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Cordain L, Bryan ED, Melby CL, Smith MJ. Influence of moderate daily wine consumption on body weight regulation and metabolism in healthy free-living males. J Am Coll Nutr 16, 134-139

Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80523, USA.
Journal of the American College of Nutrition (Impact Factor: 1.45). 05/1997; 16(2):134-9. DOI: 10.1080/07315724.1997.10718663
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although previous studies have clearly demonstrated that energy from alcohol may not be efficiently utilized to maintain body weight when it comprises 20% or more of the daily caloric intake, there is considerable debate regarding the influence of moderate alcohol consumption (< or = 5% of the total daily caloric intake) upon metabolism, substrate utilization and body weight regulation. Consequently, the objectives of this study were to determine whether moderate alcohol consumption could influence body weight via changes in substrate utilization, oxygen consumption or alterations in dietary macronutrient content.
Fourteen male subjects (mean age = 32.1 years) participated in a 12-week, free-living, crossover trial in which they either drank red wine (270 ml; 13% v/v ethanol) daily for 6 weeks and then abstained for the next 6 weeks or vice-versa.
Whether wine was imbibed or not, no significant differences (p > 0.05) were demonstrated for any of the following variables: body weight, body fat percentage, skinfold thickness, resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, caloric intake, dietary macronutrient content, or fasting insulin or glucose concentrations.
In free-living subjects over a 6-week period, the addition of two glasses of red wine to the evening meal does not appear to influence any measured variable which may adversely affect body weight or promote the development of obesity during this time period.

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    • "Drinking alcohol beverages is a common feature of social gatherings. However, many societies experience serious medical, social and economic problems as a result of alcohol abuse (Room et al., 2005; Guo and Ren, 2010), even though drinking in moderation may not be harmful (Cordain et al., 1997; Frid, 2000; Gaziano et al., 2000; Elkind et al., 2006). A long-term alcohol misuse or binge drinking can result in life-threatening physical and mental health hazards and cause detrimental damage to human organs, including the brain, liver, heart, lungs, skeletal muscles and bones. "
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: Alcohol toxicity can induce multiple organ dysfunction, including the liver. Gallated catechins (GCs), the components of green tea extract (GTE), have been known to inhibit intestinal lipid absorption. This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effect of GC on the absorption of the lipid-soluble ethanol in normal mice. In addition, the effectiveness of prolonging the GC-mediated effect was evaluated as a means of preventing alcoholic liver damage. Methods: GTE was administered orally immediately or 90 min before ethanol administration and the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde levels were measured. Binge ethanol administration (by gavage every 6 h for 24 h) was used to induce acute liver injury, and GTE was administered 90 min prior to every ethanol administration. Results: When GTE, but not GC-decreased GTE, was administered immediately before ethanol intake, the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde levels were significantly lower than those in the control. On the other hand, GTE has no effect when GTE was administered 90 min before ethanol intake. When GTE was co-administered with polyethylene glycol (PEG) or poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) 90 min before ethanol intake, the lowering effect of GTE on the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde levels was maintained in contrast to the GTE-alone-treated group. After binge ethanol administration, liver weight decreased, and serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were elevated. Additionally, histopathological changes, such as macrovesicular steatosis and necrosis, were induced in the liver, together with reactive oxygen species generation. When GTE + PEG or GTE + PGA, but not GTE alone, was administered 90 min before ethanol intake, acute liver injury was ameliorated. Conclusion: These findings support the development of GTE + PEG or GTE + PGA as an inhibitor of intestinal alcohol absorption for the preventative treatment of acute alcohol toxicity.
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    • "A recent study in obese humans (The Copenhagen City Heart Study) indicated that prolonged moderate red-wine consumption (but not of other alcoholic beverages) tended to decrease abdominal obesity [6]. However, this effect has not been observed by other authors [7] [8]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Red wine is a beverage that can exert a broad spectrum of health-promoting actions both in humans and laboratory animal models if consumed moderately. However, information about its effect on body weight is scarce. We have evaluated the effect of moderate red wine consumption on body weight and energy intake in male Zucker lean rats fed a hypercaloric diet for 8 weeks. For this purpose, we used three 5-animal groups: a high-fat diet group (HFD), a high-fat-diet red-wine-drinking group (HFRWD), and a standard diet group (SD). After 8 weeks, the HFRWD group had a lower body weight gain (175.66 +/- 2.78% vs 188.22 +/- 4.83%; P<.05) and lower energy intake (269.45 +/- 4.02 KJ/animal.day vs day vs 300.81 +/- 4.52 KJ/animal.day; P<.05) and had less fat mass at epididymal location respect to the whole body weight (0.014 +/- 0.001 vs 0.017 +/- 0.001; P<.05) than the HFD group. However, the red wine didn't modified the fed efficiency 0.012 +/- 0.001 g/KJ for HFRWD group versus 0.013 +/- 0.001 g/KJ for the HFD one (P=.080). These findings, though preliminary, show that moderate red wine intake can prevent the increase of body weight by modulating energy intake in a rat diet-induced model of obesity.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2006 · The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
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    • "A recent study in obese humans (The Copenhagen City Heart Study) indicated that prolonged moderate red-wine consumption (but not of other alcoholic beverages) tended to decrease abdominal obesity [6]. However, this effect has not been observed by other authors [7] [8]. "

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