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Guidelines on sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) exposure tests. A report from the Standardization Group of the European Society of Contact Dermatitis

Authors:
  • San Gallicano Derm inst

Abstract

This report reviews the clinical and histopathological reactions caused by sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and the non-invasive methods that can characterize these reactions. Furthermore, SLS exposure techniques and factors that may influence the outcome of these exposures are discussed. Finally, guidelines are introduced for each exposure technique in order to have a uniform approach to SLS testing in man. Since different study aims warrant different testing conditions, we have proposed 2 categories, namely susceptibility testing and provocative testing, tailored to the aim with which the study is performed.
... The subjects removed the SLS patches after 24 h, rinsed the skin with water and visited the clinic the day after for evaluation of the irritation. The reaction was assessed with the instruments and visually on a scale ranging from 0 to 4 according to the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD) guideline on clinical scoring of acute SLS irritant reactions [10]. ...
... Based on a previous study, SLS causes skin irritation when applied at a specific concentration 17,18 . As it is widely used in skin irritant research, 20% SLS was therefore chosen as a positive control agent in our study. ...
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Cosmetology (tests of tolerance, selection of subjects for tolerance tests), Regulation acts fulfilment (identification of primary irritants), Occupational medicine (detection of subjects at risk and health-hazard products, measurement of skin alterations of occupational origin), Allergology (identification of irritants and orthoergic reactions).
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