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Pathokinesiology—The Clinical Implications from a Cardiopulmonary Perspective

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Abstract

By way of introducing this material to you, I believe a few confessions are in order. Number one, I know why I was invited to participate in this symposium. It is no secret that squeaky wheels get greased, and the cardiopulmonary physical therapists have been somewhat squeaky on the topic of pathokinesiology. I credit and compliment the symposium's program committee for their sagacity and chutzpah in inviting the squeaky wheels to participate. They recognized that physical therapists need to get to the business of “making honey” as Dr. Hislop directed us.¹ Yet, you cannot stir up the bees if you know where the nest is and walk around it or if you have been living contentedly inside. To make the best honey, the bees must examine old flying routes, find new routes, and sample pollen from all the flowers. Number two, I am not intimately familiar with the term “pathokinesiology.”

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... Recently, Zadai discussed the clinical implications of Hislop's framework with respect to cardiopulmonary physical therapy. 2 The purpose of this article is to illustrate how the integration of specific physiological principles can further extend the contributions of Hislop and Zadai to cardiopulmonary physical therapy. ...
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