Article

When your manuscript is rejected

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Abstract

Anyone who submits a manuscript for peer review is at high risk for experiencing rejection. Dealing with rejection is not easy. Sometimes major revisions, based on the reviewers' comments, can help salvage the manuscript. The only way to avoid rejection is to avoid submitting one's work. Even when rejections are received, one has the satisfaction of at least knowing that an effort was made; remember, some people never get that far. Persistence in trying can eventually help one to become a better writer and, thus, a contributor to the literature of nursing.

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... Mentoring is essential for a successful transition into an academic setting. 14,19,25,26 A support system, in the form of a mentor, is a valuable resource in new faculty orientation, and faculty achieve meaningful relationships and positive outcomes from structured mentoring programs. 12,18 Mentoring benefits include reduced turnover; better recruitment; improved employee satisfaction; enhanced clinical, professional, research, and academic development; career advancement; and better nurse educator and student outcomes. ...
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... Mentoring is essential for a successful transition into an academic setting. 14,19,25,26 A support system, in the form of a mentor, is a valuable resource in new faculty orientation, and faculty achieve meaningful relationships and positive outcomes from structured mentoring programs. 12,18 Mentoring benefits include reduced turnover; better recruitment; improved employee satisfaction; enhanced clinical, professional, research, and academic development; career advancement; and better nurse educator and student outcomes. ...
Presentation
Create an effective nurse faculty orientation program using a mentor/mentee chart and new nurse faculty orientation checklist.
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Technical Report
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