The Role of Basal Cells in Attachment of Columnar Cells to the Basal Lamina of the Trachea

ArticleinAmerican Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology 1(6):463-9 · January 1990with5 Reads
DOI: 10.1165/ajrcmb/1.6.463 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
The mechanism by which basal cells play a role in attachment of airway epithelium to the basal lamina has not been determined. Our hypothesis is that basal cells form a structural bridge between columnar cells and the basal lamina via hemidesmosomes, the cytoskeleton, and desmosomes. To evaluate this hypothesis, we determined the percentage of the columnar cell surface area associated with attachment to the basal lamina and the basal cell in tracheal epithelia of different heights. Tracheas from mice, hamsters, rats, bonnet monkeys, cats, and sheep were prepared for electron microscopy by standard techniques. The height of the epithelia ranged from 8.6 microns in the hamster to 56.8 microns in the sheep. The number of basal cells/100 microns ranged from 3.4 in the hamster to 21.4 in the sheep. The percentage of the basal lamina covered by basal cells increased from 32.6 in the hamster to 94.7 in the sheep. In the shorter epithelia of the hamster, 32% of the columnar cell attachment to the basal lamina was indirect through basal cells, and in the taller epithelia of the sheep, 92% of the columnar cell attachment was by this means. Conversely, the percentage of columnar cell surface in contact with the basal lamina decreased from 67.4% in the hamster to 5.3% in the sheep. These data demonstrate that basal cells play a role in attachment of columnar epithelium to the basal lamina by presenting a surface area for cell-to-cell attachment, thus acting as a bridge between columnar cells and the basal lamina.
    • "Direct contacts between columnar cells and the basement membrane account for only 3% of attachments . Evans and colleagues reported a close correlation (r ¼ 0.97) between the number of basal epithelial cells and the height of the epithelium across examined species (Evans et al., 1989). The same group also indicated a positive correlation between basal cell number per unit length of the basement membrane and animal size. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles constitute the branched conduit for transport of gases to and from the lung parenchyma. The airways regulate the flow and condition the inhaled air. To accomplish these tasks, mammalian airways have acquired a number of adaptive mechanisms and functions, which are reflected in their structure.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · BMC Veterinary Research
    • "Even so the murine pulmonary epithelium is rather different from the ones of the large mammals. In small mammals such as rodents, the proximal airways are composed of a layer comprising one or two cells thick that rests on a very sparse network of basal cells78910. In large mammals, this epithelium is characterized by pseudo-stratified columnar cells together with ciliated, secretory, and parabasal cells linked to a foundation of basal cells [11,12]. "
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014
    • "Even so the murine pulmonary epithelium is rather different from the ones of the large mammals. In small mammals such as rodents, the proximal airways are composed of a layer comprising one or two cells thick that rests on a very sparse network of basal cells78910. In large mammals, this epithelium is characterized by pseudo-stratified columnar cells together with ciliated, secretory, and parabasal cells linked to a foundation of basal cells [11,12]. "
    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2014 · BMC Veterinary Research
Show more

Recommended publications

Discover more