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Cardiac Effects of Chamomile Tea

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Abstract

The hemodynamic effects of chamomile tea in patients with cardiac disease were evaluated. 12 patients with cardiac disease underwent cardiac catheterization. Hemodynamic measurements were obtained prior to and 30 min after the oral ingestion of chamomile tea. With tea, the patients demonstrated a small but significant increase in the mean brachial artery pressure. No other significant hemodynamic changes were observed. 10 of the 12 patients fell into a deep sleep shortly after drinking the beverage.

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... M. chamomilla L., Anthemis nobilis L., and Ormenis multicaulis Braun Blanquet and Maire belonging to the family Asteraceae is a natural and major source of “blue oil” and flavonoids. The oil used as a mild sedative and for digestion[2024–29] besides being antibacterial and fungicidal in action.[20] ...
... M. chamomilla L., Anthemis nobilis L., and Ormenis multicaulis Braun Blanquet and Maire belonging to the family Asteraceae is a natural and major source of “blue oil” and flavonoids. The oil used as a mild sedative and for digestion[2024–29] besides being antibacterial and fungicidal in action.[20] ...
... Antonelli had quoted from writings of several doctors of ancient time of the 16th and 17th century that chamomile was used in those times in intermittent fevers.[19] Gould et al. have evaluated the hemodynamic effects of chamomile tea in patients with cardiac disease.[20] It was found in general that the patients fell into deep sleep after taking the beverage. ...
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Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is a well-known medicinal plant species from the Asteraceae family often referred to as the "star among medicinal species." Nowadays it is a highly favored and much used medicinal plant in folk and traditional medicine. Its multitherapeutic, cosmetic, and nutritional values have been established through years of traditional and scientific use and research. Chamomile has an established domestic (Indian) and international market, which is increasing day by day. The plant available in the market many a times is adulterated and substituted by close relatives of chamomile. This article briefly reviews the medicinal uses along with botany and cultivation techniques. Since chamomile is a rich source of natural products, details on chemical constituents of essential oil and plant parts as well as their pharmacological properties are included. Furthermore, particular emphasis is given to the biochemistry, biotechnology, market demand, and trade of the plant. This is an attempt to compile and document information on different aspects of chamomile and highlight the need for research and development.
... Antonelli had quoted from writings of several doctors of ancient time of the 16 th and 17 th century that chamomile was used in those times in intermittent fevers. Gould et al. (1973) have evaluated the hemodynamic effects of chamomile tea in patients with cardiac disease. It was found in general that the patients fell into deep sleep after taking the beverage. ...
... Because of its extensive pharmacological and pharmaceutical properties, the plant thus possesses great economic value and is in great demand on the world market. The essential oil of chemomile is used as antibacterial, antifungicidal, as a mild sedative and for digestion problem (Gould et al., 1973, Pasechnik, 1996, Salamon, 1992. In addition to pharmaceutical uses, the oil is extensively used in perfumery, cosmetics, and aromatherapy, and in food industry (Lal et al., 1993 andMisra et al., 1999). ...
Conference Paper
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... Chamomile tea (made from chamomile flowers) has anti-oxidant activity, [51] Gastrointestinal effects [52], in addition to the sedative effect [53]. The most enhanced medicinal value is obtained when all the components are present in the extract [54][55][56][57][58][59][60][61][62][63][64]. ...
... No other significant hemodynamic changes were observed. 19 However, 10 of 12 patients fell into deep sleep shortly after drinking the tea. ...
... The hemodynamic effects of chamomile tea were examined in an open study of 12 heart disease patients hospitalized for cardiac catheterization. Gould et al. (1973) observed that patients had a small but significant increase in mean brachial artery pressure (91 to 98 mmHg) 30 min after drinking two cups of chamomile tea (prepared as 2 tea bags in 6 oz water). No other significant changes in cardiac function were observed, although 10 of the 12 patients fell into a deep sleep within 10 min of consuming the tea. ...
Article
Chamomile (Matricaria recutita L., Chamomilla recutita L., Matricaria chamomilla) is one of the most popular single ingredient herbal teas, or tisanes. Chamomile tea, brewed from dried flower heads, has been used traditionally for medicinal purposes. Evidence-based information regarding the bioactivity of this herb is presented. The main constituents of the flowers include several phenolic compounds, primarily the flavonoids apigenin, quercetin, patuletin, luteolin and their glucosides. The principal components of the essential oil extracted from the flowers are the terpenoids alpha-bisabolol and its oxides and azulenes, including chamazulene. Chamomile has moderate antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and significant antiplatelet activity in vitro. Animal model studies indicate potent antiinflammatory action, some antimutagenic and cholesterol-lowering activities, as well as antispasmotic and anxiolytic effects. However, human studies are limited, and clinical trials examining the purported sedative properties of chamomile tea are absent. Adverse reactions to chamomile, consumed as a tisane or applied topically, have been reported among those with allergies to other plants in the daisy family, i.e. Asteraceae or Compositae.
... In a pilot study of hospitalized heart patients who were given a strong dose of chamomile tea, a weak hypertensive effect was observed. 170 Ten of the 12 patients immediately entered into a deep sleep lasting an average of 90 minutes. Controlled trials are needed to test this study's observations in people with insomnia and in noninsomnia populations. ...
Article
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Insomnia and other sleep disturbances are common in cancer patients. Insomnia is a multifactorial health concern that currently affects at least 1 in 3 cancer patients, and yet most insomnia sufferers do not consult their physician regarding pharmaceutical options for relief. Use of hypnotic drugs (primarily benzodiazepines) is associated with increasing tolerance, dependence, and adverse effects on the central nervous system. While hypnotic drug use declined substantially in the past decade, the use of herbal sedatives appeared to increase. Mostly self-prescribed by lay people, herbal sedatives hold widespread appeal, presumably because of their lower cost and higher margin of safety when compared to pharmaceuticals. Studies of better-known herbal sedatives, notably valerian and kava, showed moderate evidence for both safety and efficacy for valerian while revealing disturbing toxicity concerns for kava. Milder sedatives or anxiolytics in need of clinical study include German chamomile, lavender, hops, lemon balm, and passionflower; St. John's wort may have anxiolytic effects with relevance to sleep. Herb-drug interactions are a possibility for some of these species, including St. John's wort. Although sufficient evidence exists to recommend some of these agents for short-term relief of mild insomnia, long-term trials and observational studies are needed to establish the safety of prolonged use as well as overall efficacy in the context of cancer treatment and management.
... It contains a flavonoid, apgienin, which has an affinity for benzodiazepine receptors. 64,[91][92][93] In an investigation of the treatment of hypertension in hospitalized patients using chamomile, sleep was induced in 10 out of 12 patients. While there have been reports of sedative effects in humans and animals, no studies of the treatment of insomnia using the herbal remedy have been reported. ...
Article
Insomnia is a frequent problem among the elderly, for which patients often self-medicate. The use of alternative medicine by individuals worldwide, including the elderly, is increasing and insomnia is a common reason for its use. Conventional treatments do not benefit all, and there is uncertainty about the effects of their long-term use. Many alternative therapies have been considered for the treatment of sleep disorders in published medical reports. These consist of pharmacological therapies, including melatonin, valerian, lavender, hops, kava, Chinese and Japanese herbal compounds, pyridoxine, St John's wort and German chamomile, and non-pharmacological therapies, including massage, acupuncture, music therapy, tai chi, magnetism and white noise. Comparison of these treatments, either with each other or with conventional therapies, is difficult because many studies inadequately define insomnia, have few subjects or lack randomization or controls. Many have not been tested specifically on elderly subjects. As a result of the problems in the trials of these treatments, drawing a definitive conclusion about the effectiveness of these therapies is difficult. Melatonin appears to be the most promising. It has been shown to produce some limited benefit by studies to date, although it has not been investigated in enough appropriate subjects to definitively conclude that there is a benefit at a sufficiently low risk. A promising role for melatonin might be in the treatment of elderly people with sleep-phase disorders. Other pharmacological treatments with potential await well-designed studies on the elderly. There are many non-pharmacological therapies that offer the potential advantages of a low side-effect profile, but the investigations of these have been even less rigorous.
... Patients had a small but significant increase in mean brachial artery pressure (91-98 mm Hg) 30 min after drinking two cups of chamomile infusion. No other significant changes in cardiac function have been observed, although 10 of the 12 patients fell into a deep sleep within 10 min of consuming the infusion (Gould et al., 1973). No explanations have yet been given to support these effects. ...
Article
Medicinal plant research is universally on the rise. Researchers, as well as the general public, recognize that natural products, predominantly those derived from plants, may exhibit health benefits. The tendency is to consider natural products as non-toxic and presenting fewer side effects than those used by conventional medicine. However, information concerning the real human health benefits of natural products is yet seldom available, which is a drawback for their possible valuation. Chamomile is one of the most widely used medicinal plants and its sesquiterpenic-related products are an example of this informative weakness. Several health benefits have been claimed for chamomile extracts and for a large number of sesquiterpenic compounds known to occur in chamomile. However, a deep knowledge concerning the compounds responsible for each specific effect, as well as the mechanisms behind them has not been stated, or, if it exists, is dispersed in literature. Thus, this review comprises a deep survey on the reported potential health benefits of chamomile-related sesquiterpenic compounds, and takes into account the models used for their evaluation: in vitro or in vivo. In spite of the relevance of the in vitro and animal studies reported in literature, where the data obtained are very promising concerning the potential health benefits of chamomile-related sesquiterpenic compounds, their extension to human trials is essential. Several aspects related to this actual challenge are discussed.
... It is used to treat hysteria, nightmares, and other sleep problems (Martens, 1995). Deep sleep after 10 minutes of drinking the chamomile tea (two cups) is an effect of this plant (Gould et al., 1973). Active substances of German chamomile can be efficient for infant colic (Weizman et al., 1993). ...
Article
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Matricaria recutita L. (syn. M. chamomilla L., Chamomilla recutita L. Rauschert) is known as true chamomile or German chamomile and Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All. (syn. Anthemis nobilis L.) is known as Roman chamomile. The biological activity of chamomile is mainly due to the flavonoids apigenin, luteolin, quercetin, patuletin and essential oil constituents such as a-bisabolol and its oxides and azulenes. There are several chamomile chemocultivars. Chamomile has anti-inflammatory, deodorant, bacteriostatic, antimicrobial, carminative, sedative, antiseptic, anticatarrhal and spasmolytic properties. It is used to treat sleep problems. Researchers indicated that the pharmacological effect of German chamomile is mainly connected with its essential oils. Environmental conditions and stresses can alter active substances of chamomile. This review focuses on characteristics, secondary metabolites and utilization of German and Roman chamomile.
... (Pothke and Bulin, 1969;Isaac, 1979;Gasic et al., 1983;Schilcher et al., 2005) and these components are known for their antiinflammatory, antiseptic, antiphlogistic, and spasmolytic properties. Although extensive studies have been carried out regarding the pharmacological importance (Antonelli, 1928;Gould et al., 1973;Salamon, 1992;Pasechnik, 1996) of the essential oil constituents, little is known about the genes responsible for biosynthesis of these terpenoid molecules. ...
Article
Matricaria recutita (L.), commonly known as chamomile, is one of the most valuable medicinal plants because it synthesizes a large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as α-bisabolol and chamazulene. Although the plant has been well characterized in terms of chemical constituents of essential oil as well as pharmacological properties, little is known about the genes responsible for biosynthesis of these compounds. In this study, we report a new full-length cDNA encoding farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS), a key enzyme in the pathway of biosynthesis of isoprenoids, from M. recutita. The cDNA of MrFPS comprises 1032 bp and encodes 343 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 39.4 kDa. The amino acid sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis indicated that MrFPS belongs to the plant FPS super-family and is closely related to FPS from the Asteraceae family. Expression of the MrFPS gene in Escherichia coli yielded FPS activity. Using real-time quantitative PCR, the expression pattern of the MrFPS gene was analyzed in different tissues of M. recutita as well as in response to methyl jasmonate. The expression analysis demonstrated that MrFPS expression varies in different tissues (with maximal expression in flowers and stems) and was significantly elevated in response to methyl jasmonate. This study will certainly enhance our understanding of the role of MrFPS in the biosynthesis and regulation of valuable secondary metabolites in M. recutita at a molecular level.
... It also has medicinal properties such as antiinflammatory (Pourohit and Vyas, 2004), antispasmodic, antiseptic and therapeutic use (Franke and Schilcher, 2006) and antimicrobial (Letchamo and Marquard, 1992). The essential oil of chemomile used as antibacterial, antifungicidal, as a mild sedative and for digestion problem (Gould et al., 1973, Pasechnik, 1996, Salamon, 1992. In addition to pharmaceutical uses, the oil is extensively used in perfumery, cosmetics, and aromatherapy, and in food industry (Lal et al., 1993 andMisra et al., 1999). ...
Article
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Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is a well-known aromatic and medicinal plant that belongs to the Asteraceae family. Flowers are the economical part for herbal preparation and essential oil production. Due to the several applications of chamomile in pharmaceutical, nutritional and sanitary industrials, chamomile was one of the most important commercial plants during the recent decades. In spite of its diverse uses, maintained for longer time and existence of suitable climatic conditions, the two chamomile types were never been evaluated for their agronomic and chemical performances in Ethiopia. Therefore, to get benefited out of its potential, this activity was set with the objective of evaluating the performances of American and German type chamomiles for agronomic and chemical traits in different locations of Ethiopia thereby for bringing the crop into cultivation. Data on plant height, flower weight per plant, flower yield per hectare, essential oil content, and essential oil yield were collected from three locations arranged in randomized complete block design with four replications. The overall combined analysis of variance revealed that the two chamomile types are statistically different on plant height, essential oil content and essential oil yield. Location exerted a significance influence on flower yield/plant, essential oil content and essential oil yield. Year and interaction effect of location by year excreted a significant influence on all parameters considered in this study. The average flower yield over all the testing locations varied from 42 to 53.51 g/plant for American and from 37.78 to 58.72 g/plant for German chamomile. The American demonstrated a percent increase value of 9.44% over the German type in essential oil content. The overall essential oil yield varied from 6.85 to 22.15 kg/ha for American chamomile and from 6.71 to 13.7 kg/ha for German chamomile. Both the American and German chamomiles demonstrated a good adaptability at all testing locations indicating the possibility of their cultivation in Ethiopia for herbal flower and essential oil production.
... A study assessed the flavonoid intake of 805 men aged 65-84 years who were followed up for 5 years. It was found that flavonoid intake was significantly lowered the mortality from coronary heart disease and showed an inverse relation with incidence of myocardial infarction [19]. A reported case of M. recutita interaction with cardiovascular drug was brought in a recent study where a 70 year old female patient having a mechanical mitral valve and previous episode of atrial fibrillation and under amiodarone, digoxin, synthroid, alendronate, metoprolol Vitex agnus castus/chaste tree Menstrual symptoms Beta-blockers + Antihypertensives ↑ A [ 12] and warfarin treatment experienced major bleeding due to an increased INR of 7.9. ...
Article
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Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) remain the leading cause of death globally. In addition to conventional medications, a plethora of herbal products continue to offer therapeutic alternatives to patients to assuage suffering. Nonetheless, concomitant administration of herbs and conventional medicine are not always safe which could mimic, oppose or magnify the effect of the latter leading to serious herb-drug interactions, most of which escape pharmacovigilance. The paucity of relevant information to clinicians in relation to herb-drug interactions, the inadequacy of evidence-based knowledge coupled with the lack of mechanistic facts poses a momentous threat to meet desired therapeutic outcomes in CVD patients. In this endeavor, key scientific databases have been explored to review common herbal products that might interfere clinically with conventional drugs used for CVDs and related complications. Ten common medicinal plants have been included and representative case reports whereby herbal products are thought to be inducers of adverse events are also discussed. It is anticipated that the present review will be a pinnacle of evidence and hence serve as an up-to-date fundamental repertoire of recent scientific findings to promote better understanding of adverse herb-drug events amongst clinicians and enhance rapport between clinicians and patients for subsequent counseling. Indeed, acknowledging the risks attributed to herb-drug interactions is fundamental in the management of CVDs and related implications which should not be underestimated or considered as trivial by both health-care professionals and herbal consumers.
... TABLE 1. (continued) Symptom CAM Therapy Evidence in Pediatrics Evidence in Adults Nonsignificant Findings Dominquez, 2000 195 Dorn, 2000 196 Ziegler, 2002 197 Wheatley, 2001 114 Passion flower Akhonzadeh et al, 2001 115 Kava Kava Gurley et al, 2005 112 Wheatley, 2001 114 Pittler and Ernst, 2003 200 Lehmann, 1996 201 Volz and Kieser, 1997 202 Emser and Bartylla, 1991 203 German Chamomile Gould, 1973 (tea), 204 Masago et al (aromatherapy), 2000 119 ...
Article
The use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) has been well documented among children with cancer. This report summarizes the research evidence on the role of CAM therapies for prevention and treatment of the most commonly reported cancer-related symptoms and late effects among children with cancer. Small clinical trials document evidence of effectiveness for select therapies, such as acupuncture or ginger for nausea and vomiting, TRAUMEEL S for mucositis, and hypnosis and imagery for pain and anxiety. Several relatively small clinical trials of varying quality have been conducted on these CAM therapies in children with cancer. Some herbs have demonstrated efficacy in adults, but few studies of herbs have been conducted in children. Larger randomized clinical trials are warranted for each of these promising therapies. Until the evidence is more conclusive, the providers' role is to assess and document the child's use of CAM, critically evaluate the evidence or lack of evidence, balance the potential risks with possible benefits, and assist the family in their choices and decisions regarding use of CAM for their child with cancer.
... It also has medicinal properties such as antiinflammatory (Pourohit and Vyas, 2004), antispasmodic, antiseptic and therapeutic use (Franke and Schilcher, 2006) and antimicrobial (Letchamo and Marquard, 1992). The essential oil of chemomile used as antibacterial, antifungicidal, as a mild sedative and for digestion problem (Gould et al., 1973, Pasechnik, 1996, Salamon, 1992. In addition to pharmaceutical uses, the oil is extensively used in perfumery, cosmetics, and aromatherapy, and in food industry (Lal et al., 1993 andMisra et al., 1999). ...
... Chamomile is known for its as anti-inflammatory [12,13], anti-diarrhea [14], antioxidant [14,15], anti-cancer [16], neuro-protective [17], anti-allergic [18] and antimicrobial [19] effects. It also improves cardiac health [20]. ...
Article
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Objectives The present study aimed at determining the antioxidant activity, total phenols and flavonoids and to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of ethanolic extract of Matricaria recutita L. (chamomile). The antioxidant activities were measured using the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The total phenolic content was measured by the Folin–Ciocalteu assay. The flavonoid content was determined using the aluminum chloride method. The MTT assay was used to estimate the antiproliferative activities against human hepatoma (HepG2) cancer cell line. We assessed the mode of action of the extract as a cancer preventive agent and reported its ability to regulate tumor angiogenesis by down regulating in a dose dependent manner the expression of some proteins involved in the process. Results The percentage inhibition of DPPH scavenging activity was dose-dependent ranging between (94.8% ± 0.03) at 1.50 mg/mL and (84.2% ± 0.86) at 0.15 mg/mL. It showed high polyphenols (21.4 ± 0.327 mg GAE/g) and high flavonoids content (157.9 ± 2.22 mg QE/g). Effect of extract was investigated against HepG2 cells. A dose-dependent reduction in cell viability was recorded in cells treated with the extract. The IC50 was ~ 300 µg/mL. It significantly inhibited the level of important prerequisite angiogenesis markers both in HepG2 cells and ex vivo. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (10.1186/s13104-018-3960-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
... However, several scientific reports and experiments conducted in in vitro and in vivo models (including human studies) are available in the literature and have supported the evidence of not only its well-known mild sedative and anxiolytic effects, but also of its anti-inflammatory and antiphlogistic properties, as well as of its antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antitumoral properties (reviewed in Reference [19]). In the past, it has been shown that oral ingestion of chamomile tea produces significant hemodynamic changes in cardiovascular patients [23]. Other epidemiological studies have reported that the intake of those flavonoids particularly present in chamomile is inversely associated with heart disease risk [24][25][26]. ...
Article
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Inhibitors of chymase have good potential to provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We used a computational approach based on pharmacophore modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the potential ability of 13 natural compounds from chamomile extracts to bind chymase enzyme. The results indicated that some chamomile compounds can bind to the active site of human chymase. In particular, chlorogenic acid had a predicted binding energy comparable or even better than that of some known chymase inhibitors, interacted stably with key amino acids in the chymase active site, and appeared to be more selective for chymase than other serine proteases. Therefore, chlorogenic acid is a promising starting point for developing new chymase inhibitors.
... No other significant hemodynamic changes were observed after chamomile consumption. Ten of the 12 patients fell into a deep sleep shortly after drinking the beverage (Gould, Reddy, & Gomprecht, 1973) and these results are also parallel to our results. ...
Chapter
A glabrous, branching, erect, and aromatic annual of the COMPOSITAE family. It grows to about 1 m tall with a strong odor when bruised. The leaves, 2 to 3, are pinnately-parted with a narrow, thorny tip. Flow- ers are large, solitary heads on 2 to 8 cm long, grooved peduncles; The ray florets are white or yellowish, later becoming reflexed, disc florets numerous, yellow, tubular; peduncles 2.5 cm long, dark brown or dusk greenish yellow; achenes with 3–5 faint ribs.
Chapter
IntroductionBlack, oolong and green tea (C. sinensis)Other teas and tisanesSummary and conclusionsReferences
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In the present study, we investigated hypnotic activities of chamomile and passiflora extracts using sleep-disturbed model rats. A significant decrease in sleep latency was observed with chamomile extract at a dose of 300 mg/kg, while passiflora extract showed no effects on sleep latency even at a dose of 3000 mg/kg. No significant effects were observed with both herbal extracts on total times of wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and REM sleep. Flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, at a dose of 3 mg/kg showed a significant antagonistic effect on the shortening in sleep latency induced by chamomile extract. No significant effects were observed with chamomile and passiflora extracts on delta activity during non-REM sleep. In conclusion, chamomile extract is a herb having benzodiazepine-like hypnotic activity.
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Chamomile is one of the most ancient medicinal herbs known to mankind. It is a member of Asteraceae/Compositae family and represented by two common varieties viz. German Chamomile (Chamomilla recutita) and Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). The dried flowers of chamomile contain many terpenoids and flavonoids contributing to its medicinal properties. Chamomile preparations are commonly used for many human ailments such as hay fever, inflammation, muscle spasms, menstrual disorders, insomnia, ulcers, wounds, gastrointestinal disorders, rheumatic pain, and hemorrhoids. Essential oils of chamomile are used extensively in cosmetics and aromatherapy. Many different preparations of chamomile have been developed, the most popular of which is in the form of herbal tea consumed more than one million cups per day. In this review we describe the use of chamomile in traditional medicine with regard to evaluating its curative and preventive properties, highlight recent findings for its development as a therapeutic agent promoting human health.
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The study aimed to compare the effects of Chamomile Extract and Mefenamic acid (MA) on the intensity of Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms. This study was a clinical randomized double blind trial, carried out with 90 students living in the dorms of Iran. The participants filled the daily forms about the intensity of PMS for two consecutive months. Once the definitive diagnosis of PMS was made, the participants were divided into two groups, each receiving either Chamomile capsule 100 mg or MA 250 mg three times a day. Intensity reduction of emotional symptoms was significantly higher among Chamomile Extract-users (30.1 ± 26.6 and 33.4 ± 25.3 percent) than that among MA-users (11.6 ± 25.7 and 10.7 ± 26.8 percent) after two cycles intervention (p < 0.001). Intensity reduction of physical symptoms was not significantly different (p > 0.05) among groups. Consumption of Chamomile seems to be more effective than MA in relieving the intensity of PMS associated symptomatic psychological pains.
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A comprehensive and authoritative text providing information on the usefulness, effectiveness and appropriateness of the use of herbal remedies in childhood. A practical guide to the safe and effective use of herbal medicines in pediatric primary care, written by a respected and internationally known expert Easily accessible information ensures quick reference in practice Case histories and practical tips make this an essential companion for all professionals in primary care. "Herbal Treatment of Children: Western and Ayurvedic Perspectives aims to provide healthcare professionals with a practical guide to how the use of herbal medicine can contribute to modern paediatric care. It promotes an integrative approach to healthcare that considers a variety of treatment possibilities, using both western and ayurvedic herbs." "Health professionals increasingly acknowledge that many of their clients have interests in complementary medicine, and this book sets out to create a greater and more meaningful symbiosis between their work and that of the herbalist. They need to be aware of the benefits and possible risks, to take advantage of the most up-to-date information available, and to draw on the knowledge of the professional herbalist. In return, the herbalist can advise on the safe and effective use of herbal medicines and give advice on dosage, interactions and contraindications, so that the confidence in herbal medicine that it deserves is ascertained."--BOOK JACKET.
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Die pflanzlichen Arzneistoffe, die im folgenden beschrieben werden, sind in den gängigen Arzneimittelverzeichnissen, beispielsweise in der (Roten Liste (1993)), teils unter die Sedativa-Hypnotika, teils unter die Psychopharmaka eingeordnet. Unter den sedativ und hypnotisch wirkenden Pharmaka versteht man Stoffe, welche die Aktivität des „Wachsystems“ in der Formatio reticularis vermindern. Diese Eigenschaft kommt keinem der pflanzlichen „Beruhigungsmitteln“ zu, die heute therapeutisch verwendet werden. Die Bezeichnung „Arzneimittel mit psychotroper Wirkung“ wurde deshalb gewählt, weil dieser Begriff nicht in gleicher Weise terminologisch festgelegt ist, wie die Begriffe „Sedativa, Hypnotika und Psychopharmaka“. Für viele pflanzliche „Beruhigungsmittel“ fehlen Wirksamkeitsnachweise im Sinne der naturwissenschaftlich orientierten Medizin.
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Among the “Chamomille”, Matricaria species constitute an homogeneous botanical group of interest for phytotherapists. More particularly the german chamomille, Matricaria recutita, is largely described in the scientific literature for its sedative, digestive effect and use in dermoinflammatory diseases.
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We studied the psychological and physiological effects in humans of eating chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) and chamomile-free jellies. In 40 male and female examinees with an average age of 37.7±5.4 (mean±SD), we observed peripheral skin temperature and sleep consciousness upon ingestion of cold (10°C) and warm (60°C) jelly samples. Within 22 minutes of ingestion, the male and female groups that ate warm chamomile jelly showed a significant rise in skin temperature (p≤0.05) compared to the groups that ate the chamomile-free jelly. On the other hand, the male and female groups that ate the cold jelly did not exhibit a significant rise in temperature. The experimental result indicated that eating warm chamomile jelly enhanced blood current and contributed to the rise in the peripheral skin temperature. We also conducted a psychological test with Mood Check List-Short Form 1 (MCL-S.1) before and after the ingestion and found that the relaxed feeling score tended to increase with the ingestion of warm chamomile jelly. We then studied night sleep after the ingestion of warm chamomile jelly, and used OSA (Oguri-Shirakawa-Azumi) survey sheets to observe the change in sleep consciousness. In the survey we used five subordinate factors: Sleepiness in the morning, Staying asleep, Anxiety, Satisfaction of sleep, and Ease of getting to sleep. The study showed that the male group showed a significant rise (p≤0.05), when they woke up, in the score of the factors Sleepiness in the morning, Staying asleep, and Ease of getting to sleep, compared to the group that ate chamomile-free jelly. The results clarified that eating warm chamomile jelly had psychological and physiological effects in humans and improved sleep consciousness.
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The definition of aromatherapy is the controlled use of essential oils (2). Essential oils are steam distillates obtained from aromatic plants. Aromatherapy is a fairly new complementary therapy, although its roots are in herbal medicine, one of the oldest known forms of medicine. Aromatherapy is an accepted part of nursing care in the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Germany, Australia, and Canada, and many nurses in the United States are beginning to use aromatherapy. Aromatherapy is particularly useful in cardiology (see Table 1), because the use of familiar smells and gentle touch can be deeply reassuring. Essential oils have many other properties that can be useful in cardiology-hypotensor, sedative, antiinflammatory, antispasmodic, analgesic, antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral. This chapter covers the use of aromatherapy for borderline hypertension and for fear and anxiety associated with myocardial infarction (MI) or cardiac surgery and outlines interesting case and small clinical studies addressing the effect of essential oils on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Table 1 Essential Oils for Specific Diagnosis Diagnosis Essential oil Research Reference Borderline hypertension Ylang ylang Lavender Rose Neroli Lemon Clary sage Freund, 2000 Saeki and Shiohara, 2001 Nathan, 2000 Tiran, 1996 Tiran, 1996 Tiran, 1996 28 30 31 34 34 34 Reducing fear and anxiety Lavender Roman chamomile Rose Hadfiele, 2001 Yamada et al., 1996 Manly, 1993 41 46 51 Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureaus Tea tree Lavender Juniper Peppermint Lemongrass Eucalyptus Clove Thyme Nelson, 1997 Nelson, 1997 Nelson, 1997 Nelson, 1997 Sherry et al., 2001 Sherry et al., 2001 Sherry et al., 2001 Sherry et al., 2001 22 22 22 22 26 26 26 26
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This chapter focuses on the health benefits of traditional culinary and medicinal plants of the Mediterranean region. The Mediterranean diet is mentioned to be rich in fruits and vegetables, monounsaturated fatty acids and olive oil and the diet has a negative association with incidence of metabolic syndrome that contributes to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mediterranean plants are believed to prevent or cure a wide range of ailments based on their bioactive components that can exert anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic or anti-diabetic activities. A table is presented that gives a list of Mediterranean plants and their health benefits as well as brief accounts of the medicinal use of the plants and includes rosemary, licorice, chamomile and olive oil among others. The consumption of olive oil has a strong correlation with reduced hypertension, cancers of the prostate, breast and colon. It highlights the mechanism of action of the bioactive components and the molecular targets derived from these plants.
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This chapter focuses on the medicinal herb, chamomile and its health promoting properties in the older population. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is provided as an adjunct to mainstream medicine with the intention to provide symptom relief and improve quality of life. The different classes of bioactive compounds in chamomile are used in medicinal preparations as well as cosmetics and these compounds include terpenoids and flavonoids. An outline of the various preparations of chamomile, such as dry powder, standardized extract, oral infusion and tea preparation is given. The use of chamomile as a therapeutic agent is mentioned for common cold, cardiovascular conditions, eczema and gastrointestinal conditions among others. Drinking of chamomile tea is stated to boost the immune system and helps fight infections associated with cold and thus shows its health promoting benefits. The quality of life of cancer patients is shown to improve by use of the essential oils of chamomile in aromatherapy/massage for anxiety. The adverse effects to chamomile can occur in people who are sensitive to members of the Compositae family and the side effect can manifest as contact dermatitis.
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(E)-β-farnesene is a sesquiterpene semiochemical that is used extensively by both plants and animals for communication. This acyclic olefin is found in the essential oil of chamomile (Matricaria recutita) and was demonstrated that it could attract natural enemies to reduce cabbage aphids in the Chinese cabbage fields. However, little is known regarding the sequence and function of (E)-β-farnesene synthase in M. recutita. In this study, we reported a new full-length cDNA encoding (E)-β-farnesene synthase from M. recutita (Mr-βFS). The cDNA of Mr-βFS consisted of 2010bp including 1725bp of coding sequence encoding a protein of 574 amino acids with a molecular weight of 67kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibits a considerably higher homology to βFS from Artemisia annua (about 92% identity) than to βFSs from other plants (about 20-40% identity). The recombinant enzyme, produced in Escherichia coli, catalyzed the formation of a single product, (E)-β-farnesene, from farnesyl diphosphate. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that Mr-βFS expression was highest in leaves and lowest in disk florets. The treatment of M. recutita with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) significantly enhanced the transcriptional level of βFS gene and the content of (E)-β-farnesene in M. recutita. The transcriptional level of βFS gene was approximately 11.5-fold higher than the control sample and the (E)-β-farnesene emission level ranged from approximately from 0.082 to 0.695μg/g after 24h induction. Our results laid a solid foundation for later improving crop aphid resistance by transgenic technology and provided an important basic data for the regulation of valuable products from M. recutita. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.