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Multicasting in the hypercube, chord and binomial graphs

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Abstract

We discuss multicasting for the n-cube network and its close variants, the Chord and the Binomial Graph (BNG) Network. We present simple transformations and proofs that establish that the sp-multicast (shortest path) and Steiner tree problems for the n-cube, Chord and the BNG network are NP-Complete.

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Optimal Routing in Binomial Graph Networks
  • T Angkun
  • G Bosilca
  • B Vander Zanden
  • J Dongarra
Angkun, T., Bosilca, G., Vander Zanden, B., and Dongarra, J., "Optimal Routing in Binomial Graph Networks," Proceedings of the Eight International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Computing, Applications and Technologies (PDCAT'07), 363 -369, 2007.
Optimal routing in binomial graph networks
  • Angkun