Article

Isolation and mapping of a polymorphic DNA sequence (pTHH26) on chromosome 11 [D11S149]

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  • Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama, Japan
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... DNA probes used were as follows: WT33, a cDNA clone for the candidate WT1 locus (Call et al. 1990); pSBE1.2 (D11S323), an anonymous 11p13 probe (Huff et al. 1990a); and pTHH26 (D11S149), an anonymous 11q probe (Holm et al. 1988 mor tissue by a modification of the method of Chirgwin et al. (1979). Pulverized snap-frozen tumor was homogenized in 4 M guanidine isothiocynate, was laid onto 5.7 M cesium chloride, and was centrifuged at 32,000 rpm for 20 h. ...
Article
The inactivation of two alleles at a locus on the short arm of chromosome 11 (band 11p13) has been suggested to be critical steps in the development of Wilms tumor (WT), a childhood kidney tumor. Two similar candidate WT cDNA clones (WT33 and LK15) have recently been identified on the basis of both their expression in fetal kidney and their location within the smallest region of overlap of somatic 11p13 deletions in some tumors. These homozygous deletions, however, are large and potentially affect more than one gene. Using a cDNA probe to the candidate gene, we have analyzed DNA from both normal and tumor tissue from WT patients, in an effort to detect rearrangements at this locus. We report here a patient with bilateral WT who is heterozygous for a small (less than 11 kb) germinal deletion within this candidate gene. DNA from both tumors is homozygous for this intragenic deletion allele, which, by RNA-PRC sequence analysis, is predicted to encode a protein truncated by 180 amino acids. These data support the identification of this locus as an 11p13 WT gene (WT1) and provide direct molecular data supporting the two-hit mutational model for WT.
... pMS51/D11S97 came from ICI (27). p3C7/D11S288, phpepl4-21/PGA, pHBI59/D11S146, pMCMP1/PYGM, and pTHH26/D11S149 were obtained from the ATCC (28)(29)(30)(31)(32)(33). cCI11-297/D11S471, cCI11-288/ D11S469, cCI11-319/D11S480, and cCI11-4/D11S427 have been published (34). ...
Article
Full-text available
We have constructed a physical map of the region q12-13 on chromosome 11 by combining data generated from a panel of radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrids and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Twenty different genetic markers have been sublocalized and ordered within this region and a total of 8.0 megabases has been mapped in detail using rare-cutting restriction endonucleases and PFGE. In two instances, the long-range restriction PFGE map spans the total distance between pairs of loci that have been previously mapped by genetic linkage in reference families. Comparison of this physical map with the available linkage map indicates a great variation in the recombination frequency over the region. The recombination rate is higher than expected, particularly for markers flanking the MEN1 region. Thus, for the closest pair of linked markers on the centromeric side, one centimorgan corresponds to approximately 300 kilobases, and for markers on the telomeric side, one centimorgan corresponds to approximately 350-600 kilobases.
... Probe p3C7 (D11S288, formerly D6S9; Leach et al. 1984), pHBI59 (DlS146; Nakamura et al. 1988a), pTHH26 (DllS149; Holm et al., 1988), and pMCMP1 (PYGM; Carlson et al. 1988 ) have been reported elsewhere . Phage 6-3 (DllS8S; Maslen et al. 1987) and pPGA101 or pcAGP9 (PGA, pepsinogen A [Frants et al. 1985; Taggart et al. 1987]) were gifts from Drs. M. Litt, R. T. Taggart, and B. Zelle, respectively. ...
Article
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-1), a Mendelian disorder with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, causes hyperplasia in the parathyroid glands and hyperplasia or neoplasm in the anterior pituitary gland and/or the pancreatic islets. The genetic defect responsible for MEN-1 in three families was recently mapped to the long arm of chromosome II by linkage between the MEN-1 locus and the gene for skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) at 11q13. We have constructed a genetic linkage map of seven markers in the vicinity of the MEN-1 locus that has allowed us to map more precisely the gene associated with MEN-1; the target region has been narrowed to about 12 cM. The closely linked markers will be useful also for identification of likely carriers in families in which an allele responsible for MEN-1 segregates.
Article
1. Guidance is given for the selection of reference markers by the Chromosome Workshops, and their entry into GDB using Map Manager, as an interim set of DNA segments and sequences providing a framework map within which other markers and sites may be positioned. 2. Criteria for issuing D-numbers are restated. It is recommended that Chromosome Committee Chairs should be consulted about assignment of new D-numbers to markers which are not polymorphic when there are already many markers on a chromosome. It is recommended that polymorphic markers should be linked either physically or genetically to an existing marker before submission if possible. 3. It is recommended that the Tables which are now published as part of the DNA Committee Report should be converted from cytogenetic location order into map order by the next Human Genome Workshop, and that wherever possible markers and sites should be presented as a linear array relative to the framework provided by reference markers. Chromosome Committees and Chromosome Workshops should liaise with the DNA Committee to determine priorities for this during the coming year. 4. It is recommended that the DNA Committee continue as a major advisory committee to Human Genome Workshops and individual Chromosome Workshops, in order to provide policy guidelines from the genetics communities on the mapping of DNA polymorphisms, sequences and sites, their integration into databases and for other uses.
Article
Analyses to detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were performed at 11 polymorphic loci on chromosome 11 and, using a polymorphic CA repeat sequence in the WT1 gene, on a series of 39 tumours from 28 unilateral and 10 tumours from 6 bilateral Wilms' tumour (WT) patients. LOH was seen in 13 out of 35 patients including 12 out of 29 unilateral tumours, but only one of 10 bilateral tumours. This suggests that bilateral WT represents a subgroup of WT in which tumour initiating events less frequently involve LOH on chromosome 11 and that either epigenetic events, point mutations or another non-chromosome 11p locus are important in bilateral tumours. The observation of LOH in one WT but not another WT in a bilateral WT patient provides evidence that these tumours arising in the same patient are not monoclonal proliferations and most likely arise via different molecular pathways.
Article
A linkage map of mouse Chromosome (Chr) 19 was constructed using an interspecific cross and markers defined by restriction fragment length variants. The map includes 20 markers, 9 of which had not been mapped previously in the mouse. The data further defined the relationship between genes on mouse Chr 19 and those on the long arm of human Chr 10 and the pericentric region of the long arm of human Chr 11. The comparative mapping analysis suggests that the proximal segment of mouse Chr 19 may contain the MEN1 locus and that the current study has identified additional genes that may be useful for positional cloning of this putative tumor suppressor gene.
Article
We describe 14 new restriction fragment length polymorphisms, corresponding to 13 loci on the long arm of chromosome 11. A detailed genetic map of chromosome 11q has been constructed from these and other loci (a total of 31 loci) typed in 59 reference families. The 23 most informative markers were selected to establish a map with a strongly supported order; regional localizations are provided for eight other markers. The loci span 88 cM in males and 148 cM in females and form a dense continuum on 11q. These ordered polymorphic markers will be of help in studying the genes responsible for several diseases that have been localized to this region, including genes responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN1), ataxia telangiectasia (AT), tuberous sclerosis (TSC), and some forms of asthma and rhinitis.
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DNA amplification events that occur at 11q13 in human carcinomas are complex, and amplicons were shown to exhibit numerous discontinuities that could be used as tools for mapping this genomic area. A statistical nearest-neighbor analysis of the amplification patterns of several 11q13 loci in a panel of amplified DNAs was performed in the region of 11q13 centromeric from BCL1. It was strongly correlated with the physical linkages that we established between the same markers. Taken together, our results led to a map of 14 genes and four anonymous probes located in this area.
Article
Multilocus linkage analysis is investigated from the viewpoint of the efficiency of recombination estimates under different strategies for detecting linkage and determining gene order within a linkage group. We consider the appropriateness of assuming no interference with data available in human genetic studies. Examples are given to show the significance of multilocus analysis in humans. A computer program package, LINKAGE, for multilocus linkage analysis is described.