Nicotine potentiation of haloperidol in reducing tic frequency in Tourette's disorder

ArticleinAmerican Journal of Psychiatry 148(6):793-4 · July 1991with10 Reads
DOI: 10.1176/ajp.148.6.793 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
In an open, nonblind study, 10 patients with Tourette's disorder who were being treated with haloperidol were videotaped before, while, and after chewing nicotine gum. The frequency of tics was reduced significantly during the 30-minute gum-chewing period and during the 1 hour after gum chewing. Nicotine appears to potentiate haloperidol effects in patients with Tourette's disorder.
    • "Indeed, in 2 case reports negative effects of smoking cessation on TS have been reported [57, 59]. In initial open-label studies, chewing nicotine gum in addition to treatment with antipsychotics reduced tics in frequency and severity and improved concentration and attention [146, 216]. Similar effects were observed in a subsequent controlled trial involving nicotine gum plus haloperidol. "
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2011
    • "Indeed, in 2 case reports negative effects of smoking cessation on TS have been reported [57, 59]. In initial open-label studies, chewing nicotine gum in addition to treatment with antipsychotics reduced tics in frequency and severity and improved concentration and attention [146, 216]. Similar effects were observed in a subsequent controlled trial involving nicotine gum plus haloperidol. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: To develop a European guideline on pharmacologic treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS) the available literature was thoroughly screened and extensively discussed by a working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette syndrome (ESSTS). Although there are many more studies on pharmacotherapy of TS than on behavioral treatment options, only a limited number of studies meets rigorous quality criteria. Therefore, we have devised a two-stage approach. First, we present the highest level of evidence by reporting the findings of existing Cochrane reviews in this field. Subsequently, we provide the first comprehensive overview of all reports on pharmacological treatment options for TS through a MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE search for all studies that document the effect of pharmacological treatment of TS and other tic disorders between 1970 and November 2010. We present a summary of the current consensus on pharmacological treatment options for TS in Europe to guide the clinician in daily practice. This summary is, however, rather a status quo of a clinically helpful but merely low evidence guideline, mainly driven by expert experience and opinion, since rigorous experimental studies are scarce.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2011
    • "A few reports suggest that nicotine could help ameliorate tics. For example, Devor and Isenberg reported that TS symptoms improved if patients smoked [Devor and Isenberg, 1989], and McConville and colleagues found that nicotine could potentiate the effects of haloperidol in reducing tics [McConville et al., 1991]. Nicotine patches can lead to some improvement, but the positive effects are not durable and may be outweighed by side effects. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: TOURETTE SYNDROME (TS) IS A CHRONIC NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER CHARACTERIZED BY TICS: repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations. These symptoms can have a significant impact on patients' daily functioning across many domains. Tics tend to be most severe in child and adolescent sufferers, so their presence has the potential to impact a period of life that is both critical for learning and is often associated with the experience of greater social tension and self-consciousness than adulthood. Furthermore, control over tics that lead to physical impairment or self-injurious behaviour is of vital importance in maintaining health and quality of life. There are numerous complicating factors in the prescription of treatment for tics, due to both the side effects associated with alleviating agents and patient characteristics, such as age and comorbid conditions. This review summarizes literature pertaining to the efficacy and safety of both traditionally prescribed and more modern medications. We also discuss the merits of behavioural and surgical techniques and highlight newer emerging treatments. Although treatment response is to some extent variable, there are a number of agents that are clearly useful as first-line treatments for TS. Other interventions may be of most benefit to patients exhibiting refractory tics or more specific symptom profiles.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011
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