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Pharmacological Modifications of the Sodium Channels of Frog Nerve

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Abstract

Voltage clamp measurements on myelinated nerve fibers show that tetrodotoxin, saxitoxin, and DDT specifically affect the sodium channels of the membrane. Tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin render the sodium channels impermeable to Na ions and to Li ions and probably prevent the opening of individual sodium channels when one toxin molecule binds to a channel. The apparent dissociation constant of the inhibitory complex is about 1 nM for the cationic forms of both toxins. The zwitter ionic forms are much less potent. On the other hand, DDT causes a fraction of the sodium channels that open during a depolarization to remain open for a longer time than is normal. The effect cannot be described as a specific change in sodium inactivation or as a specific change in sodium activation, for both processes continue to govern the opening of the sodium channels and neither process is able to close the channels. The effects of DDT are very similar to those of veratrine.
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Proefschrift New York, Rockefeller Univ., 1967. Photogr. repr.