yes Yes
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