Article

MRI of joint fluid in the normal and ischemic hip

American Journal of Roentgenology (Impact Factor: 2.73). 07/1986; 146(6):1215-8. DOI: 10.2214/ajr.146.6.1215
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

MR images in 36 hips with documented avascular necrosis and 80 hips without evidence of joint disease were studied to determine the amount and appearance of fluid in the joint. All MRI examinations were done on a 1.5-T machine and included coronal images made with relative T2 weighting (repetition times = 2000-2500 msec, echo delays = 60-100 msec). The amount of joint fluid, which had an intense signal higher than fat, was graded from 0 to 3 and analyzed with respect to the patient's age and radiographic stage of avascular necrosis. Joint fluid was seen in 84% of presumed normal hips. Only four (5%) of 80 had enough fluid to surround the femoral neck (grade 2), and none had sufficient fluid to distend the joint capsule (grade 3). In comparison, 21 (58%) of 36 hips with avascular necrosis had grade-2 or grade-3 effusions (p less than 0.005), and some fluid was seen in all. Grade-3 effusions were seen in seven (50%) of 14 hips with flattening of the femoral head, compared with only one (5%) of 20 in which the femoral contour was normal. It is concluded that small amounts of fluid are present in both normal hips and those with avascular necrosis. In avascular necrosis, increased joint fluid may be present before radiographic abnormalities occur, but it is greatest after there is flattening of the femoral head. MRI is a highly sensitive method for detecting fluid in the hip joint.

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    • "The degree of joint fluid was graded as described by Mitchell et al. [25] , grade 0, no sign of effusion; grade 1, trace of effusion; grade 2, continual effusion; grade 3, effusion with distension of the capsule. Hydrops was defined as joint fluid Pgrade 2. The synovial thickness was measured as the observed maximum thickness of the synovium (P2) in any part of the joint. "
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    ABSTRACT: Aim of the WorkTo evaluate the role of MRI in diagnosing hip arthritis and correlating it with clinical and laboratory assessments in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).Patients and Methods The study included 30 patients with JIA with mean age of 13.5 ± 4.5. Disease activity was evaluated by DAS28 score, physician’s global assessment (PGA–VAS), patient’s global assessment (VASglobal) and the assessment of functional ability by (CHAQ). Hip joint evaluation was assessed by hip pain on movement and the degree of limitation of motion (score 0–3). Plain radiography and MRI of the hip joint were performed for all patients. MRI score was done.ResultsMRI of hips was abnormal in 12 (40%) of all patients: 2/8 (25%) of the oligoarticular group, 4/13 (30.8%) of the polyarticular group, 5/7 (71.4%) of the systemic onset group and 1/2(50%) of the enthesitis related group. Comparing mean values of MR scores of the four clinical subsets showed significant difference (p < 0.001). Patients with active disease showed higher MR scores (3.7 ± 1.5) than those with inactive disease (2.1 ± .9) [p < 0.002]. Presence of effusion and gadolinium enhancement were significantly higher in active hips (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001 respectively). VAS–PGA and ESR were significantly correlated with MRI score (p < 0.02 and <0.05 respectively).ConclusionMRI of the hip plays an important role in the study of patients with JIA as it reveals early joint involvement and evaluates the extent of joint disease. This permits intervention at an appropriate time with suitable treatment. Clinical and laboratory findings are inadequate diagnostic tools for the assessment of hip arthritis when comparing with MRI.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Egyptian Rheumatologist
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    • "The degree of joint fluid was graded as described by Mitchell et al. [21]: grade 0, no sign of effusion; grade 1, trace of effusion; grade 2, continual effusion; grade 3, effusion with distension of the capsule. Hydrops was defined as joint fluid ≥ grade 2. "
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    ABSTRACT: MRI is sensitive for joint inflammation, but its ability to separate subgroups of arthritis in children has been questioned. Infectious arthritis (IA), postinfectious arthritis (PA), transient arthritis (TA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are subgroups that may need early, different treatment. To determine whether MRI findings differ in IA, PA/TA and JIA in recent-onset childhood arthritis. Fifty-nine children from a prospective study of incidence of arthritis (n = 216) were, based on clinical and biochemical criteria, examined by MRI. Joint fluid, synovium, bone marrow, soft tissue and cartilage were scored retrospectively and analysed by Pearson chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Fifty-nine children had MRI of one station. IA was suggested by bone marrow oedema (OR 7.46, P = 0.011) and absence of T1-weighted and T2-weighted low signal intensity synovial tissue (OR 0.06, P = 0.015). Furthermore, soft-tissue oedema and reduced contrast enhancement in the epiphyses were more frequent in children with IA. JIA correlated positively with low signal intensity synovial tissue (OR 13.30, P < 0.001) and negatively with soft-tissue oedema (OR 0.20, P = 0.018). No significant positive determinants were found for PA/TA, but bone marrow oedema, soft-tissue oedema, irregular thickened synovium and low signal intensity synovial tissue was less frequent than in IA/JIA. In children with high clinical suspicion of recent onset arthritis, there was a significant difference in the distribution of specific MRI features among the diagnostic groups.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Pediatric Radiology
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    • "The amount of joint effusion was measured on T2-fat-suppressed coronal images and graded as 0 (none), 1 (minimal), 2 (surround femoral neck), and 3 (distention of capsule) [13]. "
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY: Data of 17 male patients with a final diagnosis of transient osteoporosis (TO) of the hip seen at the radiology department of a university hospital over a period of 7 years were retrospectively studied. Comparison of the proportion of doctors among TO cases with that among other hip joint pathologies revealed a significant difference. PURPOSE: The objective of this study is to present clinical and radiological findings of hip TO and to assess the association of the condition with patients' occupation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of 17 male patients with a final diagnosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip seen at the radiology department of a university hospital over a period of 7 years were retrospectively studied. RESULTS: The diagnosis of transient hip osteoporosis was in accordance with the published literature for clinical, imaging findings, and laboratory results. Among the 17 cases of male transient hip osteoporosis, 65% were physicians and 12% were commercial pilots. Comparison of the proportion of doctors among TO cases with that among other hip joint pathologies revealed a significant difference. Abnormal low hormone levels of testosterone and 25-cholicalciferol (vitamin D) were detected in three and two patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: The preponderance of physicians among patients with transient hip osteoporosis has not been previously reported. Etiological contribution of endocrine pathology and type of occupation to the causation of transient osteoporosis merits further research.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2009 · Archives of Osteoporosis
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