Wild-Type and Mutant HIV Type 1 Nucleocapsid Proteins Increase the Proportion of Long cDNA Transcripts by Viral Reverse Transcriptase

ArticleinAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses 13(7):533-43 · May 1997with26 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.33 · DOI: 10.1089/aid.1997.13.533 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    HIV-1 nucleocapsid, p7, contains two retroviral zinc fingers, which are both necessary for efficient packaging of genomic RNA and infectivity. The nucleocapsid protein is bound tightly to genomic RNA in the mature virion. In this study, the effect of p7 on polymerization of nascent cDNA by viral reverse transcriptase (RT) was examined. An 874-base RNA of HIV-1 was synthesized and used as a template in RT assays with varying concentrations of intact p7, mutants of p7 that have transposed or repeated zinc fingers, and several different peptides that represent various structural regions of p7. Results indicate that at greater than or equal to 50% saturation of p7-binding sites, with p7, there is up to a 90% reduction in total cDNA synthesis, as measured by nucleotide incorporation. However, the cDNA products that are made are almost exclusively full length. Three zinc finger mutants exhibited effects similar to those of wild-type p7. N-terminal and C-terminal halves of p7 inhibited total nucleotide incorporation, but also inhibited synthesis of long cDNA products by RT. In the absence of p7 an array of short transcripts (< 200 bases) was produced by RT. These studies show that full-length p7 is necessary to increase the proportion of long cDNA transcripts produced by RT. The relative position of the two zinc fingers is not critical for this effect.