Article

Psychiatric disorders among American Indian and White youth in Appalachia: The Great Smoky Mountains Study

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
American Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 4.55). 06/1997; 87(5):827-32. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.87.5.827
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study examined prevalence of psychiatric disorders, social and family risk factors for disorders, and met and unmet needs for mental health care among Appalachian youth.
All 9-, 11-, and 13-year-old American Indian children in an 11-county area of the southern Appalachians were recruited, together with a representative sample of the surrounding population of White children.
Three-month prevalences of psychiatric disorders were similar (American Indian, 16.7%; White, 19.2%). Substance use was more common in American Indian children (9.0% vs 3.8% in White children), as was comorbidity of substance use and psychiatric disorder (2.5% vs 0.9%). American Indian poverty, family adversity (e.g., parental unemployment, welfare dependency), and family deviance (parental violence, substance abuse, and crime) rates were higher, but the rate of family mental illness, excluding substance abuse, was lower. Child psychiatric disorder and mental health service use were associated with family mental illness in both ethnic groups but were associated with poverty and family deviance only in White children. Despite lower financial barriers, American Indian children used fewer mental health services.
This study suggests that poverty and crime play different roles in different communities in the etiology of child psychiatric disorder.

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Available from: Barbara Burns, Aug 24, 2015
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    • "Por lo tanto los hallazgos parecen apoyar que estos niños y niñas han logrado mecanismos adecuados de adaptación que les han permitido integrarse al contexto urbano. Estos resultados también son consistentes a lo encontrado por Zwirs et al. (2007) con niños inmigrantes en Europa y por Costello et al. (1997) con niños inmigrantes en Estados Unidos. Una tercera posibilidad es que no existan diferencias en las formas de afrontamiento en estos niños aymara debido a que aún se encuentran en su infancia, pero que puede que surjan diferencias conforme los niños vayan creciendo y deban afrontar una mayor discriminación (Zwirs, et al., 2007). "

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    • "This suggests that Aymara children possess adequate adaptive mechanisms for integrating into an urban context. These results are consistent with those of Zwirs et al. [63] in Europe and Costello et al. [64] in the United States. "
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    • "Por lo tanto los hallazgos parecen apoyar que estos niños y niñas han logrado mecanismos adecuados de adaptación que les han permitido integrarse al contexto urbano. Estos resultados también son consistentes a lo encontrado por Zwirs et al. (2007) con niños inmigrantes en Europa y por Costello et al. (1997) con niños inmigrantes en Estados Unidos. Una tercera posibilidad es que no existan diferencias en las formas de afrontamiento en estos niños aymara debido a que aún se encuentran en su infancia, pero que puede que surjan diferencias conforme los niños vayan creciendo y deban afrontar una mayor discriminación (Zwirs, et al., 2007). "
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