Article

A Longitudinal Study of Human Papillomavirus DNA Detection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Seropositive and -Seronegative Women

Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333.
The Journal of Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 6). 05/1994; 169(5):1108-12. DOI: 10.1093/infdis/169.5.1108
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cervicovaginal lavage samples from 124 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive and 126 HIV-1-seronegative
women were collected monthly for 8 months and tested for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. The estimated prevalence of HPV was
42.8% in HIV-1-seropositive and 13.4% in -seronegative women (P < .00l). There was no significant difference in HPV DNA detection in HIV-1-seropositive women with CD4 cell counts of <300/mm3 (50% HPV-positive), 300–499/mm3 (36.4% HPV-positive), or ⩾500/mm3 (40.5% HPV-positive). However, HIV-1-seropositive women who were more immunocompromised, as indicated by lower CD4 cell counts,
were more likely to shed HPV persistently. The quantity of HPV DNA detected in cervicovaginal lavage samples was similar in
HIV-1-seropositive and -seronegative women. This study further defined the characteristics of HPV infections in HIV-1-infected
women.

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Available from: Suzanne D Vernon, Mar 08, 2014
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    • "In HIV infection, lower CD4 counts have been associated with a higher prevalence of HPV infection [5, 46] and persistent shedding of HPV DNA [47, 48]. HPV viral load increases with immune suppression, likely accounting for greater facility of HPV DNA detection [46]. "
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    • "The cell-mediated immune system is believed to be central to the control of HPV infection, as evidenced by an increase in the incidence, prevalence and persistence of HPV infections in immunocompromised individuals, particularly human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-positive women (Minkoff et al., 1998; Ahdieh et al., 2001; Sun et al., 1997; Palefsky et al., 1999; Vernon et al., 1994). Little is known regarding the immune control of HPV variants; in addition, few studies have compared the prevalence of HPV variants in HIV-positive and -negative subjects (Perez-Gallego et al., 2001; Icenogle et al., 1992). "
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 variant lineages was characterized in a cross-sectional study of 24 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-positive and 33 HIV-negative women in New Orleans. The European prototype was the predominant variant in the HIV-negative women (39.4 %), while in the HIV-positive women the European 350G variant was predominant (29.1 %). In exact logistic regression models, HIV-positive women were significantly more likely to harbour any variant with a nucleotide G-350 mutation compared with HIV-negative women [58.3 % vs 21.1 %; adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=6.28, 95 % confidence interval (CI)=1.19-46.54]. Models also revealed a trend towards increased prevalence of Asian-American lineage in HIV-positive women compared with HIV-negative women (25.0 % vs 6.0 %; AOR=6.35, 95 % CI=0.77-84.97). No association was observed between any variant and cytology or CD4 cell counts or HIV-1 viral loads. These observations reflect a difference in the distribution of HPV-16 variants among HIV-positive and -negative women, indicating that HIV-positive status may lead to increased prevalence of a subset of variants.
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    • "The cell-mediated immune system is believed to be central to the control of HPV infection, as evidenced by an increase in the incidence, prevalence and persistence of HPV infections in immunocompromised individuals, particularly human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-positive women (Minkoff et al., 1998; Ahdieh et al., 2001; Sun et al., 1997; Palefsky et al., 1999; Vernon et al., 1994). Little is known regarding the immune control of HPV variants; in addition, few studies have compared the prevalence of HPV variants in HIV-positive and -negative subjects (Perez-Gallego et al., 2001; Icenogle et al., 1992). "

    Preview · Article · May 2004 · Journal of General Virology
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