Increased frequency of complete hydatidiform mole in women with repeated abortion

ArticleinGynecologic Oncology 31(2):310-4 · November 1988with4 Reads
Impact Factor: 3.77 · DOI: 10.1016/S0090-8258(88)80009-X · Source: PubMed
Abstract

The association between spontaneous abortion and gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) has been investigated in a study based on 93 women with 2 consecutive (repeated) spontaneous abortions and 82 control subjects who delivered normal babies. Nine molar pregnancies were observed among 7 of the 93 cases of repeated abortion while no control reported previous GTD. This difference was statistically significant and was not explained by allowance for age and number of pregnancies between cases and controls (chi 2(1) = 4.20; P = 0.04). When the observed number (9) of hydatidiform mole in the 385 pregnancies of the women with repeated abortion was compared with the expected one (0.28) based on the regional frequency data, the estimated relative risk was 32.1 with a 95% confidence interval from 13.9 to 63.3. The present findings confirm the association between GTD and spontaneous abortion and indicate that the risk is larger in women with repeated abortions.

    • "...ncy of moles is higher in patients with recurrent SAs than in women from the general population [8,25]. Furthermore, women with recurrent moles may have CHMs, PHMs and SAs, indicating that these three h..."
      Murdoch et al. [10] pointed out that NLRP7, in addition to causing RHMs, may also be responsible for causing recurrent abortions, stillbirths and intrauterine growth retardation. Additionally, epidemiological studies have shown that the frequency of moles is higher in patients with recurrent SAs than in women from the general population [8,25]. Furthermore, women with recurrent moles may have CHMs, PHMs and SAs, indicating that these three histopathological entities have, at least in some cases, the same underlying etiology and are a continuous spectrum of the same condition [24].
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    • "...ave shown that the incidence of HMs in women with two or more spontaneous abortions is 7[48]and 32[49]times higher than the incidence of moles in the general population. Recurrence of moles occurs in 0...."
      Previous history of spontaneous abortions is a strong risk factor for subsequent moles and choriocarcinoma, and indicates a genetic predisposition in these patients[32,454647. Two independent studies, from the US and Italy, have shown that the incidence of HMs in women with two or more spontaneous abortions is 7[48]and 32[49]times higher than the incidence of moles in the general population. Recurrence of moles occurs in 0.57 to 5% of all women who have had one mole2829303132333435.
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  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The association between spontaneous abortion and ectopic pregnancy was evaluated in a case-control study conducted on 161 women (cases) with recurrent spontaneous abortions (two or more consecutive spontaneous abortions) and 170 control subjects who delivered normal infants. The risk of ectopic pregnancy in women with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion was about fourfold that of controls (relative risk adjusted for age and number of pregnancies = 4.3; 95% confidence interval 1.4-14.7). This association was confirmed by comparing the observed number of extrauterine pregnancies in women with recurrent spontaneous abortions with the expected number computed from regional data on the frequency of ectopic pregnancies; the estimated relative risk was 3.7, with a 95% confidence interval of 2.2-7.0. The present report found an association between spontaneous abortions and ectopic pregnancies, suggesting some common risk/etiologic factors for these two reproductive failures.
    No preview · Article · Mar 1989 · Obstetrics and Gynecology
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  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Careful pathological studies of spontaneous abortion material are few and our understanding of the pathogenesis of abortion is correspondingly poor. The examination of abortuses is often delegated to the most junior pathologist, hence the widespread belief that there is little to gain from such studies. However, pathology departments do have a useful role to play in the management of abortion. In cases of repeated abortion, pathological abnormalities in mother or fetus may point to a treatable cause. Some abortion specimens may yield information which will modify maternal management, in cases of infection or trophoblast neoplasia for example. Accurate description of aborted material may help to elucidate obscure mechanisms involved in this most common of pregnancy complications. With a trend towards smaller families, later in life and with earlier bonding to a fetus often visualised by ultrasound in the first trimester, the emotional impact of spontaneous abortion is greater than ever. For all these reasons, simple products of conception should perhaps be treated more seriously in the diagnostic pathology laboratory.
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  • No preview · Article · Feb 1993 · Clinical Oncology
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  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A spontaneous abortion (miscarriage) is the natural termination of pregnancy before the fetus is capable of extrauterine life (Scott, 1986). Spontaneous abortions can be divided into two groups: early abortions, up to 12 weeks of age, and late abortions 13–18 weeks of age (Ornoy et al., 1981). There are different terms for fetuses who die later in pregnancy. Early still-birth is considered to be between the 20ieth and 24th week of pregnancy. Stillborn infants are all infants who die from the 25th week of pregnancy onwards.
    No preview · Chapter · Jan 1994
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