Article

Validation of a Cerebral Palsy Register

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 537, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark.
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology (Impact Factor: 3.42). 10/1997; 50(9):1017-23. DOI: 10.1016/S0895-4356(97)00102-9
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To analyse completeness and validity of data in the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982.
Completeness has been assessed by comparing data from The Danish National Patient Register (DNPR) with the cases included in the Cerebral Palsy Register (CPR). Agreement between 12 variables in the CPR and obstetrical medical records has been analysed using kappa-statistics.
Of 468 children in the DNPR, only 237 fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the CPR; and 35 (15%) of these cases had not been reported to the CPR. Data agreement was generally good, but gestational age was subject to a systematic error, and urinary infections in pregnancy (kappa = 0.43) and placental abruption (kappa = 0.52) were seriously under-reported in the CPR.
Completeness of the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982, has been assessed to maximal 85%, emphasizing the impact of using supplementary case ascertainment sources in the future. Validity of data varied according to definition and significance of the specific variable.

0 Followers
 · 
7 Reads
  • Source
    • "Thus, it seems evident that children born after IVF have an increased risk of CP. However, in all but one (Stromberg et al., 2002) of the studies assessing the risk of CP in IVF children, the CP diagnosis was retrieved from hospital discharge registers, but the validity and completeness of the CP diagnosis in these sources have been questioned (Topp et al., 1997). Additionally, we were not able to locate any studies on the risk of CP in children born after ovulation induction (OI). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper assesses the risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in children born after assisted conception compared with children born after natural conception (NC). This population based follow-up study included all 588,967 children born in Denmark from 1995 to 2003. Assisted conception was defined as IVF, with or without ICSI, and ovulation induction (OI), with or without subsequent insemination. There were 33 139 (5.6%) children born in Denmark from 1995 to 2003 as a result of assisted conception and through to June 2009, 1146 (0.19%) children received a CP diagnosis. Children born after assisted conception had an increased risk of a CP diagnosis, crude hazard rate ratio (HRR) 1.90 (95% CI: 1.57-2.31) compared with NC children. Divided into IVF and OI children compared with NC children, the risk was HRR 2.34 (95% CI: 1.81-3.01) and HRR 1.55 (95% CI: 1.17-2.06), respectively. When we included the intermediate factors multiplicity and gestational age in multivariate models, the risk of CP in assisted conception disappeared. In general, children with CP born after assisted conception had similar CP subtypes and co-morbidities as children with CP born after NC. The risk of CP is increased after both IVF and OI. The increased risk of CP in children born after assisted conception, and in particular IVF, is strongly associated with the high proportion of multiplicity and preterm delivery in these pregnancies. A more widespread use of single embryo transfer warrants consideration to enhance the long-term health of children born after IVF.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2010 · Human Reproduction
  • Source
    • "The same paediatric neurologist evaluated all reports and case notes, but some bias should be considered. The validity of the Registry was studied in 1997 (Topp et al. 1997a). The birth years 1979–1982 were re-evaluated, and the Registry was found to be only 85% complete before linkage to the National Patient Registry. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819 participants with CP born between 1965 and 1978 (471 males; mean age 28y 10 mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y) in the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry were compared with 4406 controls without CP born between 1965 and 1978 (2546 males; mean age 28y 10 mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y). Diagnostic subtypes of the 819 participants with CP were: 31% hemiplegia, 43% diplegia, 18% tetraplegia, and 8% other types. Level of motor impairment with respect to walking ability was: 62% able to walk without assistance, 21% with assistance, and 16% not able to walk (for 1% of study children walking ability was not known). Relevant information was obtained from Denmark's unique registries. Of the participants with CP, 33% vs 77% of controls, had education beyond lower secondary school (i.e. after age 15-16y), 29% were competitively employed (vs 82% of controls), 5% were studying, and 5% had specially created jobs. Excluding participants with CP with an estimated developmental quotient (DQ) of less than 50 or inability to walk at age 5 to 6 years, the odds ratios (multivariate analysis) for not being competitively employed were 1.9 for diplegia versus hemiplegia, 22.5 for DQ 50 to 85 versus DQ greater than 85, and 3.7 for those with epilepsy versus those without epilepsy. The severity of motor impairment among participants with CP able to walk had just a minor influence. Only half the participants with CP who had attended mainstream schooling were employed. In conclusion several childhood characteristics seemed to predict long-term social prognosis.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2005 · Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology
  • Source
    • "The same paediatric neurologist evaluated all reports and case notes, but some bias should be considered. The validity of the Registry was studied in 1997 (Topp et al. 1997a). The birth years 1979–1982 were re-evaluated, and the Registry was found to be only 85% complete before linkage to the National Patient Registry. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Parents and paediatric neurologists need information on the long-term social prognosis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). No large population-based study has been performed on this topic. On 31 December 1999, to find predictors in childhood of subsequent education and employment, 819 participants with CP born between 1965 and 1978 (471 males; mean age 28y 10mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y) in the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry were compared with 4406 controls without CP born between 1965 and 1978 (2546 males; mean age 28y 10mo, SD 4y, range 21 to 35y). Diagnostic subtypes of the 819 participants with CP were: 31% hemiplegia, 43% diplegia, 18% tetraplegia, and 8% other types. Level of motor impairment with respect to walking ability was: 62% able to walk without assistance, 21% with assistance, and 16% not able to walk (for 1% of study children walking ability was not known). Relevant information was obtained from Denmark's unique registries. Of the participants with CP, 33% vs 77% of controls, had education beyond lower secondary school (i.e. after age 15-16y), 29% were competitively employed (vs 82% of controls), 5% were studying, and 5% had specially created jobs. Excluding participants with CP with an estimated developmental quotient (DQ) of less than 50 or inability to walk at age 5 to 6 years, the odds ratios (multivariate analysis) for not being competitively employed were 1.9 for diplegia versus hemiplegia, 22.5 for DQ 50 to 85 versus DQ greater than 85, and 3.7 for those with epilepsy versus those without epilepsy. The severity of motor impairment among participants with CP able to walk had just a minor influence. Only half the participants with CP who had attended mainstream schooling were employed. In conclusion several childhood characteristics seemed to predict long-term social prognosis.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2005 · Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology
Show more