Article

The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and student engagement

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

... Thus, the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a triennial large-scale international educational survey, conducted by the indicated that social media use might be regarded as a "double-edged sword" (Andersson, Hatakka, Gronlund, & Wiklund, 2014, p. 45). However, notably, communicative activities conducted on Facebook (e.g., commenting and creating events) were positively related to students' academic engagement (Junco, 2012), suggesting that the effects of social media use were mixed. ...
... In contrast, playing online games via SNSs was found to have negative effects on digital reading performance, which resonates with the findings of Junco (2012) showing that playing games on Facebook leads to college students' poor academic engagement but contradicts the findings of Biagi and Loi (2013) showing that gaming was positively correlated with adolescents' digital reading performance. This contradiction might be due to the differences between the variables used in these studies; since the latter work treated gaming as a combined construct of individual and collaborative gaming, it remained to be seen whether the effects were still negative when only online games involving social interaction were accounted for. ...
... Generally, the frequent use of SNSs for recreational purposes was found to hinder students' digital reading performance, and such negative effects tended to increase over time. SNSs have been widely identified as academic distractions by researchers within the latest decade (Feng et al., 2019;Junco, 2012;Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010) because of their requirement for excessive multitasking, occupation of learning time, and poor effects on the development of students' metacognition and online navigation skills, which might explain their negative effects on digital reading revealed by this study. ...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing importance of digital reading and the prevalence of social media among adolescents necessitate further investigations into the effects of social media on the development of students' digital reading proficiency, which could foster proper behavior and attitudes regarding social media and help narrow achievement gaps in reading education. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of information and communication technology (ICT)-based social media factors, categorized into use and attitudinal factors, on adolescents' digital reading performance and to capture the trajectory of the impacts on generations of adolescents over nine years. Data from 767,511 15-year-old students from 57 countries/regions in total were extracted from the four cycles of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) database, i.e., PISA 2009, PISA 2012, PISA 2015 and PISA 2018. Hierarchical linear models were constructed to investigate significant student-, school- and country-level factors. The findings indicated that a) the effects of ICT-based social media use outside of school varied across different purposes and types of use and the influential patterns remained relatively unchanged; b) students’ use of ICT-based social media at school was negatively correlated with digital reading performance in general from PISA 2009 to PISA 2018; and c) students with positive attitudes towards ICT-based social media performed better on the digital reading assessment than those with negative attitudes.
... Social media facilitates social learning, improved self-confidence and communication between students and instructors, which are benefits associated with the active use of education (Nkomo & Nat, 2017). Junco (2012) examined the relationship between Facebook use and student engagement, defined as the time spent preparing for class (academic engagement) and time spent in co-curricular activities (co-curricular engagement). Findings suggest that students' involvement in Facebook can either positively or negatively engage with their education. ...
... Students use social media as a way to improve their interaction between lecturers and peers. More specifically, social media such as Twitter and Facebook positively impact students' engagement with peers and instructors (Ally, 2012;Junco, 2012;Tiernan, 2014;Williams & Whiting, 2016). Several studies looked at how students utilise social media to enhance their learning experience and engagement (Ally, 2012;Alshuaibi et al., 2018;Ellis, 2015;Fagioli et al., 2015;Junco, 2012;Tiernan, 2014;Williams & Whiting, 2016). ...
... More specifically, social media such as Twitter and Facebook positively impact students' engagement with peers and instructors (Ally, 2012;Junco, 2012;Tiernan, 2014;Williams & Whiting, 2016). Several studies looked at how students utilise social media to enhance their learning experience and engagement (Ally, 2012;Alshuaibi et al., 2018;Ellis, 2015;Fagioli et al., 2015;Junco, 2012;Tiernan, 2014;Williams & Whiting, 2016). Studies have also related engagement with social media and positive influence on academic outcomes (Alshuaibi et al., 2018;Fagioli et al., 2015;Junco, 2012). ...
Article
Restrictions on physical gathering due to COVID-19 has compelled higher education institutions to rapidly embrace digital technologies to support teaching and learning. While logistically, the use of digital technologies offers an obvious solution, attention must be given to these methods' pedagogical appropriateness, mainly how students engage and learn in the spaces supported by these technologies. In this context, we explored the degree to which digital technologies have contributed to teaching and learning practices over the past decade. The study employed a systematic review using a newly developed tripartite model for conducting and presenting literature review reports. The model approaches the literature review process systematically and employs three phases for the critical examination of literature: description, synthesis, and critique. The current review focused on student engagement across technologies that encompass social media, video, and collaborative learning technologies. Relevant articles were obtained from the Scopus and Web of Science databases. Three core themes were identified: there was no shared understanding of what constitutes student engagement with learning technologies, there was a lack of explanation concerning the contextual variation and modalities of student engagement across the digital technologies, and self-reporting was the primary method of measuring student engagement, rendering results as perceptual rather than behavioural. We argue that using multiple datasets and different methodological approaches can provide further insights into student engagement with digital technologies. This approach to measuring engagement can substantiate findings and most likely provide additional insights into students' engagement with digital technologies.
... Indeed, the way in which most of us interact has changed significantly in the last 7 years, with Ping, WhatsApp and social media platforms, such as Facebook (FB) and Twitter, all emerging. And, although FB isn't the only social network site (SNS); it's by far the most popular amongst students (Hargittai, 2008;Junco, 2012c;Special & Li-Barber, 2012;Wesseling, 2012a). ...
... Others centred on the difference between time spent on FB per day or week, and/or the number of applications and groups used (H.E. R.I., 2007;Heiberger, 2008;Junco, 2012d;Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010;Wohn & LaRose, 2014), or frequency of use of different activities (Junco, 2012c(Junco, , 2012d. A few studies also measured the influence of FB usage in class or during study (multitasking) (Junco, 2012a(Junco, , 2012bRosen, Carrier & Cheever, 2013). ...
... And almost every study compared FB usage with the amount of time and effort a student spent in educational activities (H.E. R.I., 2007;Heiberger, 2008;Junco, 2012cJunco, , 2012dKirschner & Karpinski, 2010). However, these studies were inconsistent in their findings. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Globally the higher education community continues to explore curriculum delivery models which connect theory to practice to support the transfer of learning from the classroom to operational practice. Police recruit education is no exception and utilises a myriad of curriculum design and delivery models. Since 1998 the New South Wales Police Force in Australia has worked in partnership with Charles Sturt University on a degree based recruit education program. Continuous improvement and evaluation of the program has resulted in the implementation of an innovative curriculum design and delivery approach which challenges the traditional university subject learning process. This paper discusses the innovative model which is built on (1) the concept of situated learning and (2) the constructive alignment approach to teaching and learning. The learning delivery design is supported by a unique distributed content technology environment. The model and the initial results of its evaluation are presented. The initial findings suggest an increase in the level of preparedness of the student recruit for operational practice. The approach offers a contribution to higher education course development in which a central tenant is establishing a seamless segue from student to professional.
... The common reason for using Facebook remains social interaction and communication, while the use for academic purposes is still emerging (Hew, 2011). University teachers and students can use Facebook in relevant educational ways that promote student engagement (Lampe et al., 2011;Junco, 2012). ...
... Additionally, according to Rinaldo, Tapp, and Laverie (2011), social media broadened access to information related to course material. With these factors, it is strongly believed that social media can contribute positively to students' performance and overall academic experience (Junco, 2012). ...
... This study found that social media contributes positively to students' learning achievement. Many of the students (M = 4.12; SD = 0.74) acknowledged that exchanging opinions, thoughts, and reflections about lessons concluded in the class paves ways for a new idea, which is in agreement with Junco (2012). ...
Article
Full-text available
Full terms and conditions of access and use, archived papers, submission instructions, a search tool, and much more can be found on the JISE website: http://jise.org ABSTRACT This study examined the use of a social media platform-WhatsApp-by computer science students for learning computing education in the context of a Nigerian education institution. Nowadays, a large community of students in higher education institutions has embraced the WhatsApp platform for social interactions which makes it a useful tool in education. In this study, students formed three closed groups, and each group had a specific computing topic they discussed. Their discussions were in the form of posting questions, providing answers to questions, or expressing knowledge on the group topic. A questionnaire was used to collect data from the participants regarding their experiences. We conducted a descriptive analysis of the students' learning outcomes. The results show that the use of social media contributes positively to students' learning achievement, and they are motivated to acquire more knowledge about different computing topics.
... The first perspective holds that social networking sites distract students from attaining deeper engagement with their academic study (Alt, 2015;Astatke et al., 2021;Cao et al., 2018;Junco, 2012;Karpinski et al., 2013). Two important theoretical mechanisms are proposed to explain this negative relationship: time displacement and multitasking. ...
... The multitasking explanation, on the other hand, suggests that attending to two or more tasks at the same time can result in cognitive overload, which reduces students' ability to correctly and completely execute the tasks at hand (Junco, 2012;Junco & Cotton, 2012;Karpinski et al., 2013;Lau, 2017). The multitasking argument implies that trying to accomplish academic tasks while staying on social networking sites reduces students' attention span and their cognitive ability to effectively engage in academic work, thereby adversely affecting their academic performance (Junco, 2012;Karpinski et al., 2013;Lau, 2017;Lepp et al., 2015). ...
... The multitasking explanation, on the other hand, suggests that attending to two or more tasks at the same time can result in cognitive overload, which reduces students' ability to correctly and completely execute the tasks at hand (Junco, 2012;Junco & Cotton, 2012;Karpinski et al., 2013;Lau, 2017). The multitasking argument implies that trying to accomplish academic tasks while staying on social networking sites reduces students' attention span and their cognitive ability to effectively engage in academic work, thereby adversely affecting their academic performance (Junco, 2012;Karpinski et al., 2013;Lau, 2017;Lepp et al., 2015). ...
Article
Full-text available
With the widespread adoption of social networking sites among college students, discerning the relationship between social networking sites use and college students’ academic performance has become a major research endeavor. However, much of the available research in this area rely on student self-reports and findings are notably inconsistent. Further, available studies typically cast the relationship between social networking sites use and college students’ academic performance in linear terms, ignoring the potential moderating role of the intensity of social networking sites use. In this study, we draw on contrasting arguments in the literature predicting positive and negative effects of social networking sites use on college students’ academic performance to propose an inverted U-shaped relationship. We collected data on social networking sites use by having college students install a tracking app on their smartphones for 1 week and data on academic performance from internal college records. Our findings indicate that social networking sites use indeed exhibits an inverted U-shaped relationship with college students’ academic performance. Specifically, we find that spending up to 88.87 min daily on social networking sites is positively associated with academic performance, but beyond that, social networking sites use is negatively associated with academic performance. We discuss the implications of our findings.
... Facebook's popularity is undeniable, and the deep daily engagement of its users has subsequently captured the attention of educators seeking to mimic this engagement level in digital learning experiences (Junco 2012;Evans 2010;Lampe et al. 2011;Todorovic et al. 2020). Bicen and Cavus (2011) found that at least 24% of the 86 undergraduate students surveyed who use Facebook use it 1-2 h per day. ...
... With capabilities such as uploading photos/videos and adding/following links to external resources or pages, educational usage of Facebook for resource and material sharing could consist of exchanging multimedia resources, video/audio files, and documents (Mazman and Usluel 2009). Also, there are several studies, which have been focused on student engagement (Junco 2012;Hong and Gardner 2019;Zarzour, Bendjaballah, and Harirche 2020), academic achievement (Feng et al. 2019;Kirschner and Karpinski 2010;Marker, Gnambs, and Appel 2018;Northey et al. 2018) on Facebook. Lastly, with over 2.85 billion monthly users, Facebook is currently the most popular social network in the world (Statista 2021), and it makes sense to consider using it in the classroom simply due to its popularity and familiarity. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to establish an accurate baseline for Facebook usage and to investigate its learning potential via biometric perspective. This was explored by asking college students to browse their own Facebook page and peruse the content while wearing a high-fidelity EEG headset to record brainwave activity they experienced. Their actions were then coded using the empirically based Interactive-Constructive-Active-Passive (ICAP) engagement model to identify elements that could potentially be leveraged for learning. Based on these results, Facebook does not seem to make an ideal learning platform, due to higher frustration levels during higher cognitive tasks compared to passively consuming personally relevant non-instructional content. However, it may have more positive impacts on learning as long as initial frustration level is transformed smoothly to engagement and motivation for some learning opportunities and activities.
... In this respect, students' challenges across the online learning experience have a paramount influence on their engagement level (Burch et al., 2015;Manwaring et al., 2017;Omar et al., 2012). An empirical investigation conducted by Junco (2011) declared that students' participation in online course activities and tasks is confined by various difficulties concerning technical issues and system level of usability. Chen and Jang (2010) report that lack of access to online learning platforms occurred because the low level of technical infrastructure and absence of institutional support to technical issues affect students' intention and motivation to be highly engaged in the online learning method. ...
... Many recent pieces of research demonstrate that system's high level of usability has a fundamental role in generating learning outcomes with elevated educational quality levels when positive behavior influences the learning process (Okai-Ugbaje et al., 2020; Pajarianto et al., 2020;Popov et al., 2020). As teacher behavior to use online teaching platforms is driven by the embedded learning system ease of use (Hoi, 2020), student's online learning engagement results as a consequence of instructor guidance of how students can apply their soft skills and knowledge using technology-based tools (Burch et al., 2015;Junco, 2011;Osman et al., 2014). Thus, system usability is significantly associated with student's willingness to be involved within remote learning activities, question and answer, and class discussion as affected by teacher behavior towards online learning mode (Ibrahim and Nat, 2019;Lie et al., 2020;Manwaring et al., 2017;Roorda et al., 2017). ...
Article
Purpose This research explores the effect of e-learning Moodle-based system usability on students' learning outcomes with the possible intervening role of teacher's behavior and online engagement. Design/methodology/approach In this research, the authors followed a quantitative methodology and a deductive research approach. Data were collected from 433 students at different study levels and academic specializations in higher education institutions (HEIs) in Oman. The data have been analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling via Smart-PLS. Findings The findings of this research show that e-learning system usability affects students' learning outcomes. Moreover, the relationship between these two variables is mediated by teacher behavior and students' online engagement. Originality/value This study is important as it adds to the understanding of the role of e-learning system usability in predicting student outcomes. From practical perspectives, especially during the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, this study also helps practitioners at private HEIs use e-learning systems more efficiently and effectively to improve students' engagement and learning outcomes.
... Generally,several studies conclude that social media has been successful in connecting students with the college events andextracurricular activities (Deandrea, Ellison, Larose, Steinfield, & Fiore, 2011;Junco, 2012;Rios-Aguilar, González Canché, Deil-Amen, & Davis III, 2012;Ruud, 2013;Ternes, 2013;Yingxia, 2010;Yu, Tian, Vogel, & Kwok, 2010).Furthermore, Lin and Farnham(2013) suggestthat social networking sites help students to acquire new skills in different types of activities, for example some students use Youtube for the purpose of learning some techniques in sports, moreover students report that social media is useful in developing their artistic abilities. ...
... T h e r e s u l t o f t h i s s t u d y i s c onsistent with the previous studies that reported the role of Facebook in connecting students with the college life (Akyıldız, Argan, 2012;Al-Sharqi et al., 2015;Junco, 2012;Madge et al., 2009;Ruud, 2013;Ternes, 2013). Patriotic events came at the top of the extracurricular activities, followed by cultural and social activities. ...
Article
Full-text available
Social media applications enable academic institutions to get connected with their students, by posting and sharing college events and activities in their official pages. 483 posted extra curricular activities items in the college's group on Facebook were analyzed from Fall 2011 till Summer 2015. The results found that the college's page focused on different extracurricular activities, mainly on those related to patriotic events in the United Arab Emirates. However, students did not get much involved with the online content in the group. The study indicates that more research is needed to deeply explore the impact of Arab Universities' use of social media on students' motives to get positively engaged with the college extracurricular activities.
... There is a negative relationship between social-networking site use (e.g., Facebook, MySpace, Twitter) and academic performance [e.g., Rosen,Carrier,& Cheever,13,14]. Likewise, Junco [15,16] found a strong, negative relationship between time spent on Facebook and actual cumulative GPA. ...
... Apart from student's cell phone use for learning purposes and leisure, it also offers them the opportunity to establish new relationships [15] and increased family relationships [18]. However, the behavioural addiction of student's use of cell phones remains a serious challenge [19]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The use of mobile phones has become increasingly popular in recent years and it is more prevalent among university students. The widespread usage of cell phones has attracted the attention of many students, thereby increasing their rate of cell phone dependency. This study aimed to describe cell phone behaviours among undergraduate regular students at the University of Cape Coast. A survey research design was adopted for the study. Through the use of the stratified sampling technique, a sample of 2,061 undergraduate regular students participated in the study. Questionnaire adapted from Choliz’s (2012) Test of Mobile-phone Dependence (TMD) was used. The internal consistency, estimated using McDonald’s omega coefficient, ranged from .84 to .95. Means and standard deviations were used in analyzing the data for the study. The findings of the study revealed that students were prevalent in the use of cell phones in sending text messages, followed by surfing of the internet, length of time spent on the cell phone, and use of cell phone as a source of entertainment. It was recommended among other things that students should consciously regulate their use of cell phones so that it does not jeopardize their academic work.
... Most of the students prefer to keep their mobile phones switched on, or they never turn them off as they are fond of checking missed calls and messages regularly (North et al., 2014;Olufadi, 2015). Consequently, the time spent on phones affects their learning, academic performance, and psychological health (Junco, 2012a;2012b;Junco & Cotten, 2012;Rayan et al., 2017). Moreover, heavy use of mobile phones results in financial difficulties like paying bills (Tak & Panwar, 2017). ...
... Therefore, some studies suggest introducing SMSs within the classroom to utilize their interactive potentials (Markett et al., 2006;Muirhead & Juwah, 2004;Prammanee, 2003). However, others advice switching off mobile phones during academic activities (Olufadi, 2015) to prevent any adverse effect on their learning and academic performance (Junco, 2012a(Junco, , 2012bJunco & Cotten, 2012). ...
Article
Mobile phones have emerged as ubiquitous devices beyond simple means of communication. Students studying at tertiary-level educational institutions are one of the major target groups for mobile companies. Notwithstanding, the educators and the marketers of mobile phones and services do not know much about their needs and mobile phone usage behavior. This study aims to determine the mobile phone needs and usage behavior of university students in Oman. The study delves upon longitudinal data collected over three different points of time in a decade and analyzes the changes in students' needs and mobile usage behavior. The findings suggest that students' preferences over time for mobile phones have changed not only for brands but also the way they patronize mobile phones and associated services. The study gives a vital lead to educators and the marketers of mobile phones and services. By understanding the mobile phone needs and usage behavior of students, educators can target their content and deliveries and marketers can target their features, apps, and services innovatively to this emerging segment.
... Using social media platforms as OCC (out-of-class communication) tools allows students and instructors through a virtual group to post and reply to messages related to learning content (Junco, 2012). These groups can be an effective learning environment for students who are less involved in an active learning classroom and connect teachers and students. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study tries to fill the knowledge theory gap on the impact of social media use in political discourse. This research examines social media's performance in political learning where it does not exist as part of classroom learning. Social media is differentiated between activities that do not involve political interaction directly and discussion with other users. This study develops a cross-sectional survey on undergraduate college students' representatives of the five biggest campuses in Bandung, Indonesia. A total of 977 students filled questionnaires. The results show political discussion through social media networks providing students' political learning. The more students discuss related politics through social media, the higher their level of political awareness becomes. Social media activities do not impact political learning, where these activities do not involve discussion with other users. This study shows that students obtain political learning through political discussion through their networks, not just through social media activities. Political learning through social media requires discussion related to politics. Besides, sex, age, and expenditure also affect students' political knowledge acquisition. The results have implications for conducting studies on specific platforms to confirm social media activities' impact according to each platform's characteristics.
... Social media consists of a variety of web-based tools including networking platforms such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, blogs, and wikis that are designed to engage students through knowledge sharing, interactions, and collaborations [2,34]. Multiple studies have indicated that using social media as an educational tool can increase student engagement [34][35][36][37][38]. There is no doubt that social media played an integral role in how students learned during COVID-19. ...
Article
The world has changed rapidly since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the education community has not been immune to these changes. With abrupt school closings and a rapid transition to online teaching and learning, the educational technologies have been stretched to their limits and pedagogic approaches blossomed. As the world strives to reestablish normalcy, it will be under the influence of the long-lasting impact of the pandemic. This manuscript provides recommendations for the online conversion of anatomical sciences curricula in health sciences programs. Strategic guidelines are emerging for building on these changes to enhance teaching and learning in the current pandemic era.
... However, hardly any study concentrates on adding a reflection on social topics to writing and on the acquisition of social competences. The few studies found show that the acquisition of social 4 / 15 competences contributes to students' engagement and socialization (Ainin et al., 2015;Junco, 2012). In consequence, this study will focus on that area in order to show that the implementation of the writing proposal through Facebook goes beyond the development of writing skills, by incorporating social competences in the study. ...
Article
Full-text available
This article offers a proposal for integrating the social network Facebook into an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom in tertiary education. The main objectives of this article are the following: 1. To offer a pedagogical proposal so that students can develop written skills and grammar at the same time that they acquire social competences using Facebook and 2. To know students' opinions about the use of Facebook and the main social competences that they have acquired while using this social network in the teaching-learning process. The methodology is mainly qualitative-descriptive although some quantitative data is offered with the results of a questionnaire students completed. The data were collected through students' posts in the Facebook discussions and a questionnaire. The findings reveal the main grammar mistakes observed in students in the Facebook discussions and how Facebook is an appropriate social network for the participation of students in cooperative discussions on social topics and for the acquisition of social competences such as cooperation or communication. The results of the questionnaire show that students have a positive opinion about practicing the written skill in Facebook and they are aware that, apart from learning English, they also acquire social competences.
... In addition to this, while Facebook increased students' social awareness and social sensitivity, irrelevant discussions and poor-quality shares affected the learning environment negatively. Facebook use in itself does not have negative effects on academic outcomes and it can be a useful and advantageous opportunity for teachers (Junco, 2012). ...
Article
Full-text available
In the last decade, social media gradually increased their popularity on daily routines since people have accustomed to the new information and communication technologies. In terms of university students, the popularity of the internet is obvious, with the fact that their intense mood for searching adventures usually end up in social media. This study examined social media, particularly Facebook's use in higher education as a Learning Management System (LMS). The method employed in this research is meta-synthesis pattern in which 205 articles from SCI-Expanded and SSCI indexes were reviewed. According to the inclusion-exclusion criteria, 175 articles were eliminated and only 30 articles were deeply reviewed under three main themes, which are "learning, interaction, transition and adaptation." Descriptive results did not reveal that any research study before the year of 2009 dealing with these three main themes. In addition to this, the remarkable number of studies (n=6) were conducted in 2015 and 2016. All the examined studies were conducted in 16 different countries and quantitative methods and small sample sizes were generally preferred in those research studies. Considering the findings of those examined studies, Facebook as social media tool can be one of the best LMS option for higher education. he popularity of the mobile devices and internet are incontrovertible development in the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) because they present a wide range of contextual solutions to the users by applications. Mobile devices or computers are common since they correctly optimize websites and applications which also refer to social media in general, designed to allow users to share content quickly, efficiently and real-time. These social media applications are now indispensable parts of our daily routines. In social media as a part of Web 2.0, people who were once internet browsers have become content builders as broadcasters due to the widespread use of mobile devices. T
... The gap hypothesis is supported by findings indicating that students reporting more cynicism towards school also reported that they would be more engaged in their schoolwork if they were able to use more digital media (Salmela-Aro et al., 2016a). Other studies, in turn, offer both positive and negative relations between out-of-school digital engagement and student engagement depending on the actual activities (Bebell & Kay, 2010;Junco, 2012a;2012b). With regard to academic achievement, the literature suggests that the use of social media is positively related to literacy grades and negatively to general academic achievement (Kirschner & Karpinskin, 2010;Liu, Kirschner & Karpinski, 2017). ...
... Information and communication technology (ICT) innovations have accelerated the expansion of collaboration geographic space and numbers of participants, mobilizing increased concerns across the world [4][5][6][7][8][9]. As one of the most important tools of ICT, social media (i.e., emails, instant-messaging software, social networks sites) provides a high-effective and convenient platform for students to access, create and edit the materials with their teachers and peers, which is conducive to collaborative learning and enhance their academic achievements [10][11][12]. ...
... On the basis of the SDT assumption, we predicted that basic needs satisfaction in distance study would mediate the relations of four types of educational usage of Facebook to student academic achievement. In terms of covariates, we controlled for student age for two reasons: (a) Facebook is often seen as a medium for young people (e.g., Junco, 2012;Michikyan et al., 2015) and (b) the average age of the distance university students at FernUniversität in Hagen is considerably higher than in traditional universities (FernUniversität in Hagen, 2019b). In addition, high school grade-as required as a university entrance qualification-was also controlled for. ...
Article
Full-text available
Facebook has been widely used among students, not only for socializing, but also for educational purposes. However, it is much less clear whether educational usage of Facebook would be beneficial for student academic achievement, especially in distance education. This paper examined whether different types of educational usage of Facebook would be differentially connected with academic achievement of distance university students. Unlike previous studies, we distinguished between the quantity and the quality of educational usage of Facebook: The former is con- cerned with time spent, while the latter includes three types of educational utilities offered by Facebook (communication, collaboration, and resource sharing). Taking a self-determination theory perspective, we also examined whether the connection between different types of educational usage of Facebook and academic achieve- ment would be mediated by basic needs satisfaction in distance study. A total of 274 distance university students participated in an online survey. A path analysis demonstrated that different types of educational usage of Facebook and academic achievement were not directly associated. However, a mediation analysis showed that competence need satisfaction (and no other needs) fully mediated some link- ages: time spent to achievement, communication to achievement, and resource shar- ing to achievement. Findings and implications of this paper are discussed.
... Internet (Junco, 2012). Lokus komunikasi menerusi media sosial adalah tidak terbatas. ...
Article
This study discusses the use of social media in organizational information management focused on WhatsApp application. This phenomenon is important given the current situation where the usage of social media as one of the formal and informal communication channels in the distribution of organizational information needs to be examined especially in terms of usage factors and its implications. Thus, the main purpose of this study is to develop an instrument to measure the usage of WhatsApp as well as to identify the implications of WhatsApp usage among organizational staff. This study utilized combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. The qualitative method of interviewing was conducted with professional management staff, administrative and support staff. As a result of the interview, instruments to measure WhatsApp usage were formed which contained the dimensions of WhatsApp Usage, Belief in Information, WhatsApp Usage Ethics and WhatsApp Usage Competencies. The questionnaire was then distributed to the staff of the organization. Analysis of the questionnaire showed that there is a positive and significant relationship between WhatsApp Usage and Belief in Information, the Impact of WhatsApp Usage, and WhatsApp Usage Competencies. This study contributes to the knowledge related to information management in organizational communication as well as strengthening the Technology-based Social Construction theory and Hyper personal theory. Keywords: Competency, Information Management, WhatsApp, Instrument Development, Hyper personal theory Abstrak: Kajian ini membincangkan tentang penggunaan media sosial dalam pengurusan maklumat organisasi khususnya aplikasi WhatsApp. Fenomena ini penting memandangkan situasi semasa yang banyak melibatkan penggunaan media sosial sebagai salah satu saluran komunikasi formal dan tidak formal dalam penyaluran maklumat organisasi yang perlu diteliti dari segi faktor penggunaan dan implikasi dari penggunaan berkenaan. Tujuan kajian ini dilakukan adalah untuk membentuk instrumen bagi mengukur penggunaan WhatsApp serta mengenalpasti implikasi penggunaan WhatsApp dalam kalangan kaki tangan organisasi. Kajian ini mengaplikasikan gabungan kaedah kualitatif dan kuantitatif. Kaedah kualitatif iaitu temu bual dilakukan dengan kakitangan pengurusan profesional dan kakitangan pentadbiran dan sokongan. Hasil dari temu bual berkenaan, instrumen bagi mengukur penggunaan WhatsApp dibentuk yang mengandungi dimensi Penggunaan WhatsApp, Kepercayaan terhadap Maklumat, Etika Penggunaan WhatsApp dan Kompetensi Penggunaan WhatsApp. Soal selidik berkenaan kemudiannya diedarkan kepada kakitangan organisasi. Analisis dari soal selidik menunjukkan terdapat hubungan antara Penggunaan WhatsApp dengan Kepercayaan Terhadap Maklumat, Kesan Penggunaan WhatsApp, dan Kompetensi Penggunaan WhatsApp. Kajian ini menyumbang kepada pengetahuan berkaitan dengan pengurusan maklumat dalam komunikasi organisasi serta pengukuhan teori Konstruksi Sosial berteraskan Teknologi dan teori Hyperpersonal. Kata kunci: Kompetensi, Pengurusan Maklumat, WhatsApp, Pembentukan Instrumen, Teori Hyperpesonal
... According to the research, uncontrolled use of social media decreases self-esteem (De Cock et al., 2014;Pelling & White, 2009), increases loneliness (Özgür, 2013;Sagioglou and Greitemeyer 2014) decreases life satisfaction (Chan, 2014;Valenzuela et al., 2009) and causes depression (Blachino et al., 2015;Khattak et al., 2017;Steers et al., 2014). In addition, some studies have shown that individuals who spend time on social media for a long time exhibit poor academic performance (Junco, 2012;Karpinski et al., 2013;Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010). ...
Article
Full-text available
Psychological flexibility is associated with psychological health and affected by various factors. The aim of the present study is to examine the role of coronavirus anxiety, humor and social media addiction on psychological flexibility during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey. Variables were measured with online self-report surveys and data were gathered from December 2020 to January 2021 in Turkey. The sample consisted of 376 people (295 female, M = 29.88, SD = 11.05). The relationships between the variables were tested with path analysis using structural equation modelling (SEM). According to results, the constructed model showed that COVID-19 anxiety significantly and directly increased social media addiction (β = .17, p < .01), decreased coping humor (β = -.11, p < .05) and decreased psychological flexibility indirectly through social media addictions (β = -.08, p < .01). Humor coping significantly and directly increased psychological flexibility (β = .25, p < .01), and social media addiction significantly and directly decreased psychological flexibility (β = -.31, p < .01). Findings indicated that psychological flexibility is influenced by coronavirus anxiety, social media addiction and humor coping. Supporting humor coping and reducing anxiety and problematic social media use would be helpful to enhance psychological flexibility of individuals during the pandemic.
... Similarly Paul, Baker, and Cochran (2012) reached on a finding that there is a negative association between the time spent on social media and academic performance. Junco (2012) considered only Facebook to study its impact on students' overall GPA and again a negative relation is established between the time spent on Facebook and the GPA. Though, Estus (2010) in an experimental research found that Facebook is a helpful learning tool that enhances the class room learning experience. ...
Article
Full-text available
Research is getting enormously important to compete with rival institutes for ranking, financial funding, students enrollment. However, there still exist numerous gaps in our understanding of creating a knowledge generating environment that will produce superior quality research. With the initiation of web 2.0 technology, a model of social networking sites has become increasingly famous. With ever increasing popularity, these social media have been used by researchers and academicians as well to enrich the learning outcome and academic performance. However, OSNS have been a debatable topic in academia with its impact on the academic performance of the students. In this study, the impact of OSNS is investigated on the research performance of students in Pakistan. The survey questionnaire technique is used to gather the data from a sample of 212 research students. And to testify the hypothesis, factor analysis and regression analysis technique are used. The results showed a contradiction in the perception and behavior of the research students. Perceived usefulness of OSNS, information quality and media sharing via OSNS have proved to have a positive impact on the researcher's performance whereas collaboration has a negative impact; perceived behavior and facilitation support have an insignificant impact on researcher's performance. It is suggested to the researcher and supervisor both to consider the implication of OSNS in research work for better research output.
... As great as the promise of Facebook is, [12] found out in a study majority of students in higher institution do not use Facebook for academic purpose. This is unfortunate because it has been established that 90% of undergraduate students spend an average of one hour and forty minutes a day on the Facebook site [13]. ...
... In fact, many students prefer to use social media where they can interact more with their classmates and teachers. Previous studies show that students and teachers spend significant time on social media interacting and participating in different activities (Junco, 2012;Garad et al., 2021). In addition to social network and online applications, the educational space at home facilitates gathering the family and community around. ...
Article
Full-text available
Dramatic change in learning environments during the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the significance of virtual learning and led to more interactive learning environments. Quick adoption of online and social interactive learning in many universities around the world raised challenges and emphasized the importance of investigating different learning environments. This paper investigates the accelerated transition in education from traditional learning environments through online learning environments to social innovative learning environments, and the latest trends of this change. The stages of transition were divided into three parts: before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic, which was the reason for this accelerated change. Features and characteristics of each stage of transition were analyzed and discussed, based on the following factors: edu-space and classrooms, the learning and teaching process, curricular choices, information and communication technology applications, students’ and educators’ perceptions, edu-approaches, and knowledge transformation. A systematic review approach was used to investigate learning environments based on the literature reviews of previous publications. Analysis of these features revealed the main characteristics and differences in each stage. New trends in online learning environments and social innovative learning environments were identified including cloud platforms, massive open online courses, digital learning management systems, open educational resources, open educational practices, m-learning, and social network applications. Finally, this study makes two recommendations: 1) the adoption of online learning environments and social innovative learning environment applications to continue the e-learning process during the pandemic, and 2) the enhanced usage of online learning environments and social innovative learning environment applications in the future by educational institutions and governments.
... Drawing from research in cognate areas such as sport and teacher education, we can infer that young people's high exposure to social networks may relate to addiction behaviors (Romero-Rodríguez, Rodríguez-Jiménez, Ramos Navas-Parejo, Marín-Marín, & Gómez-García, 2020) or feelings of pressure to share aspects of their private life (Geurin, 2017). However, even though social media overuse has often been related with poor course engagement (Junco, 2012), there are studies to portray that digital networking can URL: www.onlinesciencepublishing.com | August, 2022 enhance independent student work (Clements, 2015), and freedom to explore content or communicate with colleagues (Brewer, Begleiter, Anderson, & Isaacs, 2015). ...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that university students’ decision to use social networks for academic reasons is influenced by several factors. However, until today there is no validated instrument measuring the factors that influence undergraduates to migrate to online networks for educational purposes. The aim of this study was to propose and validate the Push–Pull–Mooring - Physical Education (PPM-PE) questionnaire and examine possible factors that contribute to students’ decisions for social network use. Participants were 302 Physical Education (PE) students from a Greek Faculty of PE and Sport Science. Data analysis with exploratory factor analysis identified a three-factor structure that measured undergraduates’ use of social networks for academic learning purposes. Multivariate analyses of covariance indicated that gender had a significant effect on students’ social networking patterns, while device access did not. Age and hours spent online significantly contributed to the above differences. Findings are discussed in relation to the PPM framework and the idiosyncrasies of online instruction within PE university contexts.
... Facebook also provides students with an opportunity to get to know their instructors or classmates better (Çoklar, 2012). Thus, it has a positive impact on the student's course motivation, affective learning, and the feeling of being a part of that group (Mazer, Murphy, & Simonds, 2007;Junco, 2012). Furthermore, Facebook provides a social environment, enabling the student to interact with instructors and peers and facilitates the process of knowledge construction (Çoklar, 2012). ...
Article
The study attempts to determine whether or not Facebook is an environment suiting the Community of Inquiry Framework by investigating the cognitive, social, and teaching presence perceptions of students in Facebook groups and to examine the impact of group size on the CoI model. Additionally, whether or not these three types of presences predicted academic success and motivation were investigated. The data were analyzed through logistic regression analysis, independent samples t-test and the Pearson correlation coefficient. The study was conducted in a blended course, where Facebook was utilized for online discussions. The study revealed that the relation between cognitive, social, and teaching presences was significant and at a high-level. The high correlation determined among the social, cognitive, and teaching presence perceptions of students in learning communities created on Facebook leads to the consideration that Facebook is a suitable online environment for the COI framework. It is understandable, that all presence perceptions are higher in smaller groups when group impacts are investigated. Other conclusions derived from the study are that academic success was only predicted by cognitive presence and motivation was predicted by both cognitive and teaching presences. Key words: academic success, cognitive presence, Facebook, motivation, social presence, teaching presence.
... knowledge-oriented) are related to higher academic engagement . Conversely, communicative activities have been found to be positively related to student engagement, whereas with non-communicative activities the relation seems negative (Junco, 2012b), indicating a misfit between the formal and informal contexts. ...
Article
Since the turn of the millennium, the digital revolution has opened a new layer of opportunities for adolescents to participate, create and learn. Simultaneously there has been growth in both debate and worries regarding how the intensive engagement with digital media affects students’ academic performance, engagement, and school-related well-being, that is, academic functioning. Students’ continuously evolving digital practices are not always in congruence with the more traditional ways of schoolwork. Students flourish and fulfill their potential when the informal and formal practices of learning reach congruence, but when this is not the case, frictions can emerge. Spending time with digital media can provide new avenues for learning and development, but it can equally well divert young people from their studies or increase the daily demands. In this narrative review, we address these continuities and discontinuities between engagement with digital media and academic functioning for school-aged children and young people, focusing on meta-analyses, reviews, and key studies. Following the examination of the current literature, we conclude that, in general, the field of “digital media effects” needs to move beyond screen time and utilize the research on the students’ multidimensional socio-digital engagement already conducted. Second, we conclude that the average effects of digital engagement on academic functioning are negligibly small but heterogeneous, further corroborating the claim to examine the qualitative differences in students’ digital engagement, the individual differences between students, as well as the contextual interplay.
... age, employment, or background of study) influencing the findings (Calder et al., 1981;Samad et al., 2019). the inclusion of university students further strengthens the importance of the study as young adults demographically constitute the most engaged user segment for SNSs of all age categories (Eid & Al-Jabri, 2016;Junco, 2012;Shohrowardhy & Hassan, 2014). Before directing to the survey, the sample size should be considered. ...
Chapter
Worldwide Climate change is a challenging issue for every sector from business to agriculture or society. Tourism is not exempt from the adversity of Climate Change impact in a disaster-prone country like Bangladesh. Tourism could be regarded as a worst victim to Climate Change and it contributes to global Climate Change as well. However, the chapter outlays the Climate Change impact on tourism in Bangladesh and potential tackling strategies for sustainable tourism development of the country. A thorough systematic review has been done based on peer reviewed journals, reports of tourism policy makers or civil society dialogues to outline potential adaptation strategies that could be implanted by the tourism industries or stakeholders of Bangladesh to make it more sustainable. Though tourism industry of Bangladesh is still lagging behind than the neighboring countries, it is high time to adopt the strategies generated from both primary and secondary sources of data. To observe Climate Change impact thermal images had been analyzed of top tourist destination of Bangladesh and temperature data had been investigated for analysis based on the climatic data collected from the Bangladesh Meteorological Department. Other resources also show same evidence that climate change is bringing about temperature rise, beach erosion, uneven precipitation rate and salinity intrusion in the country. Finally, after identifying probable impacts on tourism because of Climate Change, adaptation measures have been suggested widely. Thus, there is always scope for further research to develop tourism sector is a sustainable manner and combat with the Climate Change adversity.
... Educators do not only teach students subject content but also prepare students how to be responsible citizens of the nation in future, hence apart from improving academic performance Facebook can be a tool to develop cognitive, psychosocial, morals and ethics among students (Junco, 2012). In addition, learners spend much time in an informal learning environment interacting with peers and receiving content more than they do with teachers in traditional classrooms (Phillips et.al, 2011). ...
Article
Full-text available
The use of Facebook in Namibia is focused on maintaining contact with friends and relatives, conduct sales on Marketplace, and to get updates on daily news (Peters, Winchiers-Theophilus & Mennecke, 2015). The purpose of the study was to explore whether Facebook has the potential to support learning and mastery of Physical Science content to improve learners’ academic performance on the topic of stoichiometry at Grade 12 level in selected schools in the Oshikoto Region. Study hypothesis is: H0 – There is no significant difference in the learners’ academic performance in NSSCO Physical Science on the topic of stoichiometry when Facebook is used as a learning support tool. H1 – There is a significant difference in the learners’ academic performance in NSSCO Physical Science on the topic of stoichiometry when Facebook is used as a learning support tool. The study used a quantitative approach with a quasi-experimental design, constituted of a Non- Equivalent-Groups Pre-test, Intervention and Post-test. The results show there exists a significant difference between the control and experimental score marks when Facebook was used as a learning support tools. The relevance of this study shows that teachers should learn to embrace using Facebook to support learning.
... Several studies (e.g., Junco, 2012a;Junco, 2012b) have examined the link between university student Facebook use and academic performance represented by Grade Point Averages (GPAs). Some research (Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010) has shown a negative relation between Facebook use and academic performance. ...
... Several studies have explored the impact of Facebook on education, considering several aspects, such as utilizing it in teaching and learning, stakeholders' attitudes and perspectives, including teachers, students, and administrators, toward utilizing it for educational purposes and as an educational resource (Kabilan et al., 2010;Aydin, 2012) and the relationship between Facebook utilization and students' motivation and engagement (Hyland, 2004;Junco, 2012). Furthermore, Facebook features facilitate communication without violating users' privacy, as these groups do not necessitate their members to be mutual friends. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of critical thinking for improving the writing skill of undergraduate Arab students who study English Literature at Saudi universities under lockdown circumstances due to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, it explores the impact of implementing Facebook as an online Constructivist tool to improve this skill. A general overview of the status of English language education in Saudi Arabia is briefly presented to shed light on the ongoing English language challenges in learning writing for undergraduate students in the English language and literature departments, which got more manifested due to the current status of education mode with the emergence of the pandemic. Two-group posttest-only randomized experiment was employed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed model, using the infusion and constructivism approaches. A total of 40 students enrolled in a literature course at a private university in Saudi Arabia participated in the experiment. The treatment was conducted through utilizing Facebook. The results demonstrated that students’ improvement in English writing was due to the combination of the infusion of a set of critical skills and the constructivist teaching and learning mode.
... Environmental factors, such as the quality of interactions with the students, instructors, and other forms of staff, as well as an overall sense of a supportive atmosphere, all contribute to student engagement (Baird, 2005). While many researchers have looked at the influence of pervasive digitalization on students' education levels and academic development, little is known about how these alternative learning experiences and practices affect the overall student engagement, because most of the original research on student engagement focused on students in the traditional face-to-face settings (Junco, 2012;Dumford and Miller, 2018). In relation to the larger management environment, the study mentioned above provides some insights into the information that is hidden in higher education. ...
Article
Full-text available
With the post-pandemic situation, digitalization has revolutionized physical teaching into online teaching and has become a common practice. The engagement of students has been essential for their good academic performance which can be ensured by the active participation of the students and this is a real challenge for the teachers. However, sometimes in online and physical teaching, teachers are also involved in rationalized knowledge hiding, which leads to the disengagement of the students, and this ultimately affects their academic performance. Therefore, the present study aims at measuring the students’ disengagement in the teaching classes, both physical and online. The population of the present study is the students from the universities of China belonging to different fields of study. The sample size for this study is 246. The data are obtained through the Questionnaire surveys. The existing study has assessed the role of teachers’ rationalized knowledge hiding behaviors in the disengagement of students and their lesser grades. It has been found that rationalized knowledge hiding in online teaching does not affect students’ performance; however, it makes students disengage from their studies in physical classes. Interestingly, the rationalized knowledge hiding in physical teaching has negatively affected the performance of the students. Furthermore, the mediating role of the students’ disengagement has been found significant in this study. Organizations, especially universities, can ensure maximum knowledge sharing by motivating the instructors through positive reinforcements. This study will be useful for the curriculum coordinators of different departments in ensuring the maximum outcome of the teaching classes, workshops, and seminars conducted either physically or online to avoid the rationalized knowledge hiding of the teachers.
Article
Full-text available
This study evaluates the long-term impact of a randomized controlled study which utilized Twitter as an educational intervention to extend the course beyond the physical and time constraints of face-to-face instruction. Participants included 125 undergraduates from a mid-sized midwestern doctoral granting university in the United States. Outcomes previously published include increased engagement and grades for the intervention group (Twitter) compared to the control group. In the longitudinal study presented here, interaction effects were analyzed between GPA, ACT, gender, and socio-economic status with first-to second year retention rates, 6-year graduation rates and 6-year graduation rates in STEM fields. A statistically significant interaction effect was found between socio-economic status and the intervention (Twitter), resulting in an increased likelihood of graduating in STEM compared to students with low-socioeconomic status (SES) in the control group. This finding indicates that low cost or free technology has the potential to expand the face-to-face classroom in meaningful ways, can increase access to faculty, can increase access to peer-support and ultimately enhance 6-year STEM graduation among low SES students.
Chapter
The present study, using a sample of university organizations from different world regions, aims to provide an overview of social media marketing strategies used in different geographical locations. For this purpose, the authors conducted a descriptive study of the communication patterns implemented by university institutions in four regions: Africa and the Middle East, North America, Latin America, and Europe. The study, which adopts a comparative format, contrasts the findings obtained in each of the aforementioned regions, highlighting the existence of both similarities and differences in the social media marketing strategies of the organizations observed. In line with previous research, the authors took Twitter as the social media platform to be monitored.
Article
Full-text available
The persistent low quality of graduates from universities in Nigeria has made them unemployable. Several efforts put in place only yielded little results. Hence, this study examined the impact of the use of social media in the academic advising system on science education students' academic performance. The research which adopted ex post facto design used all the one hundred and seventy-two first-year science education students of Olabisi Onabanjo University, Nigeria, for the 2017/2018 session as participants. It also used researchers-designed and validated sheet called Students' Result Collection Sheet (SRGS) to collect data. The data collected were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results revealed that the use of social media in academic advising significantly impacted the performance of science education student. Results also indicated that gender difference in the use of social media in academic advising has no significant impact on their academic performance. The study recommended the incorporation of social media into academic advising systems in Nigerian universities to improve students' academic performance.
Chapter
Popularity of social media is increasing day by day and there are thousands of social media platforms on the internet with different features. This chapter discusses the term social media in general and examines its evolution in detail from the beginning of the first e-mail to today. Authors explore the terms pertaining to the domain of Social Network Sites (SNS) which are considered as one of the most used forms of social media. Authors present a discussion about a popular topic “SNS addiction” and examine its characteristics with a brief literature review. Accordingly, despite the fact that excessive use of social network sites cannot be formally accepted as a behavioral addiction; shy and young, extroverted, and neurotic women with no relationship are more likely to develop addictive behaviors towards social media.
Article
In recent years, how students’ engagement can be developed in flipped classroom (FC) model has become a critical issue addressed in an educational context. Evidence suggests that students’ behavioral, cognitive, and emotional engagement may decrease in FC in time. It is thought that social networking sites (SNS) can contribute to this problem in FC. Since it is believed that students will show greater interest in discussions and knowledge exchange about the course, supporting courses with SNS is significant in terms of providing students with a social learning environment, it is assumed that students’ role of sociability, sense of community, and course satisfaction will increase, thereby promoting students’ engagement in those courses supported by SNS. This assumption appears in the literature as a gap that needs to be explored. In this sense, the purpose of this current research is to examine perceived sociability, sense of community, and student satisfaction and to determine how these variables predict behavioral, cognitive, and emotional engagement of students in FC supported by a virtual learning community. A total of 219 university students at a state university in Turkey. The research was carried out in the Computing I course conducted according to the FC model, and it was supported by the virtual learning community created on Facebook. Knowledge sharing and discussions about the course were made in Facebook groups. The data draws on students’ responses via three self-report instruments: satisfaction scale, students’ engagement scale, perceived sociability scale, and sense of community scale. Stepwise multiple linear regression was conducted for the data analysis. The findings indicate that students’ engagement in FC applications supported by the Facebook-based virtual learning community is high. Regarding sub-dimensions, students’ behavioral and emotional engagement scores are high, while cognitive engagement is moderate. Additionally, perceived sociability, sense of community, and satisfaction are significant predictors of students’ engagement. Several implications and future research recommendations are discussed.
Chapter
The purpose of this paper is to aim to identify the antecedents of attitudes and intention towards ecotourism while using social networking sites (SNSs). In the tourism industry, the importance of social networking is proliferating. However, very few studies have researched the predictors of attitude towards ecotourism in context of SNSs. This study was conducted by extending the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and applying it to a broad sample of university students of Bangladesh. Data were primarily collected from a survey of university students from public universities in Chattogram, the business capital of Bangladesh. Students were preliminarily selected, focusing on different profiles such as male/female, age, education level, user experience of SNSs, knowledge about ecotourism and commonly used SNSs types. SPSS and SmartPLS 2.0 software were used to analyze and test hypotheses. After applying bootstrapping technique, the authors observed that perceived trustworthiness have a robust positive effect on attitude towards ecotourism, followed by perceived ease of use and social influence. This study serves as a contribution towards the better understanding of the factors that may influence attitudes towards ecotourism. It can contribute to future research related to ecotourism.
Thesis
Full-text available
Nowadays, Internet, specifically Social Network Sites (SNS) has a great influence on the education system and academic life in universities. The main purpose of this study was to find out and discover instructors’ and students' attitudes towards the use of both SNS and Academic Social Network (ASN) sites in their academic life at the University of Sulaimani. In addition, the UoS_ASN site was proposed and developed as an ASN site. The development of the UoS_ASN site was formulated by the design-based research approach. Later, it was tested and used by students and instructors in the same university then students’ and instructors' attitudes and opinions were examined. The core purpose of the UoS_ASN site was to assemble instructors and students online which gave the opportunity to them to communicate and collaborate with each other, disseminate tutorials, research, and academic papers as well as help them to express their ideas and opinions. In this research, both qualitative and quantitative research methods were administered. The semi-structured interview was used to collect qualitative data with the instructors and questionnaire tools were used to collect quantitative data with the students. The participants in this research consisted of 105 students and 11 instructors. The result of the research demonstrated that instructors and students mostly have a positive attitude toward the use of SNSs and UoS_ASN. Keywords: Social Network Sites, Academic Social Network, ICT, E-learning
Article
Objective: The present study examined the association between passive FB use and academic stress, as well as the moderating role of users' dispositional levels of authenticity. Participants and Methods: A total of 188 college students responded to questionnaires regarding their FB use, trait authenticity, and academic stress. Results: The amount of time users reported they routinely engaged in passive FB use significantly correlated with academic stress. Further, users' levels of trait authenticity moderated this relationship. Time spent passively using FB was positively associated with academic stress only when user authenticity was high. However, how often students passively use FB was not significantly associated with academic stress regardless of their authenticity levels. Conclusions: These findings suggest that using FB passively for longer time periods might be a way to avoid academic tasks, which in turn might be associated with greater academic stress for those students who report higher levels of authenticity.
Article
Full-text available
The developments and changes that have accompanied the Covid 19 pandemic have affected the educational world and all sectors. Educational institutions around the world have implemented emergency and online educational practises to ensure continuity of education as opposed to the planned distance education activities that were implemented for continuity of education. Due to the Covid 19 pandemic, face-to-face classes have been held in universities across the world for about a year in many disciplines through various platforms. In this process, determining the effectiveness of distance education practises in universities for students is critical for programmes to achieve their goals. This study aims to highlight the variables and effects that influence university students' decisions regarding the efficiency of online instruction. To this end, 821 university students were surveyed. Their willingness and attachment to online education, socioeconomic level, and gender were tested using logit regression analysis to build a model that predicts university students' decision about the efficiency of online education. Age, gender, high school graduation, willingness to Online Education, and attachment to Online Education are among the variables in the logit regression model that significantly predict university students' decision about whether they consider online education to be efficient or not. When analysing the result of classifying students whether they consider online education efficient or not using the logit regression model, 291 of the 409 students in the group who consider education efficient were classified correctly and 118 of them were classified inaccurately, with the rate of correct classification being 71.1%.
Article
Full-text available
The paper’s main aim is to investigate and predict major factors in students’ behav- ioral intentions toward academic use of Facebook/Meta as a virtual classroom, tak- ing into account its adoption level, purpose, and education usage. In contrast to ear- lier social network research, this one utilized a novel technique that comprised a two-phase analysis and an upcoming the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) analy- sis approach known as deep learning was engaged to sort out relatively significant predictors acquired from Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). This study has con- firmed that perceived task-technology fit is the most affirmative and meaningful effect on Facebook/Meta usage in higher education. Moreover, facilitating condi- tions, collaboration, subjective norms, and perceived ease of use has strong influ- ence on Facebook usage in higher education. The study’s findings can be utilized to improve the usage of social media tools for teaching and learning, such as Facebook/ Meta. There is a discussion of both theoretical and practical implications.
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the study was to find out the association between uses of social networking sites with students' self-regulated learning and to examine the mediating role of students' academic engagement between the use of social networking sites (SNSs) and students' self-regulated learning. The population of the study was students from the public sector universities of Karachi. The data was collected by simple random sampling techniques. The sample size of the study was 386 undergraduate students of the two public sector universities located in Karachi. Adapted tool of social networking sites (SNSc), students' self-regulated learning, and students' academic engagement were used to collect the data. It was found that uses of social networking sites and students' self-regulated learning are positively associated with each other. It was also found that students' academic engagement and students' self-regulated learning are positively associated with each other. Furthermore, uses of social networking sites (SNSs) are associated positively with self-regulated learning of students when students' academic engagement played a mediating role.
Research
Full-text available
أثر استخدام الدعامات البنائية فى بيئة التعلم عبر شبكة التواصل الاجتماعي (facebook) على التحصيل المعرفى وكفاءة التعلم لدى طلاب تكنولوجيا التعليم بكلية التربية النوعية جامعة جنوب الوادى
Article
Combining the most popular social networking sites (SNS), Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Linkedin, and Pinterest, the number of social networking users has exceeded two billion ( Jain, 2013 ). The average American spends on average 37 min to 2 h and 16 min on SNS each day, which surpasses any other internet activity, including email ( Adler, 2014 ; Batastini & Vitacco, 2020 ; Kemp, 2019 ). The high number of users and the amount of time people spend social networking has given rise to an increased interest of research on social medical and mental health. For example, several studies have shown that extended social media use increases depression ( Coyne et al., 2020 ; Veretilo & Billick, 2012 ), symptoms of bipolar mania, narcissism, and histrionic personality disorder in adults 18–35 ( Rosen et al., 2013 ) and decreases self-esteem among adolescents ( Coyne et al., 2020 ; Shapiro & Margolin, 2014 ).
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Previous research on social media use (SMU) and mental health has focused on younger individuals. For example, in young adults active SMU (e.g. posting content) has been related to decreased depressive symptoms, whereas passive SMU (e.g. browsing content) has been related to increased depressive symptoms. These relationships have not yet been investigated in older adults, however, even though SMU and poor mental health are common. Methods: We collected data from adults aged 65 years and older, and categorized SMU into active and passive dimensions with a principal component analysis. Next, we conducted t-tests and logistic regressions to assess whether older adults' SMU was associated with depressive symptoms. Results: Our analysis revealed that active SMU was associated with increased odds for depressive symptoms, whereas passive SMU was associated with decreased odds for depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the relationships between active and passive SMU and depressive symptoms in older adults are different from previous literature focusing on younger individuals. We theorize that these findings may be due to older adults' engaging in fewer social comparisons overall, and hence experiencing fewer negative feelings while passively viewing others' social media posts.
Article
Full-text available
Background: Globally, social networking sites are substantially used for indulgence, content, and interaction. Despite this, the worst impact of prolonged use of social networking sites has been associated with physical, mental, and long-term well-being. Its impact on medical students is a significant concern for many medical schools and administrators as users differ in purpose, preferences, and perceived usefulness. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the association of social networking sites’ preferences and motives with medical students’ mental well-being and academic performance. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted on 167 medical students of King Faisal University for three months, from October 2020 to December 2020. Participant’s information related to demographics, usage of social networking sites, mental well-being, and academic grades were collected through online questionnaires with valid measures. Results: Data analyses were performed using SPSS version 21. Almost all medical students were browsing social networking sites daily (98.2%). The most frequently visited sites were WhatsApp (97.6%), followed by YouTube (86.8%), and Instagram (77.8%). It was revealed that 3rd-year students were significantly using Facebook, mainly for fun. Besides, significantly better mental well-being was reported among females’ incentives to use social networking sites to keep in touch with family, friends, and relatives. It was also found that females were significantly more of being Instagram users and Snapchat users than males and observed significantly more having excellent academic grades than males. Conclusions: Our study suggests that students were motivated to connect with social networking sites for their various preferences or needs influenced by their beliefs, attitude, and plans.
Article
Full-text available
Science centres are an important element of the cultural and educational landscape of the modern world. Their role is changing. Due to the diverse activities of these centres, they are of interest to academics and experts from many disciplines. Their classification stands at the border of education and culture, non-profit and for-profit and this makes them especially interesting. The goal of the paper is to present the role of science centres in the current COVID-19 pandemic. Keywords: science centres, New Customer, Post-Pandemic Education, hybrid education
Article
Objective: The objective of this study is to introduce short stories and motivational messages on soft skills in pharmacy didactic courses to improve classroom engagement. Methods: Surveys were then conducted on the impact of students’ understanding of soft skills and their impact on classroom engagement. Results: The survey results from the two classes (2022 and 2023) of first year students showed that they gained an understanding of soft skills appropriately. The strategy also improved their classroom engagement and well-being. A further survey from a class of 2023 third year students indicated the strategy continued to be helpful in subsequent years. The results from students’ feedback also showed that students generally appreciated the strategy, and it helped them stay positive and engaged in the classroom. Conclusion: Overall, the study concluded that this unique delivery of soft skill information helped students in classroom engagement and helped them learn various soft skill sets.
Chapter
As colleges and universities shifted the bulk of their classes online in response to COVID-19, there was also a concomitant shift in how students could be supported by institutions. Yet, very little is known about the support networks that students tap into when confronted with such change, and there is reason to believe that students' ability to access and benefit from online support structures—and the social connections they make—might be moderated by their digital skills and competencies. The purpose of this chapter is to better understand what support networks students preferred to access when classes moved online, and whether techno-capital, a measure of digital skills and knowledge, influenced these choices. This chapter summarizes research findings from multivariate regression models that used student data collected from a community college in the USA, just after the classes migrated online. The chapter concludes with recommendations based on this research.
Article
Full-text available
This study assesses whether Facebook users have different ‘connection strategies,’ a term which describes a suite of Facebook-related relational communication activities, and explores the relationship between these connection strategies and social capital. Survey data (N = 450) from a random sample of undergraduate students reveal that only social information-seeking behaviors contribute to perceptions of social capital; connection strategies that focus on strangers or close friends do not. We also find that reporting more ‘actual’ friends on the site is predictive of social capital, but only to a point. We believe the explanation for these findings may be that the identity information in Facebook serves as a social lubricant, encouraging individuals to convert latent to weak ties and enabling them to broadcast requests for support or information.
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the rapid adoption of online social network sites (also known as social networking sites) (SNSs) by students on a US college campus. Using quantitative (n = 713) and qualitative (n = 51) data based on a diverse sample of college students, demographic and other characteristics of SNS users and non-users are compared. Starting with the theoretical frameworks of Robin Dunbar and Erving Goffman, this paper situates SNS activity under two rubrics: (1) social grooming; and (2) presentation of the self. This study locates these sites within the emergence of social computing and makes a conceptual distinction between the expressive Internet, the Internet of social interactions, and the instrumental Internet, the Internet of airline tickets and weather forecasts. This paper compares and contrasts the user and non-user populations in terms of expressive and instrumental Internet use, social ties and attitudes toward social-grooming, privacy and efficiency. Two clusters are found to influence SNS adoption: attitudes towards social grooming and privacy concerns. It is especially found that non-users display an attitude towards social grooming (gossip, small-talk and generalized, non-functional people-curiosity) that ranges from incredulous to hostile. Contrary to expectations, non-users do not report a smaller number of close friends compared with users, but they do keep in touch with fewer people. Users of SNS are also heavier users of the expressive Internet, while there is no difference in use of instrumental Internet. Gender also emerges as an important predictor. These findings highlight the need to differentiate between the different modalities of Internet use.
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of the study was to gather descriptive information about college students’ Internet use and to explore the relationship between types of Internet use and well-being. The sample consisted of 312 college students (67% female; age range 18-49 years; M = 21.34 years, SD = 5.05). Self-report questionnaires were administered in a large undergraduate psychology course. Exploratory factor analyses suggested 5 specific types of use: Meeting People, Information Seeking, Distraction, Coping, and E-mail. Confirmatory factor analyses on a new sample from the same university (N = 169) verified the 5-factor structure. Using the Internet for coping purposes related to depression, social anxiety, and family cohesion more so than frequency of use. This study highlights the importance of examining types of Internet use in relation to well-being.
Article
Full-text available
Research examining the relationship between gender and student engagement at the post secondary level has provided mixed results. The current study explores two possible reasons for lack of clarity regarding this relationship: improper parameter estimation resulting from a lack of multi‐level analyses and inconsistent conceptions/measures of ‘student engagement’. Data from the 2006 administration of the National Survey for Student Engagement (NSSE) at a southeastern university were analysed. Results indicated that the relationship between gender and engagement is related to engagement type as well as an institution level factor (gender composition). Implications and directions for future research are discussed.
Article
Full-text available
This study examines if Facebook, one of the most popular social network sites among college students in the U.S., is related to attitudes and behaviors that enhance individuals' social capital. Using data from a random web survey of college students across Texas (n = 2,603), we find positive relationships between intensity of Facebook use and students' life satisfaction, social trust, civic engagement, and political participation. While these findings should ease the concerns of those who fear that Facebook has mostly negative effects on young adults, the positive and significant associations between Facebook variables and social capital were small, suggesting that online social networks are not the most effective solution for youth disengagement from civic duty and democracy.
Article
Full-text available
Are there two definable groups of users of social networking sites based on the individual’s interaction style, that is whether the prime goal is to self-promote (broadcast) or maintain relationships (communicate)? Do such groups indulge in differing patterns of deceptive behaviour? Measures of personality, behaviour, and Facebook activity were completed by 113 undergraduate students all of which were active Facebook users. Regression analyses showed that while broadcasting behaviour was predicted by risk taking, an out-going personality and an absence of quality interaction; low mild social deviance predicted communication behaviour. Unexpectedly, cluster analysis identified three, not two, distinct groups of users: high broadcasters, high communicators and a high interaction group. Although each group mainly interacted with known others, their style of the interaction varied. Communicators’ interaction style supported group cohesion often through the use of ‘white lies’ or social oil; while the remaining two groups indulged in deceptive behaviour designed to self-promote or aggrandize the individual.
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the relationship between use of Facebook, a popular online social network site, and the formation and maintenance of social capital. In addition to assessing bonding and bridging social capital, we explore a dimension of social capital that assesses one's ability to stay connected with members of a previously inhabited community, which we call maintained social capital. Regression analyses conducted on results from a survey of undergraduate students (N=286) suggest a strong association between use of Facebook and the three types of social capital, with the strongest relationship being to bridging social capital. In addition, Facebook usage was found to interact with measures of psychological well-being, suggesting that it might provide greater benefits for users experiencing low self-esteem and low life satisfaction.
Article
Full-text available
Because campus officials are relying on personal communication technologies to communicate with students, a question arises about access and usage. Although communication technologies are popular among college students, some evidence suggests that differences exist in ownership and use. We examined patterns of student ownership and use of cell phones and use of instant messaging, focusing on three predictors of digital inequality: gender, ethnicity, and income. Logistic and hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to analyze results from 4,491 students. The odds that female and white students owned cell phones were more than twice as high as for men and African-American students. Students in the $100,000-$149,000 per year income bracket were more than three times as likely to own a cell phone than those from the median bracket. However, being female, African-American, and/or from the highest income brackets was positively predictive of the number of text messages sent and the amount of time spent talking on a cell phone per week. We found no differences between students on the use of instant messaging. Implications of these results, as well as areas for further research, are provided.
Article
Research on dropping out of school has focused on characteristics of the individual or institution that correlate with the dropout decision. Many of these characteristics are nonmanipulable, and all are measured at one point in time, late in the youngster’s school career. This paper describes two models for understanding dropping out as a developmental process that may begin in the earliest grades. The frustration-self-esteem model has been used for years in the study of juvenile delinquency; it identifies school failure as the starting point in a cycle that may culminate in the student’s rejecting, or being rejected by, the school. The participation-identification model focuses on students’ “involvement in schooling,” with both behavioral and emotional components. According to this formulation, the likelihood that a youngster will successfully complete 12 years of schooling is maximized if he or she maintains multiple, expanding forms of participation in school-relevant activities. The failure of a youngster to participate in school and class activities, or to develop a sense of identification with school, may have significant deleterious consequences. The ability to manipulate modes of participation poses promising avenues for further research as well as for intervention efforts.
Article
Gender and Computers presents evidence that shows that girls and young women are being left behind on the road to information technology. This book not only documents the digital divide but also provides guideposts to overcoming it. Social psychological theories and data are brought to bear on understanding the societal and environmental roots of the divide. Remedies ranging from family dynamics to teacher-student interactions to the controversial question of the gender organization of schools and school systems are proposed. Gender and Computers: Understanding the Digital Divide: * considers the authors' original research as well as recently published work by other leading scholars; * documents that girls are at a marked disadvantage in their ability to learn about and profit from information technology in our educational system; * sets the problem of computer anxiety in a rich context of social psychological theories, including stereotype threat, self-fulfilling prophecy, social comparison and attribution theory; and * offers suggestions that parents, teachers, and school systems can implement to overcome the digital divide. The book is intended to appeal to students and researchers in the social and behavioral sciences, education, human factors, and computer science interested in gender differences in general, and in human-computer interaction, in particular. The authors' goal is to stimulate social scientists and educators to further research this topic to generate solutions to the problem. © 2003 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. All rights reserved.
Article
A student development theory based on student involvement is presented and described, and the implications for practice and research are discussed.
Article
This study examines the relationships between student engagement, college GPA, and persistence for 6,000 students attending 18 baccalaureate-granting institutions. Data sources included student-level information from the National Survey of Student Engagement, academic transcripts, merit aid, and ACT/SAT score reports. Engagement had positive, statistically significant effects on grades and persistence between the first and second year of study for students from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. Equally important, engagement had compensatory effects for historically underserved students in that they benefited more from participating in educationally purposeful activities in terms of earning higher grades and being more likely to persist.
Article
In a 1992 Calvin and Hobbs cartoon (Watterson), 6-year-old Calvin asks his teacher whether he is being adequately prepared for the challenges of the 21st century. He wants to know if he will have the skills and competencies that will allow him to succeed in a tough, global economy. In response, the teacher suggests he start working harder because what he will get out of school depends on how much effort he puts into it. Calvin ponders this advice for a moment and says, "Then forget it." The exchange between Calvin and his teacher gets right to the point about what matters to student learning and personal development. Indeed, one of the few unequivocal conclusions from How College Affects Students (Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005) is that the amount of time and energy students put forth-student engagement-is positively linked with the desired outcomes of undergraduate education. Unfortunately, Calvin's response is all too common, if not according to what students say, then by what they do or do not do. In this paper, I summarize the role and contributions of the scholarship and institutional research about student engagement and its relevance for student development professionals and others committed to enhancing the quality of the undergraduate experience. The presentation is organized into four major sections. First, I briefly describe the evolution of the student engagement concept and explain its importance to student development. Then, I summarize findings from research studies about the relationships between student engagement and selected activities including participation in high-impact practices, employment, and some other experiences of relevant a relevance to the current generation of undergraduates. Next, I discuss some topics that warrant additional investigation to better understand how to further potential and utility of student engagement research and institutional policies and practices that the findings suggest. I close with some observations about the implications of student engagement research for student affairs professionals and others on campus committed to improving the quality of undergraduate education. Student engagement represents the time and effort students devote to activities that are empirically linked to desired outcomes of college and what institutions do to induce students to participate in these activities (Kuh, 2001, 2003, 2009). The meaning and applications of this definition of student engagement have evolved over time to represent increasingly complex understandings of the relationships between desired outcomes of college and the amount of time and effort students invest in their studies and other educationally purposeful activities (Kuh, 2009; Wolf-Wendel, Ward, & Kinzie, 2009). For example, building on Tyler's "time on task" concept (Merwin, 1969), Pace (1980, 1984) developed the College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ) to measure "quality of effort" to identify the activities that contributed to various dimensions of student learning and personal development. His research across three decades (1960 to 1990) showed that students gained more from their studies and other aspects of the college experience when they devoted more time and energy to certain tasks that required more effort than others-studying, interacting with their peers and teachers about substantive matters, applying their learning to concrete situations and tasks in different contexts, and so forth (Pace, 1984, 1990). Astin (1984) further fleshed out and popularized the quality of effort concept with his "theory of involvement," which highlighted the psychological and behavioral dimensions of time on task and quality of effort. His landmark longitudinal studies about the impact of college on students empirically demonstrated the links between involvement and a range of attitudinal and developmental outcomes (Astin, 1977, 1993). Astin was a major contributor to the widely cited Involvement in Learning report (National Institute of Education, 1984) which underscored the importance of involvement to student achievement and such other valued outcomes as persistence and educational attainment (Astin, 1999). In that same decade, after an invitational conference of scholars and educators held at the Wingspread Conference Center in Wisconsin, Chickering and Gamson (1987) distilled the discussions about the features of high-quality teaching and learning settings into seven good practices in undergraduate education: (a) student-faculty contact, (b) active learning, (c) prompt feedback, (d) time on task, (e) high expectations, (f ) respect for diverse learning styles, and (g...
Article
Research on dropping out of school has focused on characteristics of the individual or institution that correlate with the dropout decision. Many of these characteristics are nonmanipulable, and all are measured at one point in time, late in the youngster’s school career. This paper describes two models for understanding dropping out as a developmental process that may begin in the earliest grades. The frustration-self-esteem model has been used for years in the study of juvenile delinquency; it identifies school failure as the starting point in a cycle that may culminate in the student’s rejecting, or being rejected by, the school. The participation-identification model focuses on students’ “involvement in schooling,” with both behavioral and emotional components. According to this formulation, the likelihood that a youngster will successfully complete 12 years of schooling is maximized if he or she maintains multiple, expanding forms of participation in school-relevant activities. The failure of a youngster to participate in school and class activities, or to develop a sense of identification with school, may have significant deleterious consequences. The ability to manipulate modes of participation poses promising avenues for further research as well as for intervention efforts.
Article
Despite the widespread use of social media by students and its increased use by instructors, very little empirical evidence is available concerning the impact of social media use on student learning and engagement. This paper describes our semester-long experimental study to determine if using Twitter – the microblogging and social networking platform most amenable to ongoing, public dialogue – for educationally relevant purposes can impact college student engagement and grades. A total of 125 students taking a first year seminar course for pre-health professional majors participated in this study (70 in the experimental group and 55 in the control group). With the experimental group, Twitter was used for various types of academic and co-curricular discussions. Engagement was quantified by using a 19-item scale based on the National Survey of Student Engagement. To assess differences in engagement and grades, we used mixed effects analysis of variance (ANOVA) models, with class sections nested within treatment groups. We also conducted content analyses of samples of Twitter exchanges. The ANOVA results showed that the experimental group had a significantly greater increase in engagement than the control group, as well as higher semester grade point averages. Analyses of Twitter communications showed that students and faculty were both highly engaged in the learning process in ways that transcended traditional classroom activities. This study provides experimental evidence that Twitter can be used as an educational tool to help engage students and to mobilize faculty into a more active and participatory role.
Article
This chapter explores Facebook.com's current and potential uses for increasing college student involvement. Ideas based on Astin's model of student involvement provide a framework for discussion.
Article
This chapter reviews technology use patterns and the social impacts of technology on well-being among college students. It provides empirical evidence delineating the processes through which Internet use affects well-being among college students, and provides suggestions for ways to advance future studies in this area and for higher education faculty and staff as they work with technologically savvy students.
Article
Widespread use of the Web and other Internet technologies in postsecondary education has exploded in the last 15 years. Using a set of items developed by the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), the researchers utilized the hierarchical linear model (HLM) and multiple regressions to investigate the impact of Web-based learning technology on student engagement and self-reported learning outcomes in face-to-face and online learning environments. The results show a general positive relationship between the use the learning technology and student engagement and learning outcomes. We also discuss the possible impact on minority and part-time students as they are more likely to enroll in online courses.
Article
Social Networking Sites (SNSs) such as Facebook are one of the latest examples of communications technologies that have been widely-adopted by students and, consequently, have the potential to become a valuable resource to support their educational communications and collaborations with faculty. However, faculty members have a track record of prohibiting classroom uses of technologies that are frequently used by students. To determine how likely higher education faculty are to use Facebook for either personal or educational purposes, higher education faculty (n = 62) and students (n = 120) at a mid-sized southern university were surveyed on their use of Facebook and email technologies. A comparison of faculty and student responses indicate that students are much more likely than faculty to use Facebook and are significantly more open to the possibility of using Facebook and similar technologies to support classroom work. Faculty members are more likely to use more “traditional” technologies such as email.
Article
Millions of contemporary young adults use social networking sites. However, little is known about how much, why, and how they use these sites. In this study, 92 undergraduates completed a diary-like measure each day for a week, reporting daily time use and responding to an activities checklist to assess their use of the popular social networking site, Facebook. At the end of the week, they also completed a follow-up survey. Results indicated that students use Facebook approximately 30 min throughout the day as part of their daily routine. Students communicated on Facebook using a one-to-many style, in which they were the creators disseminating content to their friends. Even so, they spent more time observing content on Facebook than actually posting content. Facebook was used most often for social interaction, primarily with friends with whom the students had a pre-established relationship offline. In addition to classic identity markers of emerging adulthood, such as religion, political ideology, and work, young adults also used media preferences to express their identity. Implications of social networking site use for the development of identity and peer relationships are discussed.
Article
Are there systematic differences between people who use social network sites and those who stay away, despite a familiarity with them? Based on data from a survey administered to a diverse group of young adults, this article looks at the predictors of SNS usage, with particular focus on Facebook, MySpace, Xanga, and Friendster. Findings suggest that use of such sites is not randomly distributed across a group of highly wired users. A person’s gender, race and ethnicity, and parental educational background are all associated with use, but in most cases only when the aggregate concept of social network sites is disaggregated by service. Additionally, people with more experience and autonomy of use are more likely to be users of such sites. Unequal participation based on user background suggests that differential adoption of such services may be contributing to digital inequality.
Article
College students use information and communication technologies at much higher levels and in different ways than prior generations. They are also more likely to multitask while using information and communication technologies. However, few studies have examined the impacts of multitasking on educational outcomes among students. This study fills a gap in this area by utilizing a large-sample web- based survey of college student technology usage to examine how instant messaging and multitasking affect perceived educational outcomes. Since multitasking can impede the learning process through a form of information overload, we explore possible predictors of academic impairment due to multi- tasking. Results of this study suggest that college students use instant messaging at high levels, they multitask while using instant messaging, and over half report that instant messaging has had a detri- mental effect on their schoolwork. Higher levels of instant messaging and specific types of multitasking activities are associated with students reporting not getting schoolwork done due to instant messaging. We discuss implications of these findings for researchers studying the social impacts of technology and those in higher education administration.
Article
Since 2004, the annual ECAR study of undergraduate students and information technology has sought to shed light on how information technology affects the college experience. We ask students about the technology they own and how they use it in and out of their academic world. We gather information about how skilled students believe they are with technologies; how they perceive technology is affecting their learning experience; and their preferences for IT in courses. The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2010 is a longitudinal extension of the annual 2004 through 2009 studies. It is based on quantitative data from a spring 2010 survey of 36,950 freshmen and seniors at 100 four-year institutions and students at 27 two-year institutions; student focus groups that included input from 84 students at 4 institutions; and review of qualitative data from written responses to open-ended questions. In addition to exploring student ownership, experience, behaviors, preferences, and s
Article
This experimental study examined the effects of teacher self-disclosure via Facebook on anticipated college student motivation, affective learning, and classroom climate. Participants who accessed the Facebook website of a teacher high in self-disclosure anticipated higher levels of motivation and affective learning and a more positive classroom climate. In their responses to open-ended items, participants emphasized possible negative associations between teacher use of Facebook and teacher credibility. Participants offered recommendations for teachers regarding the use of Facebook and other weblog services.
Article
An Internet survey of college freshmen at a mid-Atlantic mid-sized university was conducted during the spring of 2002 to determine the impact of Internet activities on social support and well-being. Results obtained from the survey allow examination of the impact of amount of time performing different types of Internet activities on depressive symptoms, as measured by the Iowa version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) via a semi-elasticity ordinary least squares regression model. Results indicate that increased e-mail and chat room/instant messaging (IM) hours are associated with decreased depressive symptoms, while increased Internet hours for shopping, playing games, or research is associated with increased depressive symptoms. The implications of these results for institutions of higher education, and Internet and health researchers are discussed.
Can social networking keep students in school?
  • L. Abramson
  • L. Abramson
College freshmen and online social networking sites
  • Higher Education Research Institute
  • Higher Education Research Institute
Gates Foundation bets on Facebook app to help kids graduate
  • A. Kamenetz
  • A. Kamenetz
The digital divide survey snapshot
  • Kaiser Family Foundation
  • Kaiser Family Foundation
Generations online in 2009
  • S. Jones
  • S. Fox
  • S. Jones
  • S. Fox
Facebook, blogs, tweets: how staff and units can use social networking to enhance student learning, Presentation at the annual meeting of the National Association for Student Personnel Administrators
  • M Matney
  • K Borland
Matney, M., & Borland, K. (2009). Facebook, blogs, tweets: how staff and units can use social networking to enhance student learning, Presentation at the annual meeting of the National Association for Student Personnel Administrators, Seattle, WA.
A shift to engagement
  • D. Morrin
  • D. Morrin
A shift to engagement. Facebook Developer's Blog
  • D Morrin
Morrin, D. (August 29, 2007). A shift to engagement. Facebook Developer's Blog, Retrieved April 17, 2011, from: https://developers.facebook.com/blog/post/30.
Have you Facebooked Astin lately? Using technology to increase student involvement Using emerging technologies to enhance student engagement. New Directions for Student Services College freshmen and online social networking sites
  • G Heiberger
  • R Harper
Heiberger, G., & Harper, R. (2008). Have you Facebooked Astin lately? Using technology to increase student involvement. In R. Junco, & D. M. Timm (Eds.), Using emerging technologies to enhance student engagement. New Directions for Student Services, Issue 124 (pp. 19–35). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Higher Education Research Institute. (2007). College freshmen and online social networking sites. Retrieved March 1, 2011 from. http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/PDFs/pubs/ briefs/brief-091107-SocialNetworking.pdf.
Generations online in 2009. Data memo
  • S Jones
  • S Fox
Jones, S., & Fox, S. (2009). Generations online in 2009. Data memo. Washington, DC: Pew Internet and American Life Project. Retrieved March 7, 2010, from. http://www. pewinternet.org/w/media//Files/Reports/2009/PIP_Generations_2009.pdf.
The digital divide survey snapshot Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation
  • Kaiser Family Foundation
Kaiser Family Foundation. (2004). The digital divide survey snapshot. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation. Retrieved March 1, 2011, from. http://www.kff.org/entmedia/ loader.cfm?url¼/commonspot/security/getfile.cfm&PageID¼46366.
Teaching, learning, and sharing: How today's higher education faculty use social media. Research report published by Pearson, The Babson Survey Research Group, and Converseon
  • M Moran
  • J Seaman
  • H Tinti-Kane
Moran, M., Seaman, J., & Tinti-kane, H. (2011). Teaching, learning, and sharing: How today's higher education faculty use social media. Research report published by Pearson, The Babson Survey Research Group, and Converseon. Retrieved July 20, 2011 from. http://www3.babson.edu/ESHIP/research-publications/upload/Teaching_Learning_and_ Sharing.pdf.
Social media and young adults. Washington, DC: Pew Internet and American Life Project
  • A Lenhart
  • K Purcell
  • A Smith
  • K Zickuhr
Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., & Zickuhr, K. (2010). Social media and young adults. Washington, DC: Pew Internet and American Life Project. Retrieved February 12, 2011, from: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults.aspx.