Article

Insertion of Hickman central venous catheters by using angiographic techniques in patients with hematologic disorders

Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London, Great Britain.
American Journal of Roentgenology (Impact Factor: 2.73). 08/1992; 159(1):121-4. DOI: 10.2214/ajr.159.1.1609685
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

During a 9-month period, 69 Hickman catheters were successfully inserted by using angiographic techniques in 59 patients with hematologic disorders. A pneumothorax, which did not require drainage, developed in one patient. No other significant complications occurred at the time of insertion. Eighteen catheters were removed electively, 15 are still in situ, six were removed for thrombosis, and five were accidentally removed. Infection precipitated removal in six subjects. Ten patients died with the catheter in place. Five catheters were removed in patients with refractory septicemia of unknown origin. One catheter burst during an injection and had to be removed. Three patients were lost to follow-up. There were 3.24 infectious episodes per 1000 days of catheterization, more than twice the rate found in some other series. The results of this study are compatible with the growing body of evidence in favor of the angiographic insertion of Hickman catheters. The apparently high rate of infection is ascribed to factors other than insertion in the angiography suite, including the high proportion of bone marrow transplantation patients.

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