Article

Cognitive-behavioral treatment for depression in alcoholism

Butler Hospital-Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, USA.
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (Impact Factor: 4.85). 10/1997; 65(5):715-26. DOI: 10.1037/0022-006X.65.5.715
Source: PubMed
ABSTRACT
Alcoholics with depressive symptoms score > or = 10 on the Beck Depression Inventory (A.T. Beck, C. H. Ward, M. Mendelson, J. Mock, & J. Erbaugh, 1961) received 8 individual sessions of cognitive-behavioral treatment for depression (CBT-D, n = 19) or a relaxation training control (RTC; n = 16) plus standard alcohol treatment. CBT-D patients had greater reductions in somatic depressive symptoms and depressed and anxious mood than RTC patients during treatment. Patients receiving CBT-D had a greater percentage of days abstinent but not greater overall abstinence or fewer drinks per day during the first 3-month follow-up. However, between the 3- and 6-month follow-ups, CBT-D patients had significantly better alcohol use outcomes on total abstinence (47% vs. 13%), percent days abstinent (90.5% vs. 68.3%), and drinks per day (0.46 vs. 5.71). Theoretical and clinical implications of using CBT-D in alcohol treatment are discussed.

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Available from: Richard A Brown, Dec 19, 2014