Article

The preparation of magnetic nanoparticles for applications in biomedicine. J Phys D Appl Phys 36:R182-R197

Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Journal of Physics D Applied Physics (Impact Factor: 2.72). 07/2003; 36(13):R182-R197. DOI: 10.1088/0022-3727/36/13/202

ABSTRACT

This review is focused on describing state-of-the-art synthetic routes for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles useful for biomedical applications. In addition to this topic, we have also described in some detail some of the possible applications of magnetic nanoparticles in the field of biomedicine with special emphasis on showing the benefits of using nanoparticles. Finally, we have addressed some relevant findings on the importance of having well-defined synthetic routes to produce materials not only with similar physical features but also with similar crystallochemical characteristics.

Full-text

Available from: Maria del Puerto Morales, Feb 18, 2014
  • Source
    • "[1] MNPs have been more applicable in various science such as biotechnology, biomedical, material science, engineering, and environmental areas. Therefore, much attention has been paid to synthesis of different kinds of MNPs, [2,3,4] as they have applied in gene and drug delivery, biomedical imaging and diagnostic biosensors. [5,6] Recently, many researches have been carried to develop processes and techniques that would produce 'monodispersed colloids' containing uniform nanoparticles in both size and shape. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Magnetic nanoparticles [MNPs] have unique features; especially the size which allows us to develop a new approach for different medical applications. Thus, the aims of this study were to develop and characterize the Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), in order to study the effect of different particle size on their properties. The monodisperse watersoluble magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method, in which two polyols: ethylene glycol (EG) and diethylene glycol (DEG) were chosen to act as solvent and reductant. The size and morphology of products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM); magnetic property was studied with a magnet; in vitro photothermal effect was investigated by semiconductor laser; in vivo biodistribution was measured using mice injected with Indocyanine green (ICG) at different time points. Results showed that monodisperse watersoluble Fe3O4 NPs with different sizes and uniform shape were prepared successfully. Furthermore, the products exhibited decent magnetic properties at room temperature. Besides, Fe3O4 NPs demonstrated good photosensitizing features due to its photothermal properties. In vivo Fe3O4 NPs accumulated in the tumor tissue, and different sizes of Fe3O4 NPs had different accumulation rates. Finally, our findings revealed that the synthesized Fe3O4 NPs could be used in different medical aspects especially in drug delivery technology and magnetic resonance imaging for cancer therapy.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2016 · World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research
  • Source
    • "In this framework, advanced synthesis approaches are necessary to achieve a strict control of the structural, morphological and chemical properties of nanomaterials, at the basis of a reproducible manipulation of their unique physical behavior. In the last 20 years, a great number of synthesis methods, such as sol–gel [8] [9], micellar [10], surfactant-assisted high-temperature decomposition techniques [11], and their suitable combinations have been strongly investigated to design new magnetic nanostructured materials [12]. One of the most important drawbacks of these methods is related to the low quantity of materials (100– 300 mg) that can be synthesized at the laboratory scale, representing a limit for large-scale application of nanoparticles (e.g. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Manganese spinel ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a solvothermal route based on high temperature decomposition of metal nitrates in the presence of different contents of Triethylene glycol. This simple and low cost method can be applied to prepare large quantities of nanoparticles (tens of grams). Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) confirmed that nanoparticles with a good crystalline quality were obtained. A good agreement between the average particle size calculated by PXRD and TEM was observed. Fourier-transform infrared spectra showed that polymer molecules have the tendency to form bonds with the surface of ferrite nanoparticles reducing the surface spin disorder, and then enhancing the saturation magnetization (MS). Therefore, much higher MS value (up to ∼91 emu/g at 5 K) was observed compared with that of bare nanoparticles without surfactant. The blocking temperature showed a remarkable shift to lower values with increasing the polymer starting amount. In addition, by increasing the polymer initial content, a more homogeneous size distribution was obtained and the initial strongly interacting superspin glass behavior changed to a weakly interacting superparamagnetic state.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials
    • "In this framework, advanced synthesis approaches are necessary to achieve a strict control of the structural, morphological and chemical properties of nanomaterials, at the basis of a reproducible manipulation of their unique physical behavior. In the last 20 years, a great number of synthesis methods, such as sol–gel [8] [9], micellar [10], surfactant-assisted high-temperature decomposition techniques [11], and their suitable combinations have been strongly investigated to design new magnetic nanostructured materials [12]. One of the most important drawbacks of these methods is related to the low quantity of materials (100– 300 mg) that can be synthesized at the laboratory scale, representing a limit for large-scale application of nanoparticles (e.g. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: In this study, superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared via a co-precipitation method under air atmosphere. The powders were studied using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). XRD and FTIR data confirmed the purity nanoparticles. The estimated crystallites size of 6.35 nm was in good accordance with particles size of particles obtained by TEM. In addition to this accordance, the ultrafine size of particles suggests formation of single domain ferrite nanoparticles. The saturation magnetization (51.25 emu/g) of sample was smaller than that of bulk magnetite because of magnetically dead layer in the shell of particles. The negligible coercivity and remanent magnetization shows that nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature which is an important property for application in medicine.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Aug 2015
Show more