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Tea Chemistry

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The chemistry of tea as a beverage is reviewed in depth, covering both historical and current chemical perspectives. Special attention is given to the polyphenols in tea, although the general composition and properties are also treated. Current trends in tea science, particularly in the area of polyphenol complexation and antioxidant properties, are also covered. The need for a chemically based understanding, rather than one hypothesized from generalized and indirect observation, is stressed.
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... Indeed, tea consumption increased from 234 billion liters in 2013 to 289 billion liters in 2020 [3]. This volume is expected to grow further, with estimates that it will reach 297 billion liters by 2021 This fragrant beverage mainly consists of phenolic substances, flavonoids, caffeine, carbohydrates, organic acids, minerals, and volatile compounds [4]. Many scientific researchers have documented that the phenolic and flavonoid content present in tea are responsible for its antioxidant activity [5][6][7][8][9]. ...
... al., 2015), Epicatechin Monogallate (Kim et al., 2011;Pubchem), Hydroxyhydroquinone (Lee, Liang and Lin, 1995), Kaempferol (Finger and Engelhardt, 1991;Jeganathan et. al.,2016), Hieracin (Su et al., 2018), Cosmosiin also known as Apigenin (Harbowy and Balentine, 1997). ...
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