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Mentoring needs of dietitians: The mentoring self-management program model

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Abstract

Twenty-one mentors and 24 mentees participated in a mentoring project in California. The results indicated that the mentoring needs among mentees were related to their career stage. Mentoring relationships were primarily serial rather than ongoing. Because of the present mercurial environment, individuals must plan much of their career development on their own. Recognition of the need for lifelong mentoring and knowledge of current findings can help dietitians move toward managing their own mentoring. We believe that the mentoring self-management program model provides the flexibility and close personal contact dietitians need to develop their fullest professional potential.

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... In this mentoring relationship, a mentee is responsible for and proactive about his/her own professional development by seeking mentoring-type relationships as the need arises. A person has a number of mentors simultaneously, each collaborating to develop the particular strengths of a mentee (Darling andSchartz 1991, as cited in McDonald 2003). ...
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The mentoring discovery process: helping people manage their mentoring
  • Darling