Article

Vancomycin Dosing Chart for Use in Patients With Renal Impairment

Department of Pharmacy Services, Medical College Hospitals, Medical College of Ohio, Toledo.
American Journal of Kidney Diseases (Impact Factor: 5.9). 02/1988; 11(1):15-9. DOI: 10.1016/S0272-6386(88)80168-9
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

A new vancomycin dosing chart for use in patients with impaired renal function is described. The chart has been adapted from a previously published nomogram, based on a linear relationship between vancomycin clearance and creatinine clearance. Doses are designed to achieve an average steady-state serum concentration of approximately 15 mg/L. Use of the chart necessitates first measuring or estimating the patient's body weight and creatinine clearance. The chart provides the advantages of generating an exact dose and dosing interval, as well as being somewhat easier to use than the original nomogram. Predicted average steady-state serum concentrations resulting from the dosing chart range from 12.1 to 18.2 mg/L, with a mean of 15.0 mg/L.

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