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Marketing inherited a model of exchange from economics, which had a dominant logic based on the exchange of "goods," which usually are manufactured output. The dominant logic focused on tangible resources, embedded value, and transactions. Over the past several decades, new perspectives have emerged that have a revised logic focused on intangible resources, the cocreation of value, and relationships. The authors believe that the new per- spectives are converging to form a new dominant logic for marketing, one in which service provision rather than goods is fundamental to economic exchange. The authors explore this evolving logic and the corresponding shift in perspective for marketing scholars, marketing practitioners, and marketing educators.
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... Glynn and Lehtinen (1995) emphasized that intangibility, inseparability, and heterogeneity features of services necessitated being focused on interaction and relationships. Vargo and Lusch (2004) stated that the service-centered view is inherently both consumercentric and relational. Grönroos (2009, p. 397) claimed that "services are inherently relational and relational marketing requires the adoption of a service logic." ...
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