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[Boric acid poisoning]

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Article
The skin manifestations associated with boric acid intoxication are particularly striking. We present a case report of a 44-year-old black woman who, following a suicide attempt, demonstrated the classic features of acute boric acid poisoning. She developed generalized erythema creating a "boiled lobster" appearance with massive areas of desquamation. A discussion of the history of the use of boric acid by the medical profession follows the patient presentation.
Article
Summary1.Three case of transcutaneous absorption of boric acid in infants treated for diaper rash are reported. One child died. The diagnoses were made on clinical grounds and corroborated by laboratory analysis of blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid.2.Borated dusting powders, widely sold commercially, are shown to be capable of forming saturated solutions in common clinical situations with possible resultant absorption of toxic quantities through broken skin.3.The use of boric acid should be discontinued in favor of safe and efficient antibacterial agents that are now available.
Article
There have been cases of fatal poisoning from percutaneous absorption of pure boric acid in infants with skin diseases. Recent concern over the use of the pure acid in the treatment of infantile eczema has led to a recommendation that the use of all preparations of boric acid in paediatric clinics should be discontinued.There is, however, no evidence of toxicity in use of boric acid preparations to intact skin or mucous membranes.
Article
1.The incidence of ammonia dermatitis has been greatly reduced during the past thirty years because of proper diagnosis of symptoms and the initiation of successful therapeutic measures.2.Commercial diaper laundries employvarious chemicals for the prevention of ammonia dermatitis. The chemicals commonly used have been either mercurial or quaternary ammonium compounds.3.Home laundries have had bothtype compounds available but because of cost, toxicity, and difficulty of handling they have not been generally used.4.O-benzyl-p-chlorophenol (Stero-Test)eliminates these objections in addition to showing greater range of effectivity in hard and soft water. Soaps, anionic detergents, and organic material do not interfere with the bacteriostatic or bactericidal efficiency of Stero-Test.
Article
Boron, the fifth element in the periodic table, is ubiquitous in nature. It is present in food and in surface and ocean waters, and is frequently used in industrial, cosmetic, and medical settings. Exposure to boron and related compounds has been recently implicated as a potential cause of chronic kidney disease in Southeast Asia. This observation prompted the present review of the published data on the effects of acute and chronic exposure to boron on renal function and structure in human beings and in experimental animals.
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