Article

Simulation of the Mating Advantage in Mating of Rare Drosophila Males

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Abstract

In several species of Drosophila, certain males mate more frequently when they are less abundant than they do when they are in the majority. The mating advantage may be artificially induced by the use of a "double chamber" technique, even when there is no difference in the actual frequencies of the competing males.

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