Article

The relation of adiposity to blood pressure and development of hypertension. The Framingham Study

Annals of internal medicine (Impact Factor: 17.81). 08/1967; 67(1):48-59.
Source: PubMed
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    • "We have also found a clear association between obesity and hypertension as most of the hypertensive adults are found to be obese and vise versa. This relationship between body weight and BP was demonstrated prospectively in the Framingham Heart Study in the 1960s (Kannel et al. 1967). The nature of the linkage between hypertension and body weight remained obscure until the mid-1980s when basic clinical and population-based research significantly clarified many aspects of the relationship between these two common and complex regulatory disturbances. "
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    ABSTRACT: The increasing prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus as well as hypertension among Indian population has already become a subject matter for the health planners as well as the researchers who are engaged in mitigating the same in years to come. But lots of work has to be done from the scientific point of view to correlate different biosocial parameters with diabetes as well as hypertension to understand its basic etiology of such diseases to its full extent. Anthropometric parameters are elementary factors which can have profound impact on such health outcome. In the present paper we have observed the relationship of Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and hypertension with the anthropometric outcome among an urban population of Udaipur city, Rajasthan. Strong correlation has been found between diabetes and systolic blood pressure. Most of the diabetic subjects are found to be underweight whereas most of the hypertensive subjects are found to be obese.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015
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    • "We have also found a clear association between obesity and hypertension as most of the hypertensive adults are found to be obese and vise versa. This relationship between body weight and BP was demonstrated prospectively in the Framingham Heart Study in the 1960s (Kannel et al. 1967). The nature of the linkage between hypertension and body weight remained obscure until the mid-1980s when basic clinical and population-based research significantly clarified many aspects of the relationship between these two common and complex regulatory disturbances. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The increasing prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus as well as hypertension among Indian population has already become a subject matter for the health planners as well as the researchers who are engaged in mitigating the same in years to come. But lots of work has to be done from the scientific point of view to correlate different biosocial parameters with diabetes as well as hypertension to understand its basic etiology of such diseases to its full extent. Anthropometric parameters are elementary factors which can have profound impact on such health outcome. In the present paper we have observed the relationship of Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and hypertension with the anthropometric outcome among an urban population of Udaipur city, Rajasthan. Strong correlation has been found between diabetes and systolic blood pressure. Most of the diabetic subjects are found to be underweight whereas most of the hypertensive subjects are found to be obese.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015
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    • "A longitudinal design would facilitate examination of causal relationships between, e.g., metabolic variables and BP, and their predictive value vis-à-vis the emergence of a full-blown MetS. Usefulness of cross-sectional studies, however, should not be underestimated, as they have generated many clinically highly relevant findings (e.g., NHANES III [7], Framingham Study [57] and Bogalusa Heart Study [58]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Visceral fat (VF) promotes the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which emerges as early as in adolescence. The clustering of MetS components suggests shared etiologies, but these are largely unknown and may vary between males and females. Here, we investigated the latent structure of pre-clinical MetS in a community-based sample of 286 male and 312 female adolescents, assessing their abdominal adiposity (VF) directly with magnetic resonance imaging. Principal component analysis of the five MetS-defining variables (VF, blood pressure [BP], fasting serum triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and glucose) identified two independent components in both males and females. The first component was sex-similar; it explained >30% of variance and was loaded by all but BP variables. The second component explained >20% of variance; it was loaded by BP similarly in both sexes but additional loading by metabolic variables was sex-specific. This sex-specificity was not detected in analyses that used waist circumference instead of VF. In adolescence, MetS-defining variables cluster into at least two sub-syndromes: (1) sex-similar metabolic abnormalities of obesity-induced insulin resistance and (2) sex-specific metabolic abnormalities associated with BP elevation. These results suggest that the etiology of MetS may involve more than one pathway and that some of the pathways may differ between males and females. Further, the sex-specific metabolic abnormalities associated with BP elevation suggest the need for sex-specific prevention and treatment strategies of MetS.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · PLoS ONE
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