Transient diabetes following chicken pox

ArticleinThe Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 38(9):663-4 · October 1990with22 Reads
Source: PubMed
Abstract
The paper describes two individuals presenting with acute insulin dependent diabetes mellitus for a brief and transient period. Both had had chicken pox infection in the immediate past. After establishing good diabetic control, insulin was withdrawn over a few weeks. Follow-up for the next two years did not reveal recurrence of diabetes. A causal relation between varicella zoster virus and the onset of diabetes is suggested.
    • "Furthermore, viruses [8] and virus-specific antibodies are more commonly found in individuals with recent disease onset9101112. Among viruses implicated in human T1D are cytomegalovirus [13,14] , coxsackie B [15,16], mumps [17], rubella [18], Epstein–Barr virus [19,20], rotavirus [21], and varicella zoster virus [22]. Reports of an epidemic outbreak of T1D may also imply environmental factors in the etiology of T1D232425 . "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The digestive tract hosts trillions of bacteria that interact with the immune system and can influence the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory immune responses. Recent studies suggest that alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota may be linked with the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Data from the biobreeding diabetes prone (BBDP) and the LEW1.WR1 models of T1D support the hypothesis that intestinal bacteria may be involved in early disease mechanisms. The data indicate that cross-talk between the gut microbiota and the innate immune system may be involved in islet destruction. Whether a causal link between intestinal microbiota and T1D exists, the identity of the bacteria and the mechanism whereby they promote the disease remain to be examined. A better understanding of the interplay between microbes and innate immune pathways in early disease stages holds promise for the design of immune interventions and disease prevention in genetically susceptible individuals.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012
    • "To date, over a half-dozen human viruses have been reported to be associated with human type 1 diabetes (Table 1). These include Coxsackie B virus252627, rubella virus [28,29], mumps virus [30,31], cytomegalovirus323334 , Epstein-Barr virus [35,36], varicella zostar virus [37] , retrovi- rus [38,39] and rotavirus [40]. About nine viruses have been reported to be associated with the development of type 1 diabetes in animals (Table 2 ). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Genetic factors are believed to be a major component for the development of T1D, but the concordance rate for the development of diabetes in identical twins is only about 40%, suggesting that nongenetic factors play an important role in the expression of the disease. Viruses are one environmental factor that is implicated in the pathogenesis of T1D. To date, 14 different viruses have been reported to be associated with the development of T1D in humans and animal models. Viruses may be involved in the pathogenesis of T1D in at least two distinct ways: by inducing beta cell-specific autoimmunity, with or without infection of the beta cells, [e.g. Kilham rat virus (KRV)] and by cytolytic infection and destruction of the beta cells (e.g. encephalomyocarditis virus in mice). With respect to virus-mediated autoimmunity, retrovirus, reovirus, KRV, bovine viral diarrhoea-mucosal disease virus, mumps virus, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are discussed. With respect to the destruction of beta cells by cytolytic infection, encephalomyocarditis virus, mengovirus and Coxsackie B viruses are discussed. In addition, a review of transgenic animal models for virus-induced autoimmune diabetes is included, particularly with regard to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, influenza viral proteins and the Epstein-Barr viral receptor. Finally, the prevention of autoimmune diabetes by infection of viruses such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is discussed.
    Article · Jan 2003
    • "To date, over a half-dozen human viruses have been reported to be associated with human type 1 diabetes (Table 1). These include Coxsackie B virus252627, rubella virus [28,29], mumps virus [30,31], cytomegalovirus323334 , Epstein-Barr virus [35,36], varicella zostar virus [37] , retrovi- rus [38,39] and rotavirus [40]. About nine viruses have been reported to be associated with the development of type 1 diabetes in animals (Table 2 ). "
    Article · Jul 1995
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