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Effects of Different Pot Mixtures on Pothos (Epipremnum aureum Lindl. and Andre ‘Golden Pothos’) Growth and Development

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Abstract: The growth of Epipremnum aureum Lindl. and Andre (‘Golden Pothos’) plants were evaluated using different pot mixtures. Plant growth was measured by 11 parameters: freshness, leaf area, leaf number, mean root length, root number, shoot number, root fresh and dry weight, shoot fresh and dry weight and mean shoot length. Parameters such as freshness, shoot length, shoot fresh and dry weight; root fresh and dry weight androot number were higher in the media containing only coco peat. Shoot number was higher in the m edium containing equal leaf-mold:sand mixture compared to the other media. Highest root length and leaf area were obtained in 1:3 peat moss/coco peat mixture. Leaf number was higher in the media containing 3:1 leaf-mold/cocopeat mixture. It is concluded that these differences represent a direct effect on the rooting process and that substrate characteristics are of the utmost importance for the quality of rooted cuttings.
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... Additionally, Mousa et al. (2004) found that pothos grew plants in peat moss alone or in mixture contained peat + sand (1:1, v/v) increased plant height comparing to plants grew in clay, peat + clay (1:1 v/v), peat + foam (3:1, v/v) and clay + foam (3:1, v/v) media. When Khayyat et al. (2007) planted Epipremnum aureum in mixtures of peat moss, cocopeat, sand and/ or leaf mold at several proportions, found that shoot length was significantly increased in plants grew in medium containing only cocopeat. While, sand medium resulted in less shoot length. ...
... Helal (2005) found that growing pothos plants in peat moss + sand, (1:1 v/v) medium resulted in the highest fresh and dry weights of shoot/pot comparing to plants grew in sand, peat moss, vermiculite and vermiculite + sand (1:1 v/v) media. When Khayyat et al. (2007) grew Golden pothos plants in twenty two potting mixtures comprised by mixing peat moss, cocopeat, sand and/ or leaf mold at several proportions for each, they found that shoot fresh and dry weights per plant were significantly increased in plants grew in medium containing only cocopeat. Sand medium resulted in less values of shoot fresh weight per plant, shoot length and leaf area per plant. ...
... The increase in root weight is due to more number of root and highest root girth and length of the roots. (Khayyat et al., (2007) [10] recorded that improved fresh weight in pothos by using coco peat substrate. ...
... The increase in root weight is due to more number of root and highest root girth and length of the roots. (Khayyat et al., (2007) [10] recorded that improved fresh weight in pothos by using coco peat substrate. ...
... The increased leaf area under shade may be the phenomenon of plant's adaptation to expose larger photosynthetic surface under shaded condition as reported in the earlier work by Khan et al. (2010) [4] . The tendency of increased leaf number under shade was also recorded by Singh (2014) [9] in coriander, Kalyanasundaram et al. (2012) [3] in sweet flag, Khayyat et al. (2011) [5] in turmeric, Swaminathan et al. (2012) [10] in davana and Hemla et al. (2009) [2] in ginger which further ascertains the present study. ...
... The increased leaf area under shade may be the phenomenon of plant's adaptation to expose larger photosynthetic surface under shaded condition as reported in the earlier work by Khan et al. (2010) [4] . The tendency of increased leaf number under shade was also recorded by Singh (2014) [9] in coriander, Kalyanasundaram et al. (2012) [3] in sweet flag, Khayyat et al. (2011) [5] in turmeric, Swaminathan et al. (2012) [10] in davana and Hemla et al. (2009) [2] in ginger which further ascertains the present study. ...
... In contrast to the other substrate types, the aeration in the soil was low, which could have contributed to the lower root formation. Moreover, in a similar study, Khayyat et al. [82] observed that better aeration, drainage, and water holding capacity are important parameters for the improved root formation in Epipremnum aureum cuttings, indicating that rooting may be influenced by other factors, such as proper drainage and aeration properties of the substrate used for plant growth. ...
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Chrysanthemum indicum is an important ornamental and medicinal plant that is often difficult to propagate commercially because of its poor germination and low seed viability. This plant is mostly propagated by cutting, but the rooting is slow and non-uniform. The present investigation evaluated the regeneration capacity of stem cutting by examining the influence of auxins, growth medium, temperature, and explant type on adventitious root formation in C. indicum. The auxin-treated cuttings were planted in different growth substrates under greenhouse conditions. Among the different auxins tested, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) more effectively induced roots. The cutting position of stock plants influenced rooting capacity. Cutting the stock plants from the apical region enhanced root number and length in the explants. Among the different explant types, apical stem cuts with 2000 ppm IBA produced a significantly higher number of adventitious roots when grown in vermiculite and perlite (V + P) at a ratio of 1:1 at 25 °C. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed that protocatechuic acid, gentisic acid, chlorogenic acid, biochanin A, salicylic acid, caffeic acid, glycitein, and luteolin were the most dominant phenolic compounds present in C. indicum. These results indicate that IBA treatment promoted the synthesis and accumulation of phenolic compounds in C. indicum stem cuttings at the time of root formation. The present results demonstrate that applying auxins is essential for early root initiation and higher rooting success and thus may be beneficial for vegetative C. indicum propagation.
... The maximum fresh weight of roots was recorded in cuttings grown in a mixture of Coco peat : Vermiculite : Perlite could be related to the better aeration and drainage conditions and water maintenance capability and in 2000 ppm IBA increase the number of roots and production of more number of roots. These findings are in accordance with the findings of Wahab et al. [12] in guava, Khayyat et al. [13] in pothos; Moreno et al. [14] in cape gooseberry and Rajkumar et al. [6] in pomegranate. ...
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Selected physical and chemical properties of thirteen coconut coir wastes (pith plus short- to medium-length fibres) commercially produced in six countries from Africa, America and Asia, were evaluated as growing media or growing media constituents for containerised plants. Coir waste was evaluated as a lightweight material and showed a high total porosity, over 94 % (vol). It exhibited a very high air content together with fairly low easily-available water. Total water-holding capacity in coir waste was lower than peat. pH was slightly acidic and salinity varied between 0.4 and 6.0 dS m-l. Cation exchange capacity ranged from 32 to 95 m.eJlOO g and C/N ratios averaged 117. Coir waste contained more lignin and cellulose, but less hemicellulose when compared with peat. The amount of naturally-occurring available nutrients was low, especially mineral nitrogen, calcium and magnesium. On the other hand, indigenous phosphorus and potassium contents in coir waste were extremely high. Remarkable differences were observed between sources with respect to physical and chemical properties. Two individual coir waste samples from Mexico and Sri Lanka were manipulated in order to prepare suitable coir waste-based container media for growing Calendula officinalis and Coleus blumei. The removal of excess salts by controlled leaching did not improve plant growth and development in comparison with unleached coir waste. No N immobilisation was found in coir waste-based media with a conventional fertilisation programme. As a consequence of the particular chemical properties of coir waste, nutritional regimes may need to be adjusted on a crop-by-crop basis. The two plant species tested grew equally well or better in the best coir waste media than in the control mix composed of 3:1 (vol:vol) Sphagnum peat and vermiculite.
Quality of C100, L75P25, C25S75 and L25C75 mixtures were the Pelargonium graveolens cutting as affected by the best treatments compared to all of the other rooting medium
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Altman, A. and D. Freudenberg, 1983. Quality of C100, L75P25, C25S75 and L25C75 mixtures were the Pelargonium graveolens cutting as affected by the best treatments compared to all of the other rooting medium. Sci. Hortic., 19: 379-385. treatments (Fig. 13).
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