Article

Serotonin 5-HT2 receptor imaging in major depression: Focal changes in orbito-insular cortex

Department of Psychiatry, Erasme Hospital, Brussels, Beligum.
The British Journal of Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 7.99). 12/1997; 171:444-8.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Serotonin receptors may play an important role in the pathophysiology of affective disorders. We studied type-2 serotonin (5-HT2) receptors in the brain of patients with major depression.
Using positron emission tomography (PET) and the selective radioligand [18F]altanserin, we investigated 5-HT2 receptor distribution in eight drug-free unipolar depressed patients and 22 healthy subjects. Data were analysed using Statistical Parametric Mapping 95.
In depressed patients, [18F]altanserin uptake was significantly reduced in a region of the right hemisphere including the posterolateral orbitofrontal cortex and the anterior insular cortex. A trend to similar changes was found in the left hemisphere. No correlation was found between the uptake and the Hamilton rating scale score.
Pathophysiology of depression may involve changes in 5-HT2 receptor in brain regions selectively implicated in mood regulation.

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Available from: Serge Goldman, Jan 14, 2014
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    • "Imaging studies of pre-and post-synaptic 5-HT receptors have also shown decreased 5-HT 2 (Meyer et al., 1999; Yatham et al., 1999) and 5-HT 2A receptor binding (Biver et al., 1997; Massou et al., 1997) in depressed patients compared to non-depressed ones, although these findings are not universally observed (D'haenen et al., 1992). While studies of SERT binding in depression have been attempted using 11 C and 18 F-labeled fluoxetine, sertraline, citalopram and paroxetine (Dannals et al., 1990; Suehiro et al., 1991; Das and Mukherjee, 1993), these agents were not suitable for imaging in humans (Scheffel et al., 1994). "
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    • "Several brain regions are implicated in both major depressive disorder and pain. For example, the insular cortex [57,58], the prefrontal cortex [59,60], the anterior cingulate cortex [61,62], the amygdala and the hippocampus [63-65] are activated and/or altered in response to both depression and pain. Moreover, Robinson [56] verified that shared neurocircuits and neurochemicals play an important role connecting the pathophysiologies of depression and pain disorders. "
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    • "It has been demonstrated that several brain regions are implicated in both major depressive disorder (MDD) and pain. For example, the insular cortex [29,30], the prefrontal cortex [31,32], the anterior cingulate cortex [33,34], the amygdala and the hippocampus [35-37] are activated and/or altered in response to both depression and pain. Moreover, Robinson [28] verified that shared neurocircuits and neurochemicals play an important role connecting the pathophysiologies of depression and pain disorders. "
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