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High abundance of viruses found in aquatic environments

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Abstract

The concentration of bacteriophages in natural unpolluted waters is in general believed to be low, and they have therefore been considered ecologically unimportant. Using a new method for quantitative enumeration, we have found up to 2.5 x 10(8) virus particles per millilitre in natural waters. These concentrations indicate that virus infection may be an important factor in the ecological control of planktonic micro-organisms, and that viruses might mediate genetic exchange among bacteria in natural aquatic environments.
© 1989Nature Publishing Group
© 1989Nature Publishing Group
... Accordingly, microorganisms, including pathogenic ones, are more abundant in marine environments [29,30]. However, despite being continuously exposed to these microbialrich challenging environments, marine organisms keep healthy under normal circumstances through a complex network of defense mechanisms that have had to co-evolve under such conditions of selective pressure. ...
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It's about applications of bacteriophages in microbiology and biotechnology
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