MR appearance of postoperative foreign body granuloma: Case report with pathologic confirmation

ArticleinAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology 12(1):190-2 · January 1991with2 Reads
Impact Factor: 3.59 · Source: PubMed
    • "...s tissue reaction peripherally, and central foreign body material lacking mobile protons (Fig. 10) [67]. This also explains the centrally nonenhancing area on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. ..."
      The lesion shows a moderate degree of peripheral contrast enhancement on T1- weighted images, believed to be related to an inflammatory foreign-body reaction. On T2-weighted images these lesions give low signal, presumably reflecting a dense fibrous tissue reaction peripherally, and central foreign body material lacking mobile protons (Fig. 10) [67]. This also explains the centrally nonenhancing area on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images.
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