‘Recognition of Mother's voice in early infancy’

Nature (Impact Factor: 41.46). 12/1974; 252(5479):123-4. DOI: 10.1038/252123a0
Source: PubMed
ABSTRACT
CERTAIN characteristics of the human voice at normal levels have a great influence on the neonate1, and infants 1 month old can detect fine differences in speech-like sounds2,3. This enables a selective response to take place when the child meets adults. From birth, babies will turn towards the source of a sound, and this orientation to a voice helps them to learn about faces. We have also observed that infants are more interested in their mother's face when she is talking.
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    • "Firm Sustained Touch, Vocal Soothing and Eye Contact Exposure to the mother's voice begins in utero. Newborn term infants recognize their mother's voice within minutes of birth and prefer it to a non-maternal voice [38][39][40]. Yet, there is some evidence that preterm infants may not recognize their mother's voice while in the NICU [41]. This component of FNI is designed to encourage the mother to speak to her infant and respond to her infant's vocalizations in the mother's native language using varying intonations. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Objective: This study assessed the impact of Family Nurture Intervention (FNI) on the quality of maternal caregiving behavior (MCB) while in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). FNI is a randomized controlled trial conducted in a high-acuity NICU to facilitate an emotional connection between mothers and their premature infants. FNI begins shortly after birth, continues until discharge, and involves mother/infant calming sessions that include scent cloth exchange, vocal soothing and emotion expression, eye contact, skin-to-skin and clothed holding, and family-based support sessions. Methods: Maternal caregiving behavior was coded during a single holding and feeding session (similar to 30 min) in the NICU before discharge at approximately 36 weeks gestational age (GA). Sixty-five mothers and their premature infants (34 male, 31 female; 26-34 wk GA) were included in these analyses (FNI, n 5 35; standard care [SC], n 5 30). Results: Relative to mothers in the SC condition, those in the FNI group showed significantly higher quality MCB, which remained significant when controlling for birth order, twin status, maternal depression, and maternal anxiety. Conclusion: This is the first study to demonstrate that in-unit MCB can be enhanced by a hospital-based intervention. FNI provides a new rationale for integrating nurture-based interventions into standard NICU care.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics
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    • "Firm Sustained Touch, Vocal Soothing and Eye Contact Exposure to the mother's voice begins in utero. Newborn term infants recognize their mother's voice within minutes of birth and prefer it to a non-maternal voice383940. Yet, there is some evidence that preterm infants may not recognize their mother's voice while in the NICU [41]. "
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Comprehensive Psychiatry
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    • "Firm Sustained Touch, Vocal Soothing and Eye Contact Exposure to the mother's voice begins in utero. Newborn term infants recognize their mother's voice within minutes of birth and prefer it to a non-maternal voice383940. Yet, there is some evidence that preterm infants may not recognize their mother's voice while in the NICU [41]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The stress that results from preterm birth, requisite acute care and prolonged physical separation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) can have adverse physiological/psychological effects on both the infant and the mother. In particular, the experience compromises the establishment and maintenance of optimal mother-infant relationship, the subsequent development of the infant, and the mother's emotional well-being. These findings highlight the importance of investigating early interventions that are designed to overcome or reduce the effects of these environmental insults and challenges. This study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with blinded assessment comparing Standard Care (SC) with a novel Family Nurture Intervention (FNI). FNI targets preterm infants born 26-34 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) and their mothers in the NICU. The intervention incorporates elements of mother-infant interventions with known efficacy and organizes them under a new theoretical context referred to collectively as calming activities. This intervention is facilitated by specially trained Nurture Specialists in three ways: 1) In the isolette through calming interactions between mother and infant via odor exchange, firm sustained touch and vocal soothing, and eye contact; 2) Outside the isolette during holding and feeding via the Calming Cycle; and 3) through family sessions designed to engage help and support the mother. In concert with infant neurobehavioral and physiological assessments from birth through 24 months corrected age (CA), maternal assessments are made using standard tools including anxiety, depression, attachment, support systems, temperament as well as physiological stress parameters. Quality of mother-infant interaction is also assessed. Our projected enrolment is 260 families (130 per group). The FNI is designed to increase biologically important activities and behaviors that enhance maternally-mediated sensory experiences of preterm infants, as well as infant-mediated sensory experiences of the mother. Consequently, we are enlarging the testing of preterm infant neurodevelopment beyond that of previous research to include outcomes related to mother-infant interactions and mother-infant co-regulation. Our primary objective is to determine whether repeated engagement of the mother and her infant in the intervention's calming activities will improve the infant's developmental trajectory with respect to multiple outcomes. Our secondary objective is to assess the effectiveness of FNI in the physiological and psychological co-regulation of the mother and infant. We include aspects of neurodevelopment that have not been comprehensively measured in previous NICU interventions. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01439269.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · BMC Pediatrics
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